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The SEGA that put out some amazing games last year? Yep. Won't happen though. People should just get over it and play the Yakuza series.

What about if you've played that particular series and found it a bit like somebody recommending Chocolate when you prefer Cheese?

What next, a recommendation to play Sleeping Dogs instead of Shenmue 2 :P

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What about if you've played that particular series and found it a bit like somebody recommending Chocolate when you prefer Cheese?

What next, a recommendation to play Sleeping Dogs instead of Shenmue 2 :P

Sleeping Dogs is very different to Shenmue, yes - but in case of Yakuza and Shenmue it's more like recommending a cheeseburger to somebody who likes hamburgers. Personally, I like the cheeseburger even better, because it has an extra layer of great tasty gameplay to go along with its immersive meaty setting, but fair enough if you disagree :P

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Sega, just hurry the fuck up and release I + II on XBLA already. My Dreamcast has packed up and I would love to play them again in HD with achievements and a bit of love put into them, and who knows, if they are priced fairly and sell well they could actually gauge an interest in whether it's a franchise worth reviving.

Also I want to hear that beautiful music pumping through my surround sound as opposed to the 14" bush TV speaker I had to put up with back in 2001.

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Surely this is easily solved - the main Shenmue guy (is that Yu Suzuki?) should just do a Kickstarter for £100M. If he raises that, the game will get made.

By the way, as much as I liked Yakuza (the first one), Shenmue is a million times better. No idea what the others are like.

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The greatest trick Yu Suzuki ever pulled was to not finish the Shenmue series so that gamers filled with hope that it will be concluded one day don't have time to look back and realise it was actually a bit shit.

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The music for Tomato Convenience Store alone is better than the last ten years of games put together, and that is a natural fact.

1 in 4 of this man's crazy declarations are bang on the money. This is one of them.

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This all makes me believe that today, we almost certainly have an innately better idea of what games are actually a big deal, as opposed to which ones a group of hardcore journo nerds say are the biggest games of the year, and this is an example. Really, stepping outside of that magazine-informed world we used to live in for games coverage, was Shenmue successful in modern terms?

How many copies did it sell? I'm actually genuinely curious. VGChartz says around a million but I don't know if you can trust it for retro titles.

I've mainly only seen the same kind of statistics as you have, but it seems that Shenmue was one of the top selling titles on the Dreamcast. Yes, it was still a financial failure (or so I'm lead to believe at least), but the reasons for that are clear and quite unique to it's time: it was released on Dreamcast, and it cost an astronomical amount to produce. There just wasn't a big enough Dreamcast install base to realistically make a decent profit of off a game that took as much money to produce as Shenmue did.

A new Shenmue game wouldn't suffer from either of those issues. I don't think many genuinely believe or expect to see a Shenmue 3 as lavish by today's tech standards as the original game was by it's. Therefore I absolutely believe that a Shenmue 3 could certainly produce a healthy profit. Shenmue wasn't really a game that inspired people to go out and buy a dedicated games console just to play it on, but it is a game that I think many people would be curious about and want to try. More people now own games consoles than back in those days, and despite Shenmue having somewhat of a reputation as a hardcore gamer's darling, I think it could appeal to many non-traditional gamer types precisely because of it's lack of "gameyness" as it were. I've met quite a few very casual or even non-gamers who took quite a shine to the game. I also agree with Comrade, in that Shenmue 3 could definitely fetch a top draw Kickstarter fund, there always seems to be more interest and passion in Shenmue than other retro gaming curios, it's never quite quietly faded away like other cult titles have. And whenever there's a poll for anything that's even nearly related to it, Shenmue seems to consistently top them. I also think that having had over decade to gestate and gain an almost mythical reputation amongst gamers, could even work for it, in a funny way.

Of course I know as well as anyone that nothing is certain and that the future of Shenmue is in a precarious position. But I think that Shenmue 3 becoming a reality is very possible, and I'm the type of person that likes getting proactive, I was brought up believing that protest's can work. Obviously I know Shenmue is hardly the most pressing issue in the world today, but nor is sending a tweet once a month the most demanding or time consuming of actions.

The tweetathon the other day went well by the way, here's the write up on it if anyone's interested: http://www.facebook....568329816512395

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I'm the type of person that likes getting proactive

Then be proactive, do something to make it happen at the moment what you're doing is the gaming equivalent of copying a status on Facebook to end world hunger. Start a company/fund to raise the money required to license Shenmue from Sega. Get a job at Sega and work your way to a position where you can influence these decisions. If you're proactive then go and do something to make it happen, all you're doing at the moment is telling other people to do something (creativity, hard work, risk) and that is not the same thing - you're the heckler yelling at the stage.

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Then be proactive, do something to make it happen at the moment what you're doing is the gaming equivalent of copying a status on Facebook to end world hunger. Start a company/fund to raise the money required to license Shenmue from Sega. Get a job at Sega and work your way to a position where you can influence these decisions. If you're proactive then go and do something to make it happen, all you're doing at the moment is telling other people to do something (creativity, hard work, risk) and that is not the same thing - you're the heckler yelling at the stage.

Or he could not do any of these only marginally less ridiculous things and just accept that sometimes you don't get what you want and artistic works often go unfinished.

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I've mainly only seen the same kind of statistics as you have, but it seems that Shenmue was one of the top selling titles on the Dreamcast. Yes, it was still a financial failure (or so I'm lead to believe at least), but the reasons for that are clear and quite unique to it's time: it was released on Dreamcast, and it cost an astronomical amount to produce. There just wasn't a big enough Dreamcast install base to realistically make a decent profit of off a game that took as much money to produce as Shenmue did.

A new Shenmue game wouldn't suffer from either of those issues. I don't think many genuinely believe or expect to see a Shenmue 3 as lavish by today's tech standards as the original game was by it's. Therefore I absolutely believe that a Shenmue 3 could certainly produce a healthy profit. Shenmue wasn't really a game that inspired people to go out and buy a dedicated games console just to play it on, but it is a game that I think many people would be curious about and want to try. More people now own games consoles than back in those days, and despite Shenmue having somewhat of a reputation as a hardcore gamer's darling, I think it could appeal to many non-traditional gamer types precisely because of it's lack of "gameyness" as it were. I've met quite a few very casual or even non-gamers who took quite a shine to the game. I also agree with Comrade, in that Shenmue 3 could definitely fetch a top draw Kickstarter fund, there always seems to be more interest and passion in Shenmue than other retro gaming curios, it's never quite quietly faded away like other cult titles have. And whenever there's a poll for anything that's even nearly related to it, Shenmue seems to consistently top them. I also think that having had over decade to gestate and gain an almost mythical reputation amongst gamers, could even work for it, in a funny way.

Of course I know as well as anyone that nothing is certain and that the future of Shenmue is in a precarious position. But I think that Shenmue 3 becoming a reality is very possible, and I'm the type of person that likes getting proactive, I was brought up believing that protest's can work. Obviously I know Shenmue is hardly the most pressing issue in the world today, but nor is sending a tweet once a month the most demanding or time consuming of actions.

The tweetathon the other day went well by the way, here's the write up on it if anyone's interested: http://www.facebook....568329816512395

They also released a Shenmue game on this obscure US console called the Xbox, and it sold even worse.

This isn't a protest, by the way, it's people whining on the Internet that they want someone to take a gigantic financial and personal risk and spend three to seven years of their life making a videogame.

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I've mainly only seen the same kind of statistics as you have, but it seems that Shenmue was one of the top selling titles on the Dreamcast. Yes, it was still a financial failure (or so I'm lead to believe at least), but the reasons for that are clear and quite unique to it's time: it was released on Dreamcast, and it cost an astronomical amount to produce. There just wasn't a big enough Dreamcast install base to realistically make a decent profit of off a game that took as much money to produce as Shenmue did.

A new Shenmue game wouldn't suffer from either of those issues. I don't think many genuinely believe or expect to see a Shenmue 3 as lavish by today's tech standards as the original game was by it's. Therefore I absolutely believe that a Shenmue 3 could certainly produce a healthy profit. Shenmue wasn't really a game that inspired people to go out and buy a dedicated games console just to play it on, but it is a game that I think many people would be curious about and want to try. More people now own games consoles than back in those days, and despite Shenmue having somewhat of a reputation as a hardcore gamer's darling, I think it could appeal to many non-traditional gamer types precisely because of it's lack of "gameyness" as it were. I've met quite a few very casual or even non-gamers who took quite a shine to the game. I also agree with Comrade, in that Shenmue 3 could definitely fetch a top draw Kickstarter fund, there always seems to be more interest and passion in Shenmue than other retro gaming curios, it's never quite quietly faded away like other cult titles have. And whenever there's a poll for anything that's even nearly related to it, Shenmue seems to consistently top them. I also think that having had over decade to gestate and gain an almost mythical reputation amongst gamers, could even work for it, in a funny way.

Of course I know as well as anyone that nothing is certain and that the future of Shenmue is in a precarious position. But I think that Shenmue 3 becoming a reality is very possible, and I'm the type of person that likes getting proactive, I was brought up believing that protest's can work. Obviously I know Shenmue is hardly the most pressing issue in the world today, but nor is sending a tweet once a month the most demanding or time consuming of actions.

The tweetathon the other day went well by the way, here's the write up on it if anyone's interested: http://www.facebook....568329816512395

I've done a bit of looking around after you said this.

It was indeed one of the top selling games of the console, which I dont think says much as many of the most fondly remembered games on there (like JSR, Skies of Arcadia and Samba De Amigo) arent massive blockbuster titles that would sell in massive numbers. In fact, I dont think there were many, certainly not on the level of, say, a Final Fantasy, or the Fifa series (which never appeared on the DC if I remember right).

While a new Shenmue game wouldnt suffer from being on a console with a small user base, I dont think you really know how much it would cost which is one thing you do a lot - base things off what you think or feel rather than give anything to support it, and I think a lot of the time you come across as slightly blinkered because of your cause. I mean, do you even know how much it would cost to make a game on the scale of what people would expect from Shenmue 3 today? People talk about using Kickstarter, but I'm sure it would have to break the current record kickstarter at the moment (which is a bit over $10 million dollars, if I recall).

This sense of "I think/feel" is apparent all through your post. For example, you say there always seems to be more passion about Shenmue than other cult games, but surely as the slightly obsessive (no offense, but its how you come across at times) Shenmue fan, you tend to almost seek out places or people who share this? Or as you are quite vocal about it they tend to respond? As someone who actually worked in game retail at the time of its release, I came across a number of people who traded it in saying it was boring, and only a few people I worked with really loved the game. Speaking to people now, I know as many people who enthuse about games like Eternal Darkness or PSO than I do Shenmue. Personally, I think you see it more because you look for it more, to me it doesnt seem any more prevalent. Then you say about polls in a vague sense ("even nearly related to it" - what do you mean there? related to what? "cult" games? Shenmue itself? Dreamcast games?) So I even went and had a google search for some lists of various things it could be on. I looked at top retro games, cult games, dreamcast games, and a few others, and found one list it topped. I'm sure there are more, but I'd probably already spent more time searching than I should have. Hell, IGN even did a list of top 25 DC games where they had a seperate page explaining why they havent got Shenmue in the top 25 at all.When you do give examples, they're things like a Ryo statue or him winning a poll to be in Sonic Racing, but then you follow it with a leap like "does this mean Sega realise that there is a want for more Shenmue?? I think it does!". Though realistically, isnt this a bad thing, because if they can make money off the Shenmue name without making an actual full blown game, doesnt that make it less likely that they'll give the license to Yu?

The thing is, a third Shenmue on new hardware would suffer from something the Xbox one did, which would be that there is no way to continue your character. Part of the reason that didnt do well was that people who wanted it pretty much bought the DC one so they could carry their save over. The appeal outside that group wasnt that large, coupled with the Xbox selling poorly in Japan. Maybe that would help it find new fans, but I also think that some fans would be upset they didnt have their Ryo or collectables.

I dont know. I love Shenmue. If there was a kickstarter by Yu saying he was going to do it properly, I'd put my £40 down now. Hell, I'd probably put down more. But I dont think tweeting a hashtag is going to do anything, and I think all you are doing by popping up every so often to bump old topics to ask people to wouldnt be so bad, but I just dont agree with a lot of the reasoning or arguments you put forward.

I know that sounds harsh, but I honestly wish you all the best, as one fan of the series to another. But I really think you should look at alternate avenues to it, or just move on.

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Sleeping Dogs is very different to Shenmue, yes - but in case of Yakuza and Shenmue it's more like recommending a cheeseburger to somebody who likes hamburgers. Personally, I like the cheeseburger even better, because it has an extra layer of great tasty gameplay to go along with its immersive meaty setting, but fair enough if you disagree :P

I'd make the case that it's pretty much the same sort of stupid comparison, the similarities between the 3 game series are all very surface level.

  • Set somewhere in an approximation of real life Asia.
  • Cinematic-stylings.
  • Main protagonist is Asian.
  • Fist fighting features prominently
  • Open-world styled

On those sorts of metrics, Sleeping Dogs is the obvious choice for people looking for a fix as it's superior in most of those aspects :P , but would be of no use to anybody who wants a to play more games with the same flavour as either of the other 2 series being discussed.

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All you're doing at the moment is telling other people to do something (creativity, hard work, risk) and that is not the same thing - you're the heckler yelling at the stage.

I don't think giving Yu the Shenmue license requires any creativity, hard work or risk. We know Yu suzuki wants to make Shenmue and also know he wants the license, and I believe that crowd sourcing could offer genuine possibilities. We are not actually asking for any effort of Sega, I mean I'd be delighted if they could re-release Shenmue alongside all the other DC games they have already re-released, but if not they could make a whole lot of us happy by letting go of an IP license they are making nominal profits from, and thus opening up options for what can done. Do you really think this is completely unreasonable beyond question?

Yeah, it all sounds about as proactive and effective as tweeting Roger Waters and Dave Gilmour to reform Pink Floyd and go on a world tour. "Hey! If enough people do it, they can't ignore us!"

No, it's really not. Do Roger Walters and Dave Gilmour actually want to reform Pink Floyd and go on a world tour?

They also released a Shenmue game on this obscure US console called the Xbox, and it sold even worse.

And again, the reasons for it's failure are pretty blatant, to the point where you have to wonder what Sega were thinking in regards to it. The Xbox was a new console, it was nowhere near as successful as PS2, and I would take the educated assumption that Shenmue would have found a much more receptive gamer demographic on that latter console. Not only this, but they released Shenmue 2 without the first game (just a really poor "movie" of the cutscenes), which would mean that Xbox owners would have had to go and buy an old DC and Shenmue to really experience the story. With current consoles a downloadable re-release could be made easly available.

This isn't a protest, by the way, it's people whining on the Internet that they want someone to take a gigantic financial and personal risk and spend three to seven years of their life making a videogame.

I've already dealt with this accusation earlier in my post. I am fully in support of trying crowd funding, and Yu Suzuki actually wants to make the game.

I dont think you really know how much it would cost which is one thing you do a lot - base things off what you think or feel rather than give anything to support it, and I think a lot of the time you come across as slightly blinkered because of your cause. I mean, do you even know how much it would cost to make a game on the scale of what people would expect from Shenmue 3 today? People talk about using Kickstarter, but I'm sure it would have to break the current record kickstarter at the moment (which is a bit over $10 million dollars, if I recall).

Well of course, I don't work in game's industry myself and I don't have an absolute knowledge of how much it costs to produce a game, but I'm pretty sure a worthy Shenmue 3 could be done on an affordable budget. As I've said previously, most fans wouldn't even expect it to be as technically extravagant as the original Shenmue was when it was first released. It wasn't the super high production values that made Shenmue great, it was the passion that went into it that made it great. The recent game's that remind me most of Shenmue aren't AAA titles, they are games like Deadly Premonition, games that were made on a tight-ish budget but had a lot of love put into it.

The thing is, a third Shenmue on new hardware would suffer from something the Xbox one did, which would be that there is no way to continue your character. Part of the reason that didnt do well was that people who wanted it pretty much bought the DC one so they could carry their save over. The appeal outside that group wasnt that large

I don't think the lack of being able to to carry over your items from Shenmue 2 would alienate many Shenmue at all! That was never really a huge part of Shenmue's appeal, it's not like Mass Effect or anything, that was just a nice little bonus. Could you really imagine as current fan saying "Yes! After all these years Shenmue 3 is being released, but oh wait, I can't carry my decade old save items over, fuck it then I'm out" ?

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I think whoever said no one is willing to bankroll this is totally, totally right.

I say kickstarter it. Try and reach out to Yu Suzuki, say if we raise you a few million or whatever and can buy you the rights will you do it, etc. Donate to a charity if all else fails.

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Apologies for the mega post, it was shorter in my head ;)

I don't think giving Yu the Shenmue license requires any creativity, hard work or risk. We know Yu suzuki wants to make Shenmue and also know he wants the license, and I believe that crowd sourcing could offer genuine possibilities. We are not actually asking for any effort of Sega, I mean I'd be delighted if they could re-release Shenmue alongside all the other DC games they have already re-released, but if not they could make a whole lot of us happy by letting go of an IP license they are making nominal profits from, and thus opening up options for what can done. Do you really think this is completely unreasonable beyond question?

Creativity or hard work I'll give you. No risk as such, but Sega have more to lose by giving, or selling the license than by keeping it and not doing anything with it just on the off chance they might want it later. If you own an IP you want to hold onto it because once it's gone you'll never get it back. You certainly have no reason to give it back to a former employee.

Sega are keeping the license because they are a business. They are not going to give up a license because of any fan group or a former employee, no matter who he is or how many people post a tweet.

And again, the reasons for it's failure are pretty blatant, to the point where you have to wonder what Sega were thinking in regards to it. The Xbox was a new console, it was nowhere near as successful as PS2, and I would take the educated assumption that Shenmue would have found a much more receptive gamer demographic on that latter console. Not only this, but they released Shenmue 2 without the first game (just a really poor "movie" of the cutscenes), which would mean that Xbox owners would have had to go and buy an old DC and Shenmue to really experience the story. With current consoles a downloadable re-release could be made easly available.

Actually, again it makes perfect business sense.

Firstly, the reason they only released Shenmue II and not the first is largely because Shenmue II was released outside Japan very late on when the console was already dead. So Sega basically made the decision that they could at least partially offset the debt that making the original version incurred.With the port largely being aimed at Westerners It was basically a gift to Shenmue I fans that they didn't need to do. The 'movie' only supports this further, it's mostly a refresher, something that Yakuza does as well. It's close enough that a new player can get a good enough summary

Sega's immediate post-DC games were almost all made for either Gamecube or Xbox, for both development and political reasons(Sega were partnering with both Nintendo and Microsoft on arcade hardware. Therefore they had established development chains for these systems as they were both based on the console hardware.) and the PS2 was still in the early days of it's world conquest so the target system wouldn't make much difference. A ps2 port would probably have been a troublesome development and taken too much time and effort. Not welcome with an already debt ridden game. Taking into account the ps2's known technical difficulty and the comparable raw power of the competing systems, the Xbox made better sense as a platform.

As for a modern rerelease, they tend to be mixed blessings. Often they just show up the deficiencies in the original game, amplified by age. That could prove counter productive in Shenmue's case because a lot of niggling things in the original that were dismissible at the time would be more problematic now.

Well of course, I don't work in game's industry myself and I don't have an absolute knowledge of how much it costs to produce a game, but I'm pretty sure a worthy Shenmue 3 could be done on an affordable budget. As I've said previously, most fans wouldn't even expect it to be as technically extravagant as the original Shenmue was when it was first released. It wasn't the super high production values that made Shenmue great, it was the passion that went into it that made it great. The recent game's that remind me most of Shenmue aren't AAA titles, they are games like Deadly Premonition, games that were made on a tight-ish budget but had a lot of love put into it.

Technical extravagency was not only important to Shenmue, it was probably it's biggest selling point. The game was about the enviromental experience and touches, it's what made the game interesting. No one had ever built such a fantastically detailed environment in a game before with the day/night/weather cycles and living city.

Yes not doing all those things would save a lot of time and energy, but it stands a very good chance of robbing any potential new game of it's soul. Take away all of those details and technical systems and what you have is a very short 'game' of A->B->C-A->C->B->Z. It was the details that made the game.

Now, Yakuza is the closest comparison we can make in terms of detail, budget and sales. It's a proven seller (in Japan at least) which becomes increasingly complicated and detailed and has vast sums of money spent on it. It would not be the same game at all if all that detail was removed. The same is true of Shenmue.

You talk about passion and production values but passion only runs so far on good will and determination alone. You NEED money to make Shenmue else you are just spitting in the face of what made it popular in the first place. For original IP you can tailor everything to your means and not concern yourself with high expectations. No such luck for Shenmue

You won't fund such a game with Kickstarter, you need proper investment from a publisher who wants to take the risk. No one will do that in this economical climate when the risk is even higher than it was 12 years ago when Shenmue had it's very well known financial issues.

As much as I can totally understand wanting a revival for a game you enjoy and as much as I can support fan action in asking for it, some of the reasoning seems a bit flawed. Now, if you want to continue the campaign, well only you can decide if it's worth your time and effort. All I can do is offer you good luck. However I think you'll find it impossible to sway any person who is going to look at it in an objective like way. Unfortunately that includes me. I'll go back to my desire to see a full 3d remake of FFVII, however I've long conceded that won't happen.

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Dandy covers the license side. As for creativity & hard work, I assume you want a game out the end of this which will require those things, even if someone wants to make a game it's still a shitload of hard work. Risk comes in terms of money and time (I've been into detail a few times in this thread, so I'll not repeat myself, again). As usual you're asking everyone else to take the risks, put the effort & dedication into creation, whilst you do nothing but tweet saying "you should do that".

Technical extravagency was not only important to Shenmue, it was probably it's biggest selling point. The game was about the enviromental experience and touches, it's what made the game interesting. No one had ever built such a fantastically detailed environment in a game before with the day/night/weather cycles and living city.

God yeah, I remember as a student watching Suzuki's GDC keynote on Shenmue - it was mind blowing. What I really recall is the blossom on the tree :wub:

Edit: found the talk

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You certainly have no reason to give it back to a former employee.

Which is why we take to twitter once a month in an attempt to give them a reason.

So Sega basically made the decision that they could at least partially offset the debt that making the original version incurred.With the port largely being aimed at Westerners It was basically a gift to Shenmue I fans that they didn't need to do

It may have been, but I was responding to the point of why it didn't sell all that well on Xbox. As you point out, it seems that it was only meant for North American fans who had already played the first Shenmue on DC and had an Xbox. But it wouldn't have appealed to gamers who hadn't already played the first and so had no investment in the story, hence the low sales.

Technical extravagency was not only important to Shenmue, it was probably it's biggest selling point. The game was about the enviromental experience and touches, it's what made the game interesting. No one had ever built such a fantastically detailed environment in a game before with the day/night/weather cycles and living city.

Yes not doing all those things would save a lot of time and energy, but it stands a very good chance of robbing any potential new game of it's soul. Take away all of those details and technical systems and what you have is a very short 'game' of A->B->C-A->C->B->Z. It was the details that made the game.

But creating living cities and day night whether cycles, and other such things can surely be done at a more affordable price now. Yakuza might be a closer comparison in terms of budget and sales and such, but personally, I found the world of Deadly Premonition to be much more Shenmue-like (complete with unique NPC's that have their own cycles and all), all it needed to do away with those awkward shooting sections (though they do break up the game play a bit admittedly). It might not have been as jammed packed with stuff as Yakuza's open world is, but in odd way it still felt more detailed. So while I agree that detail is key to Shenmue's appeal, sometimes games with lower budgets can still have more of an eye for it. I'd be more than happy with a Shenmue 3 that runs on an engine as creaky as DP's. I know that Shenmue 3 would have to come with some concessions, but I don't think they would have to rob the game of it's soul.

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Which is why we take to twitter once a month in an attempt to give them a reason

So their reason to do something... Is people saying they should do something without giving a reason?

If someone actually put any effort into this- say, producing a conceptual pitch for Shenmue 3 that shows it's achievable on a budget, or a risk analysis of why it would make sense from a business perspective- I might actually support this. But it's a few dozen people whining on the internet and not actually doing anything. It's Kony 2012 for videogames.

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I never played Shenmue (I will eventually) but you're coming across a bit Field of Dreams, here. You're assuming that everyone who bought into the franchise will come back. Fact of the matter is plenty of people who were gaming back then will have stopped, and many who enjoy the franchise won't have played it at the time but as a retro game.

You say it wouldn't need much investment because it needs atmosphere or something, citing Deadly Premonition as an example. Sega don't want to sell Deadly Premonition, they've already had games like Alpha Protocol and Binary Domain which have had similar struggles at retail. The longer they don't make Shenmue 3, the more it retains this mythical status amongst people who know about it and want it. If a shit or rough game comes out, that's it. They provide you with your closure but that potential has gone.

Sega have done some pretty stupid things over the last decade but on a purely business level, they could keep this on their portfolio in the event of a future buyout and go 'and we have classic IPs ripe for upgrading', so if someone else decides they do want to take the risk to plough their $100m into making this, you've still got that part of the fanbase willing to take a punt just because it's Shenmue 3.

In fact, doing this will only perpetuate any feeling Sega might have to keep their grip on it 'just in case' the future changes.

And believe, there will be people who'll want the moon on a stick when a current generation Shenmue is announced. They'll want it to push the limits of the hardware and give them the same feeling of playing Shenmue the first time - not the feeling of playing the same Shenmue again.

You'd be far better off trying to get Sega to release Shenmue I & II on XBLA/PSN/eShop/Steam to be honest.

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The problem of this whole campaign for me is the 'Give Yu the license' aspect. It's completely misguided, and I think stems from the fact he said recently that he would love to be given the opportunity to finish the game/story.

The problem is not so much giving Yu the license - Yu Suzuki surely doesn't have the money to make the game otherwise Sega would surely have given it to him and handed the risk over to a third party. In my opinion Yu Suzuki wants to finish his personal project with someone else picking up the tab and taking all the risk. It isn't a case of Sega being the bad guy by holding onto their IP when Suzuki wants to work with it. Just listen to what the 'Give Yu' campaign is asking - it's asking (demanding?) that Sega hand over some of their intellectual property (which they have recently started milking again) out of the goodness of their heart to appease some fans.

I am genuinely one of the biggest Shenmue fans in the world and have been since it originally came out, and am also one of the most optimistic when it comes to the hope that one day we might see the story concluded, but this whole campaign completely misses the mark. It comes across as blunt but I have to get it off my chest.

You want Sega to do something with Shenmue? The least you can do is keep the game's profile high by talking about it in forums, and supporting the projects that involve Shenmue/Ryo (All-Stars Racing, the Microsoft Avatar Jacket, etc). Eventually Sega might re-release S1&2 on Xbox Live, and eventually they might take the risk themselves. You really want to make Shenmue 3 happen? Put a budget together for 30 full time dev staff for two years, an office/studio, allow money fo freelance and outsourcing (because with a game the size of Shenmue, you'll need it - 30 full timers will just keep the place ticking over, you'll need to outsource for a great deal of content creation), the cost of dev kits, software licenses, middleware/engine license, etc. Get the money through investment (NOT Kickstarter - you'll need proper investors), then go to Sega with your plan.

The whole kicking and screaming 'Give Yu the license' thing is misguided, rude, and will get Shenmue fans as a collective nowhere other than to look like a bunch of spoiled brats. The capsule toy was fine - geeky but charming, but this one is just embarassing.

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