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Nintendo Wii U


deKay
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It's called miracast bro, non-idevices and stuff already do it for an alternative to airplaying games to the TV. The shittiness of the Android tablet doesn't really matter unless it's doing the rendering, which it isn't in this hypothetical Wii U to Android setup. It's the same thing the Nvidia shield and upcoming Steambox will use to Stream from your PC to your tablet/phone/steambox etc. The Wii U has a dedicated Miracast chip, some guy has already worked out how to make it stream to his PC instead of the pad, so tablets and phones must be following shortly. I don't know why you'd want to do that, but it's certainly possible.

No it doesn't.

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-secrets-of-the-wii-u-gamepad

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It's cool that they're releasing New Super Luigi U as a disc release too.

Nabbit looks like a fun character to play as - especially for people like my girlfriend. She can just play and enjoy now.

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I'm hoping this was more an update to games we already know about and his cheeky mention of 'see you around E3' will mean we'll get news on other stuff too.

Although at the same time, fuck knows with their current form.

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Yeah it does:

"The technology, co-developed by Nintendo and wireless and broadband communications giant Broadcom, marries run-of-the-mill Wi-Fi with a powerful bit of proprietary software to create a two-way stream of low-latency, high-definition video and controls between the Wii U and its innovative GamePad.

That complex suite of software is designed to mitigate interference and deliver a smooth video signal and communication speeds, said Dino Bekis, senior director of wireless connectivity at Broadcom.

The technology is built on top of something called Wi-Fi Miracast, which Broadcom first developed last summer. It's a system that is specifically designed to deal with interference issues while maintaining liquid fast two-way communication.

It's clearly Miracast (the technology, not the standard) as provided by Broadcom, with a couple of protocol tweaks to keep it proprietary. They don't write these solutions from scratch. Obviously you don't want it streaming as a miracast certified device, or you'll be able to connect the Wii U to other devices out of the box as easily as if you'd pulled a hdmi cable out and plugged it into something else! My point still stands however, the tablet/controller/smartphone/whatever is a thin client for receiving streamed video from elsewhere, whether the tablet is a "shitty android tablet", a Wii U controller or a Razer Edge doesn't really matter. That's the point of thin client solutions.

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No it doesn't.

From Eurogamer:

Custom communication protocols means we can discount previous theories that Nintendo employed the use of Broadcom's streaming video Miracast technology to get the Wii U GamePad working, although there are similarities.

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@Morrius

But this says it isn't:

Custom communication protocols means we can discount previous theories that Nintendo employed the use of Broadcom's streaming video Miracast technology to get the Wii U GamePad working, although there are similarities.

"Video is compressed using h.264 (baseline profile, so no B frames)," Bourdon shares. "Audio is usually uncompressed, but we've found mentions of compressed audio formats in the firmware... We found mentions of [Miracast] when we started working on the GamePad, but it turned out to be false. There is no Miracast anywhere in that GamePad. Audio, video and input streaming is done over custom protocols."

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Custom protocols built by Broadcom for Nintendo, Broadcom built miracast. It'll be miracast in all but name with a couple of digits changed here and there to stop people from hooking it up to Miracast certified devices. It's a technology in itself but it's also a standard, built to combat airplay. What I'm trying to express is that they can say "this isn't miracast" even if it resembles miracast in every single tiny way bar a single digit on the encryption being different to keep it proprietary. Would be interested to find out how similar it is. It's not really the the point I was making though. I was merely responding to someone who thought the Wii U controller had some kind of leg-up over any other wifi-video receiving device for performance. The Wii U controller doesn't have any processing power at all, and the streaming tech won't be any more capable than miracast, it's just proprietary. It does have physical buttons though, maybe that's what he meant :lol:

http://www.broadcom.com/press/release.php?id=s722281

It's the same chips they use in other Miracast certified devices...

Anyway, Nintendo Direct.

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Custom protocols built by Broadcom for Nintendo, Broadcom built miracast. It'll be miracast in all but name with a couple of digits changed here and there to stop people from hooking it up to Miracast certified devices.

Good lord, read it man:

There is no Miracast anywhere in that GamePad. Audio, video and input streaming is done over custom protocols.

I remember reading (an Iwata Asks I think) that Nintendo ploughed a tonne of time into the connection between the console and the gamepad - it was certainly not an easy thing for them to implement apparently so I don't think it's safe to assume that it can just be replicated that easily.

EDIT: Here - http://www.nintendo.co.uk/Iwata-Asks/Iwata-Asks-Wii-U/Wii-U-Wii-U-GamePad/2-One-Solution-for-Multiple-Issues/2-One-Solution-for-Multiple-Issues-654103.html

Certainly doesn't sound like something they just took off the shelf and had working in no time.

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There does seem to be a lot of retroactive hatred for the Wii going on in the US press but if Sony managed to drag the PS3 back from it's poor launch I don't see why Nintendo can't do the same. Look at the 3DS now compared to where it was just 18 months ago.

The difference is third party support, Sony had it, Ninten do not. Same for the 3DS and Wii U comparisons, the former has the biggest Japanese third party title as an exclusive and Nintendo frontloading all their big hitters, while the Wii U doesn't have anything big apart from Sonic and LEGO to complement their Nintendo output.

Anyway, I remember scottcr wondering why journalists (I think he singled out Edge) haven't dug into the EA/Nintendo situation, a journalist for Kotaku actually gave a reply about that:

Let me try to explain this from a journalist's perspective, which will hopefully clarify a few things for the "rah rah video game journalism sucks" crowd.

Every good investigative story begins with a question. What really happened to Aliens: Colonial Marines? What's going on with Doom 4? Why was X-Men Destiny so bad?

In this case, we indeed have an interesting question: Did EA and Nintendo have a relationship that somehow fell apart?

For the curious journalist, there are two ways to try to answer that question.

The first is to go through PR, or PR-attended executive interviews. In this case, EA's PR gave an answer. I don't know whether anyone has asked any executives at Nintendo, but those questions are not always fruitful. If you'd like to see one example of what a conversation like that could look like, you can look at this interview I had with Reggie Fils-Aime about the Wii U and third-party support: http://kotaku.com/5943529/nintendo-d...l-collect-dust

The second way to try to find an answer is to go through back channels and try to use other methods to piece together the story, which takes a ton of time and effort. This likely means identifying and finding people who would be in a position to know this information, then convincing them to tell you, even if it could get them in trouble. The problem with this approach is that it could very well lead nowhere. There may not be much of a story there at all, or it may not actually be very interesting (the Wii U sold poorly, so EA pulled out!), or a journalist could spend hours and hours of digging only to find that he or she can't find any answers because nobody wants to talk.

You're right: a real journalist doesn't just phone PR and consider his/her job done. But a real journalist also knows when a story is worth a substantial time investment, and when it's not. The worst - and I do mean the worst - thing that happens during my job is spending hours on a story that turns out to be a waste of time. For me, investigating stories like how Aliens fell apart or what really happened to Doom 4 were well worth the considerable amount of time they took. But in this case, I can't imagine many journalists think this particular story is worth that kind of time sink. I certainly don't. A business story just isn't all that interesting to all that many people.

And if I'm going to spend time on a business story, I'm much more interested in the dysfunctional Amazon/Nintendo relationship, anyway.

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=57907360&postcount=1064

Originally Posted by GRW810: viewpost.gif
Why isn't the gaming media grilling Nintendo and EA about what wrong with that "unprecedented partnership"? If we got the details of what was supposed to happen and why it hasn't it would be fascinating.

Grilling? Would you like us to tie EA's PR people to a chair and not let them go until they tell us what happened?

Stephen Totilo asked EA about that unprecedented partnership. He wrote up their answer: that they considered that first wave of Wii U support (Madden, ME3, etc) to have delivered on their arrangement. Clearly they don't plan to give any further details.

Maybe one day the real story will come out, from people unafraid to talk, or from people who will talk under condition of anonymity. Hopefully that happens. But to blame the media for not "grilling" executives until they tell us about a failed business deal is asinine.

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