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Gender Diversity / Politics in games (was Tropes Vs. Women)


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Unlike dickhead gamers, Metallers are completely used to the mainstream media alternately attacking and ignoring them. Trying to get them to attack minority groups inside the scene is a deep perversion of the natural order of things, so I'd imagine the MRAs will find little sympathy there.

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Nero's writing a book about Gamergate (yes, really.) Here's the cover.

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Looks great so far:

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James Desborough made a GG cardgame and stuck it up as a paid PDF on an RPG download site, like didn't even bother to format it like actual cards and stick it on their site for card games, just minimum effort designed to milk this thing as quick as possible because it's losing relevance and interest by the day. There's sort of an aura of sadness over all of these guys, people earning £16 a month from their Patreons, unable to get the big "being an awful human being for money" gigs like an opinion column for the Mail and have to settle with a business model of patronising internet bullshit.

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I noticed that. Imagine the outrage when they find out that the entire hardcore punk scene is composed of angry anarchist vegans with tattoos.

It's fucking hilarious. Black Sabbath had lyrics (written by vegan Peta donator Geezer Butler) about multiculturalism and the military-industrial complex in 1970. Iron Maiden were doing songs about the extermination of American Indians in the '80s. Even Motorhead have written about social justice themes.

Outside of the misogynist fringe of death metal bands and the National Socialist Black Metal scene it would be nearly impossible to find a single area of metal that isn't full of lefty liberal SJWs.

These people are fucking brilliant.

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[–]Logan_Mac 6 points 3 hours ago

Imo this will look nice as "history" books of sorts, what led to GamerGate and what impact it had, it could be timeless



[–]yiannopoulos_mActual Yiannopoulos, and a pretty cool guy 9 points 3 hours ago

That is the plan


Timeless!

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Anyone read Milo "I haven't played a game in my life, gamers are sad" Yiannopolous' review of Dragon Age: Inquisition? I'm not exactly Mark Kermode myself but shit son, it's like watching a broke-dicked dog trying to fuck a plantpot. I can get over the rampant lesbophobia and the fact he's basically just copying out things people complain about the game for in other reviews but it reads like a teenager wrote it.

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http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2014-12-15-controversial-mass-murdering-game-hatred-appears-on-steam-greenlight?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=socialoomph

Hatred, the rather infantile looking murder-'em-up that was trumpeted about by some GamerGaters a while back, was on Steam for about five minutes earlier. Valve pulled it. Now the gaters are all 'zomg sjws have infiltrated Valve.'

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Why was that Hatred game pulled from Steam though? I can't see anything in the content that differentiates it from any other shooter.

It's not the first time they've declined stuff that got through Greenlight, there was some western made eroge game shortly after the system was introduced that they said no to. EDIT: It was called Seduce Me

It'll still be available on other distribution platforms or straight from the developer.

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And as I've seen a few people point out, it's a bit odd that Steam removed it stating that "we would not publish Hatred on Steam", when of course they have the Postal games, which are just as openly about violence for violence's sake.

Not that I'm sad to see Hatred declined access to Steam's storefront, mind, it just seems a slightly wavy line in the sand that Valve are drawing.

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What other shooters have an explicit structure where the goal is to mass-murder bystanders?

Call of Duty. No Russian

I really don't see the problem. Free market and that. Why is it ok to have slasher films etc, but not games?

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I can mass murder civilians in any number of games as I see fit, and I can murder people with horrific animations in any number of similar games. The addition of a specific scoring mechanic or mission structure for doing so shouldn't be the barometer for appropriateness or define whether or not it's palatable.

I mean, The Last Of Us just released a set of purchasable animations that are explicitly more violent, but there's no uproar about them.

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And as I've seen a few people point out, it's a bit odd that Steam removed it stating that "we would not publish Hatred on Steam", when of course they have the Postal games, which are just as openly about violence for violence's sake.

Here's what just happened with my thought process:

I was annoyed by this move by valve and was going to moan about censorship. This only lasted about half a second then I thought it's not really censorship issue.

Then I thought "but valve of course have a right to publish what they want and they might not want to be associated with this, especially given the racists in the Dev team". This isn't a big deal as the game will be available elsewhere.

I briefly wondered if they published Postal but concluded probably not.

Then I was going to defend valve by saying the above,whilst agreeing with Zoks argument.

Now I read your post and I have to say it's a bit odd being agaisnt Hatred but selling and profiting off Postal, a game which is infamous as a crazy mass murder kill-em-up.

Still, they've a right not to publish obviously,esepcially with the known racist Dev members, but publishing Postal does make it less clear cut on any notion of this being about controversy over the violence.

Anyway I still retain my personal interest in Hatred, in part because it will annoy all the right people, but then I'm not planning to give the devs any money.

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Well, it's not hard to see Valve being cautious about Hatred, because it obviously apes real-world murderous sprees. If someone goes on a rampage and there's a link to the game, there isn't a great deal of wriggle room (regardless of any number of sensible debates that could be had around the subject).

No Russian is, I think, quite different. You can indeed treat it as an opportunity for public slaughter, but I don't think that's the intention. Whether it was a wise inclusion in a CoD game is another matter, but I think it's a really interesting inclusion and one that can be defended. Hatred doesn't have any defence beyond "it's just a game" - which you may well believe is defence enough, but I expect Valve are considering this as a business / image decision more than a philosophical issue. As with Target and GTA, they clearly think the potential outrage among gamers is worth the gamble.

Interesting one, not easy. I've said above that I think there are elements of GTA that are hard to defend, particularly to the general public who might lack some contextual experience / knowledge. I very much doubt I'd want Hatred out there as the public face of video games - that doesn't mean I think it should be 'banned' (which it isn't, anyway), it just makes for tough thinkin'.

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No Russian is just as 2edgy4me controversy courting as anything else.

It doesn't even make any sense as part of the plot, even an attempt at subtle-as-a-brick demonising of the bad guy doesn't work because he never gets his comeuppance, instead disappearing as the plot goes sideways into building Outer Heaven.

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I think the Hatred thing comes down to tone, but that's really besides the point. I support any developer's freedoms to make whatever they want (as long as they're not actually breaking laws), I may not like it or agree with it but I will stand by their right to make it because that is the same right that lets me make the games I want. And by the same token I have no problem with any retailer/company deciding not to carry a product, they have absolutely no obligation to carry it, there are many games Valve hasn't let on Steam. I expect the reason behind this is letting it on Steam will cause them a bunch of negative PR. I'm against censorship, but Steam not carrying the game isn't censorship - it's not stopping the game being made, it's not forcing content change(s) to the game, it's not stopping the game being sold by others.

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It's tough, because in order to make any objection to the content of the game, you are taking a moral standpoint. And it's one that would make the vast majority of gamers hypocrites.

It highlights the avoidable truth that the majority of violent games are unquestionably sick from any reasonable moral standpoint, and people don't like that.

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It's a massive PR bomb waiting to happen, seems like a pretty easy decision for Valve they either accept a (probably) shit game onto their service and accept all the risk when some nutjob goes and shoots up a school and a news reporter finds it in his Steam library or they just don't and everyone forgets about it in a week. It's not censorship at all, it's a company looking after their own interests.

I think because it's from a small foreign studio too Valve would get the majority of the shit if something does happen, they're a much bigger and more exposed target than some company no one has heard of.

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