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Lego City Undercover


James Lyon
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70% done.

47 hours 54 minutes.

Good lord. I don't think even the biggest previous Lego game was 50 hours long.

I'm slightly scared to look at my time, I'm on 94% :ph34r:

I do like the bonus for getting all the train stations.

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If you rush through, just to get to the end of the story, avoiding the actual game, then about 12 hours, I'd say. 15 main levels, most about 30-45 minutes, with some between level "missions" and so on.

But if that's all you're going to do, don't fucking bother as the game is wasted on you.

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God you really are a testy little shite aren't you? People, including you are going on about what a high percentage they have got and I wanted to know off the back of that how big the main campaign is. You know a valid question. I bought 4 games with my Wii U over a week ago, I've clocked up over 25 hours playtime on LC and still on chapter 7 of the main quest, the game disc hasn't been out of the console since I bought it but yeah it's wasted on me so why bother. Fuck wit.

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Well just finished the main storyline with a whopping 41% complete (and god knows how many hours invested so far).. Absolutely fantastic stuff.. thought the last mission in particular was bloody incredible!

Such a refreshing change to be playing games with good endings again (having played this off the back of Bioshock Infinite which I felt had an equally rewarding finale, although for totally different reasons)... Its just nice when developers take the time to reward players for their efforts and don't let things slide towards the end. Special mention also has to go to the music which was just perfect throughout, and again builds perfectly during the final stages.

..and so now begins the main bulk of the game.. 100%'ing each section of the island, and replaying the missions all over again! Outside of MMORPGs this has to be some of the best value gaming money can currently buy! Absolutely love it! :wub:

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DeKay, that was an overly harsh response, even if you meant well, Lorf did ask a fair question. I spent ages between getting the 2 and 3rd disguise, I pretty much had to play more story because I'd explored and done almost everything I could with those two. Yes it's arguably a 'collectathon' but I think the balance between exploring and doing stuff in the open world against just collecting stuff for the hell of it is almost perfect. In contrast to say GTAIV's pigeons or something, the exploring is almost always rewarded in some way. Whereas most open world games are generally fairly empty and are just there as almost too literal sandboxes, just an area to play in (with cars and guns), this is more a... toybox, than a sandbox, to stretch the child friendly explanation.

I think the other open world game it's probably the closest to is more Crackdown than it is anything else.

The last bit of the last mission gave me a rare moment that I haven't had in a game for a while when I just realised; 'this is great, I'm really enjoying it!' I know it probably won't be to everyone's tastes but I'd bet a lot of that is 'because it's Lego'. IMHO, if it was real world stuff but had the same metroidvania type unlocking and humour - if the whole game was exactly the same but with people instead of Lego (as most of it could be put in a real setting, even the building stuff really) it would have been much better received and that is a terrible shame. There's almost such a drive to make games like film, or realistic and gritty that a lot of just plain good 'games' get ignored.

I'm writing this after reading dumpsters disillusionment with games on the back of playing Tomb Raider and although TR has spectacle and graffix, this is without a shadow of a doubt, a better game - TR is more similar to a modernized version of Dungeon's Lair in comparison, even though this is quite 'easy', at the very least, you are actually doing all those easy bits yourself in this and the cutscenes are just used to setup and end bits of story.

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Another part of my strategy is to rinse the story mode without worrying about anything else - you can't get all the good stuff without each character type, and you can't get all types without finishing the story.

Once the world and levels are fully open, explore away!

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Hey, my response wasn't aimed at Lorf specifically - just at anyone who thinks about buying the game just to do the story. This isn't Assassin's Creed III.

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Hey, my response wasn't aimed at Lorf specifically - just at anyone who thinks about buying the game just to do the story. This isn't Assassin's Creed III.

But the story is good enough on its own, so buying the game for it is a very valid reason to buy it.
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It's really, really doing the game a massive disservice though.

Like getting a girlfriend just for the odd blowjob, when she could be doing the dishes and the ironing too.

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Collecting stuff is fun if it's challenging and benefits gameplay. Crackdown was genius in that respect; hunting the green orbs in itself was fun to do, but it was made so much better that you actually got extra abilities because of them. But collecting stuff for the sake of it (GTA) or as some artificial construct to hamper progress (DK64) is boring. Not sure what it's like in Lego City Underground obviously, as I haven't played it yet.

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I would play this for the story primarily, usually the whole collect-a-thon stuff in open world games doesn't really interest me. I never bothered tracking down secret packages/pigeons in GTA or feathers in Assassin's Creed and the like. Just the main story lines, general goofing around and interesting sidequests.

Yeah, but they're not really comparable. The side stuff in ACIII bored me to tears and is so tedious. The side stuff in GTAIV is OK, but really nothing like this.

Anyway, uninterested offense aside... Where the fuck is the station in Festival Square?

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Hey, my response wasn't aimed at Lorf specifically - just at anyone who thinks about buying the game just to do the story. This isn't Assassin's Creed III.

But some people might not want to waste two hours of their life looking for a red block ;)

Everyone wants different things from games and while lego titles are clearly geared towards collecting it's not unreasonable that someone might actually want a lengthy campaign to get stuck into, eecially seeing there's a real lack of software on their new console. I thought even at 14 hours it offered good value for money. If you're obessesive about getting every last block it's going to offer even better value. I felt a lot of the time you were collecting stuff for the sake of it, but i'm clearly in the minority.

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I would play this for the story primarily, usually the whole collect-a-thon stuff in open world games doesn't really interest me. I never bothered tracking down secret packages/pigeons in GTA or feathers in Assassin's Creed and the like. Just the main story lines, general goofing around and interesting sidequests.

those things didn't benefit the game though... Lego City has super builds all over the place, which changes the game, and to build them you need to find the super bricks. Also, the puzzles and exploring to find them are genuinely interesting in themselves.

It's absolutely a brilliant game.

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Collecting stuff is fun if it's challenging and benefits gameplay. Crackdown was genius in that respect; hunting the green orbs in itself was fun to do, but it was made so much better that you actually got extra abilities because of them. But collecting stuff for the sake of it (GTA) or as some artificial construct to hamper progress (DK64) is boring. Not sure what it's like in Lego City Underground obviously, as I haven't played it yet.

The majority of the collecting or exploring does have a point, which is why I likened it to Crackdown.

Admittedly some of that is just a different costume for your mans but even that felt worthwhile and I've never collected all the pigeons in GTA or all the flags in any of the Assassin's Creeds.

A lot of it (to me) is the balance of explore and reward, this does it really well. In GTAIV for instance, you'd maybe find a little nook, or you've gone blundering around the back of somewhere (as you don't have any of the nice climbing about or that current buzz word; verticality) thinking 'this is well sneaky, there's bound to be a pigeon here.... but no. Fuck all and no point to have even found it, no hidden anything at all, at best you might get a police bribe. In this, almost every single little corner or rooftop has something in it. My one big complaint for this would be that the invisible 'ceiling' in choppers is quite low and you can't land on everything but at the same time, it does make it more contained and less sprawling for the sake of it.

Still not sure if it could be called a AAA system seller (well, sales show it obviously isn't) but it's definitely a very good game and without a doubt it is my favourite sandbox part of any sandbox game and easily the best Lego game in one.

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Hmm. Can only find 4 T-Rex posters in the museum. Well, I can see a 5th but I can't "target" it with a gun or destroy it like the others. It's to the right of the door to the dinosaur exhibit.

Bug, or am I missing something?

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