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Mark of the Ninja - 360 & PC - 2D stealth - Metacritic 90 - Buy this game!


Timmo
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I've had that with the bodies, sometimes if a ledge inside a vent is too close to the vent entrance, you automatically drop the body and don't get the bonus, you have to pick up the body again and throw, move it again.

Absolutely minor and I wouldn't want to take anything away from it as it's quality and just 'works' better than most games, let alone most stealth games.

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I've had that with the bodies, sometimes if a ledge inside a vent is too close to the vent entrance, you automatically drop the body and don't get the bonus, you have to pick up the body again and throw, move it again.

Absolutely minor and I wouldn't want to take anything away from it as it's quality and just 'works' better than most games, let alone most stealth games.

Yeah it's absolutely minor...unless you're trying to knock Karzee off the top of your friends list leaderboards on every game you own for the last few years...:P

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Really? Finished it myself last night and I thought the length was pitched perfectly. And I normally consider myself ridiculously impatient when it comes to that kind of thing.

I think part of the brilliance of this game is that it never rests on it's laurels - there seems to be a new mechanic or enemy or skill added immediately after you get used to the last one.

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Slow playing this trying for scores really shows how much they have thought about it. Last night I tried to up my best on the first level by using Path of the Hunter, and managed to crawl a couple of places up to 8th, then tried again again and used the standard Path Of The Ninja.

4th!

Must- stop- playing -

But as the entire game can be ran through in a couple of hours it cant really be called value for money

Dishonoured Thread

;)

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Only just heard of this, and it sounds amazing. I'm probably looking at the PC version so I can play on a laptop, but I haven't used Steam for years. Can anyone advise if it is fairly straight forward to hook up a PS3 pad to play this? Looking around, people seem to be talking about Motion Joy to use a PS3 pad on Steam, but there are some reports of issues. I'm pretty clueless I'm afraid.

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I see an Xbox Live gamertag in your sig. If that is a wired 360 controller then you only have to plug it in, and it'll work. Button prompts and all, if it weren't for the resolution you'd think you were playing the 360 version. If you have a wireless 360 controller then you need a wireless dongle - and no, connecting with the charging cable does NOT work.

A wireless dongle costs money though, so getting your PS3 controller to work is the cheapest option even if you'll be missing out on proper in-game (ie button prompts and properly calibrated analogue sticks) controller support. But I have no experience with that, sorry :(

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It's almost more puzzle game than anything else. I'm still a pretty rubbish ninja but getting killed in a room leads you to experiment and try a different tact. At one point I'd been killed about six times when I suddenly realised I could just sail past all and sundry without anyone having to die (most importantly, me).

Really, really nicely done.

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Only just heard of this, and it sounds amazing. I'm probably looking at the PC version so I can play on a laptop, but I haven't used Steam for years. Can anyone advise if it is fairly straight forward to hook up a PS3 pad to play this? Looking around, people seem to be talking about Motion Joy to use a PS3 pad on Steam, but there are some reports of issues. I'm pretty clueless I'm afraid.

Motion Joy was a real pain to get working but it's pretty easy now, I use it for Dark Souls with no problems.

Get it from here, plug the controller in with the charging cable and let Windows find it. Start Motion Joy, then go to driver manager where you should have something under "hardware location" as below, tick the box and load driver, Windows will say it's not certified and do you want to install just say yes. Once installed go back to profiles and press enable, I also set it to Xbox 360 emulator.

If your PS3 is plugged in you will need to make sure you press disconnect before you unplug the controller, otherwise when you do the controller will turn the PS3 on.

motionjoy.jpg

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Motion Joy was a real pain to get working but it's pretty easy now, I use it for Dark Souls with no problems.

Get it from here, plug the controller in with the charging cable and let Windows find it. Start Motion Joy, then go to driver manager where you should have something under "hardware location" as below, tick the box and load driver, Windows will say it's not certified and do you want to install just say yes. Once installed go back to profiles and press enable, I also set it to Xbox 360 emulator.

If your PS3 is plugged in you will need to make sure you press disconnect before you unplug the controller, otherwise when you do the controller will turn the PS3 on.

motionjoy.jpg

Great, thanks.

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  • 1 month later...

Finally got round to this and it really is quite special isn't it? It’s probably the most perfectly structured and balanced videogame I’ve played this year and easily the most fun.

The atmosphere when playing this at night in a dark room is incredibly evocative. Those stabs of Eastern music, the guard chatter and Ora’s velvet tones together with the art style, character animations and cut-scenes, it's all an utter joy. Other voice acting is of questionable quality but not immersion-breaking.

It’s punishing but fair with checkpoints in all the right places. Instead of that frustrated relief I feel during games like MGS and Splinter Cell, getting past a tricky laser beam/dog/armed guard scenario is probably the most empowering feeling of bad assery I’ve experienced since Arkham City.

All the usual tropes of stealth games are there like figuring out the guard routines, stealthy kills and alarm-driven escapes but they are all executed so brilliantly and the balance of feeling like a bad ass ninja with a constant threat of getting caught is pitched so perfectly. As the guard intelligence goes up and your environment becomes harder to navigate, it awards you with the right tools but never forces you to use them and leaving the guards alive is as satisfying as a stealth kill. Even the relatively innocuous addition of the awarding of points for remaining undetected means every approach seems worthwhile.

I’m up to about level 6 or 7 now and I can’t think of any moments that left me annoyed or frustrated, that’s amazing to an impatient gamer like me.

I thought there was one moment with an unfair dart section but turns out I should have used my ‘foresight’ power.

I really could go on and on about this, I haven’t mentioned the intuitive and inventive controls, the fun achievements, the awesome challenge rooms, the intriguing story.....blah blah blah....

Game of the year, no question.

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Its in my top 2 GOTY so far, the other being Borderlands 2 I think.

Its lasting appeal is amazing, to get close to the top in the leaderboards demands a long, slow, thoughtful (and often experimental) play through a level. But thanks to the generous mid-level save points it isn't a frustrate-a-thon - thank goodness, as some of the levels are fairly hefty in length.

Glorious stuff.

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Finally got round to this and it really is quite special isn't it? It’s probably the most perfectly structured and balanced videogame I’ve played this year and easily the most fun.

It's superb. I really, really enjoyed it. "Perfectly structured and balanced" is just right.

There's a concept in meta-heuristics, a branch of computer science theory, of "local optima". A local optimum is a solution to a problem where if you change any one part of the solution, the quality of the solution is diminished. If you change lots of things, you might get a better solution -- but it'll be a different solution entirely, not an improvement on what you used to have. I often think of my favourite games and movies being local optima. So for example The Avengers was, to me, a film that might not be the best film ever -- but it was the best it could be at what it was, if you see what I mean.

Mark of the Ninja is like that. There's no thing I can imagine changing that would improve it.

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That's a brilliant improvement and great summary:

Pros: Everything

Cons: Can't stab dogs.

I hope this gets a sequel and more devs pay attention to the stuff in the link Smitty posted, a huge part of the reason this game is so good is because it all works and you can always understand the mechanics, I've never felt 'robbed' by anything in the game at all, which certainly happens in most 3D stealth games. Or at some point the rules slightly change because of some sort of storyline moment, which then doesn't make it as cohesive as this consistently is.

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Yeah, and spike mines will kill them too. But you cant stab them like you can stab human enemies.

This is because you're a Ninja, not a monster.

Poor dogs...I felt bad knocking them out!

And thanks to Smitty for the link, read some good stuff of that already.

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