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Biglime and Eurogamer - Game Over


Daley
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I don't remember anyone back in the AP days calling for the head of Stu Campbell for his review of Secret of the Silver Blades.

They would have done if it was as easy to do so. Back then they would have had to write a proper letter, and even if they did none of us would have found out if the magazine hadn't published it.

Now the idiots have comment sections on articles so the magazine "publishes" everything. And even if it doesn't there's Twitter etc.

I don't think there are more idiots, I think it's a lot easier to be an idiot and they can feed off each other.

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I don't remember anyone back in the AP days calling for the head of Stu Campbell for his review of Secret of the Silver Blades.

Team 17 chucked a massive hissy fit when AP said some of their games were average. And also the Daily Star called for Stu to be sacked, but that was because he said he wished that all war veterans should die or something, rather than because he gave Kick Off 3 a poor score.

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I think the point that is lost on her and others that she's not being malicious, it's just how the industry works and she's a product of that. MCV booted her and found someone else because it's definitely easy to - she's replaceable and if you removed names from their work, harsh reality is you probably couldn't tell who wrote what most of the time.

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You know what, she comes across ok there, she's realised where she fucked up so good luck to her.

tbh, the villain here is probably MCV anyway, not least for sacking her and then boasting about it on Twitter.

Really? I'm not sure she's really clarifying anything, other than saying she regrets some tweets and the email to EG - and that clearly isn't keeping the GAF happy, who are raking everything up again. I don't think her talking about it there is actually doing her any favours, to be honest.

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She started out alright, but instead of answering honestly, she's tried to backtrack and cover things up again. If she had answered everything honestly, and it had transpired that she had been naive in what had happened, it would have worked wonders, but she's taken this opportunity to save face to dodge questions and blame everyone else. Pretty much just nailed her own coffin shut.

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Yeah, towards the end of that thread it doesn't rather start to go downhill again.

I suspect she's just got a personality that doesn't cope well under pressure and when pressure mounted in that thread she paniced.

Which of course what rather caused all this in the first place.

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She doesn't come off well there at all, I would say. She can't resist sticking digs in which cancel out everything else. Comrade mentioned the Hague, certainly they are taking it way too seriously over there on NeoGAF, but still her own comments are rubbish because she wipes out everything she typed by saying something to justify it at the end.

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I'm not sure what she hoped to achieve by going on NeoGAF. of all places, to try and argue her case.

Her rigid insistence that she never made any legal threats and if Eurogamer happened to interpret mentions of libel that way then that was just them being silly reminds me of someone, but I can't remember who, I think they were called Spruce or something.

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I'm not sure what she hoped to achieve by going on NeoGAF. of all places, to try and argue her case.

Well, they are the self appointed bastions of games journalism. There's one line in that thread somewhere where someone says "It shouldn't be up to NeoGAF to call journalism out on its failings and wrongdoing..." and I think that hits the nail on the head in so many different ways.

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"I'm an auditor and we have to..."

I think that's the low. Comparing writing a game preview to auditing a company's books.

Although the comparison between writing a game preview under direction from your boss, and the obvious nazi references were up there.

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This is the saddest thing, I can still pick out most of the old PC Gamer UK staff by writing style alone unless it was just a throwaway rewritten press release article. Tim Stone, Richard Cobbett, KG, John Walker, Jim Rossignol etc all have very distinct voices of their own. I remember one review by Tim Stone he wrote entirely in alliteration. Why? Just because. In an age where news is on every site worldwide within 5m and "exclusives" don't mean a damn any more, you'd think we'd have gotten to a point where writing style was more important, not less.

As for Wainwright, she continues to look incredibly naive in that neogaf thread, a series of thin excuses that don't show a whole lot of understanding why things kicked off like they did.

Definitely. Someone I know through Twitter gushes about Kieron and his comic writing. I have to admit to being totally clueless and I follow him because he will forever be that guy who was the butt of the long hair jokes in PCG and recommended some utterly fantastic games.

I rarely played most of the games that were in PCG but you just seemed to enjoy it vicariously. I could never get Grand Prix Legends to run well on my PC, for example, but the review was great. Can't remember who wrote it, perhaps it was Matt before he became editor. Is it weird I can't remember his surname but I still know he was Mean Mr Mustard?

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I did like this comment:

I think what was interesting was how this was covered. Apart from Kotaku, most outlets made no attempt to gain comment. People's job titles were wrong, things were made up about me, links to my body of work were suggested as other things. A lot of outlets also just linked other blog posts as true sources when in fact those blogs were also just observations. Everyone was kind of winging it. No-one really had the full and true story.

That really is 'welcome to the other side' of games journalism. Not all sites are bad, but fact checking, accuracy and posting corrections isn't a priority for many.

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The much-lauded Kill Screen ran a brief piece (since edited) where they said Geoff Keighley had been pictured with a table of Doritos at the Games Media Awards. The irony in moaning about journalistic ethics without checking facts is apparently beyond them (and a lot of other places at the time).

That Kotaku piece is worth a read, actually. Jim Sterling also wrote quite a balanced piece on the whole affair, although I'm not sure who for (I'm pretty sure it wasn't Destructoid).

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I find Neogaf hilarious

*sigh* Why do you insist on lying? Haven't you learned anything about how internet records never expire.

We've gone from "I never did any articles on Square's content since working for them (though I was never employed by them, I just got paid to do work for them)" to "ok I did write articles but it was just explaining their marketing campaign". Except it wasn't:

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=498090

There was a whole thread on your MCV piece with a very detailed OP.

Incidentally, when did you work Square? Because near the beginning of the thread someone quotes you as saying "2011 - present", and many of your articles came out in late 2011.

Quote:

Hitman was a loved franchise, I'm not mistaken in pointing that out.

Why do you do this? Childishly ignoring the first half of the quote hoping we'll forget it ever existed. You said "It's a triumphant return for a much-loved series with impressive visuals and cinematic story, but it still features the same type of gameplay that made the series so popular." How does that not read like a sales pitch?

And we're very aware that MCV doesn't pitch to consumers, it pitches to retailers. However it doesn't give an accurate impression so they can order the right amount, it hypes up games from publishers that give you enough money (MCV did a joint promo with Squeenix on the Sniper Challenge). Or did you also forget this little doozy:

http://penny-arcade.com/report/edito...ews-re-tweets-

where MCV purposely ignored all the negative Hitman reviews (minus a swipe at Eurogamer for not going with the artificial flow) and the author blew up on twitter saying it wasn't his job to look for reviews when writing an article on reviews, eventually forcing MCV to issue an apology. More of your peers such as RockPaperShotgun joined in to label the shameless promotion of the game as "disgraceful".

garrowslawtalesfromth00.jpg

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its like everything else you get what you pay for...

So ask yourself how much are you paying for the games journalism you receive?

combine the two above and you probably have your answer now.

I don't pay for rllmuk*, but it's full of sincere people with helpful opinions and is awesome. :)

*actually I did once, but that's not the point.

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I don't pay for rllmuk*, but it's full of sincere people with helpful opinions and is awesome. :)

*actually I did once, but that's not the point.

rllmuk isnt a business run to make a profit or indeed games journalism in the traditional(or indeed any) sense. It is a community of people volunteering their opinions on games in a "friendly" environment... no one is paid by anyone etc.

but I assume you are nitpicking as my point is pretty clear.

Im surprised "free" gaming websites are as trustworthy as they are considering they are funded by the industry and not the consumer.

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