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crisy
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And you must know what I'll say in response to that is: Fine, fair enough to them, that's understandable, but at the very least Sega could #GiveYuTheShenmueLicense and give us a fighting chance, be that through Kickstarter or some other possible means.

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And you must know what I'll say in response to that is: Fine, fair enough to them, that's understandable, but at the very least Sega could #GiveYuTheShenmueLicense and give us a fighting chance, be that through Kickstarter or some other possible means.

I'm sure they would if he asked for it, and they approached him with a sensible licencing deal. But that isn't going to happen because he has no financial backing to make a Shenmue sequel.

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The SEGA that put out some amazing games last year? Yep. Won't happen though. People should just get over it and play the Yakuza series.

What came out in the last year? I'm genuinely struggling to think of any :unsure:

I've got Binary Domain and Sonic All Stars Racing Transformed.

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To brutally honest. as much as I enjoyed Shemue back in the day: Yakuza is about a million times better than Shenmue ever was or has the potential of ever being even with a budget twice that of The Old Republic.

I'm always confused when people say this kind of thing. Not because Yakuza isn't great, but well, it's really not much like Shenmue at all. It's a great game in it's own right, but it just doesn't provide what Shenmue did. Shenmue is a very slow burning tale full of mystique, and it's obsessively detailed world is one that feels more real and nuanced than Yakuza's. It's simply about losing yourself in the settings and story, it's hardly "gamey" at all. Yakuza by comparison is much more of a traditional game, interrupting your flow with street fights every other minute, and while the stories are always of a high standard, they are also completely OTT and unbelievable in every respect. Both great games, but while they share some DNA, they really couldn't be much more different.

Anyway, thanks to everyone who took a minute to participate today, it looked as though the turnout was pretty good :)

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Also, and I can't stress this enough, in that Sonic Racing vote, Ryu is currently neck-and-neck with that awesome classic character, Hatsune Miku from Vocaloid, with Segata Sanshiro and fucking Vectorman in third and forth. Sonic Racing DLC is clearly where Sega sends characters people have never heard of to die.

Hatsune Miku is massive dude.

...this tweetathon is about getting the rest of the world to listen.

What you don't seem to get is that the rest of the world has actual things to care about.

I had to google Hatsune Miku and it's the creepiest damn thing I've seen all year.

People have made it weird. The actual games are amazing.

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Crisy, you seem very genuine about this and that's admirable - but your reasons so far haven't drifted farther than "it's been a long time" and "I really want one". Sorry but none of your reasons (such as the Sega DLC survey) carry any weight at all; the fact that Segata Sanshiro was even in contention proves that the survey was clearly the domain of Sega nerds like us.

Another example; you say your hashtag had a good turnout? A Shenmue game needs to sell about 3 million copies to break even. As posting on Twitter is instantaneous and free, whereas actually buying and playing a new Shenmue game costs £40 and takes hours, one can expect that you can throw away 90% of your responses immediately, leaving only the hardcore who'd actually buy it. Did you have 30 million responses? As that's the point it begins to look viable (not a good investment, merely a viable one). Anything fewer and believe me, you're damaging your own prospects.

It's like that Dizzy kickstarter recently; not only did it not happen (raising a fraction of the budget requested) but it actually did the opposite - it's settled any arguments about there being this "grassroots undercurrent" of Dizzy fans, and proved the IP is what many of us already knew - that it's an obscure relic of an older gaming era and not worth pursuing today.

I just can't see it ever happening - or if it does, the game will end up being a low cost freemium card game on iOS, or something. It won't be Shenmue. It depresses me too because I really liked the original - but that era of gaming is over.

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I like Hatsune Miku :wub:

I wouldn't give much significance to a figure being produced. There's loads of obscure games and animes and what not that get figures made. usually in small numbers and for a high price. Because the audience isn't really that big.

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It's like that Dizzy kickstarter recently; not only did it not happen (raising a fraction of the budget requested) but it actually did the opposite - it's settled any arguments about there being this "grassroots undercurrent" of Dizzy fans, and proved the IP is what many of us already knew - that it's an obscure relic of an older gaming era and not worth pursuing today.

I think you're vastly underestimating the interest for Shenmue there. It's not fucking Dizzy - if Yu Suzuki started a Kickstarter for a million or so pounds it would get there a lot faster than even even Elite Dangerous did. If all our dreams came true and a new Shenmue was announced at E3 for the next gen consoles and it looked good it would be a massive deal, and have buzz all over the Internet.

That said, crisy should still definitely get over it. Shenmue's not going to happen because of a host of personal and managerial reasons, none of which look like resolving. Just move on.

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I think you're vastly underestimating the interest for Shenmue there. It's not fucking Dizzy - if Yu Suzuki started a Kickstarter for a million or so pounds it would get there a lot faster than even even Elite Dangerous did. If all our dreams came true and a new Shenmue was announced at E3 for the next gen consoles and it looked good it would be a massive deal, and have buzz all over the Internet.

My Dizzy example was perhaps poorly chosen as you're right, a Shenmue game would certainly raise more than that - but whilst Wikipedia isn't always true, but it suggests that Shenmue 1&2 had a combined budget of $95 million. Given, it was probably over budgeted as it was something of a flight of fancy, but I'd still say a million quid is still only a tiny fraction of the necessary cost of a proper Shenmue 3.

I seriously doubt if Suzuki did a kickstarter for the money he'd need to augment Sega's own funds to do it (probably 5 million at least) they'd get anywhere near enough cash. Whereas you see a hypothetical Shenmue 3 for the next gen consoles as "generating a massive buzz" or "being a massive deal", I see it as something that'd excite 20k fans on the internet, whilst the next Elder Scrolls comes out and sells 4 million copies.

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This whole thing with Crisy has actually made me wonder a lot about how we regard video games and their relative success. In my post above, I disagreed with Comrade about whether or not Shenmue 3 would actually "be a big deal", which is part of it too.

I think in the days before the internet (or at least before its use became widespread), most hardcore gamers read video games magazines, and to an extent, we took their opinions as fact, because their editorial goal of selling mags was, in part, achieved by pleasing their readership - so, for example, Sega Saturn Magazine please Sega fans by saying the Saturn version of Wipeout was as good as the PS1 version (which we now all know to be a falsehood). Additionally, the staffers of old mags like SSM, MAXIMUM and the like were gamers themselves, and as a result, they wrote from a perspective that we could relate to. You'd be forgiven if you were an SSM fan for thinking that Virtua Fighter was a massively popular game, as opposed to being relatively obscure.

The advent of the internet as a medium changes the climate a great deal, because traffic is more measurable and people seek out content rather than reading the views that the magazines put in front of them. Given, Kotaku and the like still get to champion games like Dark Souls or some random indie title on Steam, but they never get the kind of coverage they might have got in the old mag days (except of course for genuine enormous grassroots successes like Minecraft).

This all makes me believe that today, we almost certainly have an innately better idea of what games are actually a big deal, as opposed to which ones a group of hardcore journo nerds say are the biggest games of the year, and this is an example. Really, stepping outside of that magazine-informed world we used to live in for games coverage, was Shenmue successful in modern terms?

How many copies did it sell? I'm actually genuinely curious. VGChartz says around a million but I don't know if you can trust it for retro titles.

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