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"an Interactive History Of Video Games"


Mike1812
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has anyone watched the DVD yet? is it any good then? or are you just crapping on about something none of you have seen?

Seeing as nobody has comented on the content I assume that we are all Sunday Sport readers and are lost in the clevage of some buxom lass.

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Except that it is a design classic. Media attention or not.

What is? Tomb Raider? The Lara Croft character?

No and no, respectively.

The first Tomb Raider game, not the character. Lara Croft is dull as fuck. The game, however, is an exceptionally well-designed piece of 3D puzzle-adventure goodness.

So, yes and no, respectively. :huh:

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What is? Tomb Raider? The Lara Croft character?

No and no, respectively.

The first Tomb Raider game, not the character. Lara Croft is dull as fuck. The game, however, is an exceptionally well-designed piece of 3D puzzle-adventure goodness.

So, yes and no, respectively. :huh:

On reflection, fair enough. Classic is an over-used word though.

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So 4 pages of incorrect speculation (nothing prior to '96?!) before anyone has even seen it?

I just finished watching it now. Its pretty good actually. It follows the established (as in may not be utterly scientifically historically spot on) "path of games" - from Pong to Bedroom Coders to Sonic/Mario to Playstation/Wipeout/TR to Halo/EQ to the "next-gen" which apparantly is best represented by HL 2. There is also an all to brief comment on online gaming along the (well tread) lines of whether its "good" - bringing thousands of strangers together or "bad" - alienation/escapism from the real world. The third option - "who cares" was omitted.

There are clickable links (which somehow I missed the first time) which allow you to play Pacman and watch some FMV stuff you will have seen before. The overall presentation is excellent, with some nice merging of the "iconic" 16 bit Mario & Sonic sprites.

My grumble would be the later part felt to much like a advert for up and coming games - the "Halo" link actually takes you to the 12 month old trailer for Halo 2, the "Everquest" link actually shows you a movie of "Lords of Everquest." HL2 gets a lot of attention.

In a perfect world something on arcade/home conversions, retro gaming, Japanese RPGs, even what happened to Sega whilst the PS was in ascendance would have been nice, but I believe its unfair to expect that from this.

I think anything like this in such a high profile Sunday paper is something we should be pleased with, and I hope there's not now another 4 pages of sniping. If Times readers actually bother watching it, it will probably advance "general" gaming knowlege further than all the shit games TV programs have managed since Gamesmaster put together.

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No one has been sniping a piece they haven't read mate. We were mainly discussing the fact that Lara has become the videogaming mascot.

noone can deny that 'she' has done more to raise the profile of games since Tommy Vercetti.

As for the feature, it's actually very good. shame I had to buy the sunday times for it, but thems the breaks.

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She's a she, she's not just a love interest, and she's got some degree of visual stylisation.

Compared to a cartoon plumber on a mission to save a princess? I know what I'd choose.

Is it a-me, Mario?

IT SHOULD HAVE HAD GUNSTAR HEROES AND ELITE AND IKARUGA ON THE FRONT - HARDCORE!!!!!!!!!1111

It's a mainstream (and I use that word non-pejoratively) publication, it has a recognisable mainstream gaming icon on the front. What's the problem? It also sounds quite good, too.

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i just watched it, to be honest it was a bit boring. I'd rather play games than learn about them. pretty average overall then, it wasn't badly done though it just wouldn't appeal to hardcore gamers, and I don't think its meant to.

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So 4 pages of incorrect speculation (nothing prior to '96?!) before anyone has even seen it?

Hell I was expecting six or seven at least.

I just finished watching it now.  Its pretty good actually.  It follows the established (as in may not be utterly scientifically historically spot on) "path of games" - from Pong to Bedroom Coders to Sonic/Mario to Playstation/Wipeout/TR to Halo/EQ to the "next-gen" which apparantly is best represented by HL 2.  There is also an all to brief comment on online gaming along the (well tread) lines of whether its "good" - bringing thousands of strangers together or "bad" - alienation/escapism from the real world.  The third option - "who cares" was omitted.

There are clickable links (which somehow I missed the first time) which allow you to play Pacman and watch some FMV stuff you will have seen before.  The overall presentation is excellent, with some nice merging of the "iconic" 16 bit Mario & Sonic sprites.

I really enjoyed it and it's fairly obvious Poole has contributed some of his time to the writing content. There can't be two of them can there?

My grumble would be the later part felt to much like a advert for up and coming games - the "Halo" link actually takes you to the 12 month old trailer for Halo 2, the "Everquest" link actually shows you a movie of "Lords of Everquest."  HL2 gets a lot of attention.

In a perfect world something on arcade/home conversions, retro gaming, Japanese RPGs, even what happened to Sega whilst the PS was in ascendance would have been nice, but I believe its unfair to expect that from this.

Yes I agree.

I think anything like this in such a high profile Sunday paper is something we should be pleased with, and I hope there's not now another 4 pages of sniping.  If Times readers actually bother watching it, it will probably advance "general" gaming knowlege further than all the shit games TV programs have managed since Gamesmaster put together.

The Times along with The Guardian are probably the two papers I would say that give video games the best exposure with several main articles a year delving into the subject and regular weekly sections in the weekend papers that are actually well written from time to time.

I didn't win the Disneyland competition. Fuck you Mickey Mouse! I guess the Magic will have to come from somewhere else this year.

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Thanks for the comments Valiant.

As an aside did anyone see the piece in today's Mail on Manhunt...Something along the lines of...

THIS GAME IS SICKER THAN GRAND THEFT AUTO VICE CITY!!!11!! WITH GRAPHIC SCENES OF TORTURE AND HYPER VIOLENCE. IT HAS BEEN BANNED IN NEW ZEALAND WHY O WHY HAS IT NOT BEEN BANNED HERE?

One step forward...

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It turns out that this is actually written by Steven Poole, so if you're expecting a reprise of the sort of stuff found in Trigger Happy, you won't be disappointed. The official historical lineage of videogames hence runs:

Spacewar>> Pong>> Space Invaders>> Pac-Man>> Tetris>> Doom>> Wipeout>> Tomb Raider>> Metal Gear Solid>> Half-Life 2

Poole's research is a little lax as usual (describing Miner 2049er as a coin-op, for example), and there are dubious statements (such as 6 of the world's top 13 software developers being British, but no evidence for the claim or mention of what criteria defines "top"), but basically it's pretty on-the-ball, if necessarily superficial, information-wise.

Presentation is very nice - eye-catching, appropriate and slick, with lots of iconic gaming imagery - though there's no easy way to go back to the previous page (you can switch between the five main sections of the history, though) and the unskippable poor-quality FMV section intros are annoying. Interestingly, at one point you can play Pac-Man, in a good but not quite emulation-quality Flash version (authentic-looking, sampled sound), which at no point is in any way acknowledged as being the copyrighted intellectual property of Namco.

(There's a tiny, almost-unreadable link to a website - well, it's not actually a link, unlike most of the History you can't click on it, you have to screw up your eyes to read it then quit and type it manually into a browser - and if you go there, you can play a slightly superior version of the Pac-Man clone and find a small credit to Namco in the tiny print.)

The quality of the history goes out the window after Tomb Raider, and it simply becomes a lengthy ad for Half-Life 2, alongside the usual tosh about online gaming being the future blah blah blah virtual reality blah blah. HL2 is clearly the sponsor paying for the feature - Doom, for example, is described as "the game that would eventually make Half-Life 2 possible".

On the whole, though, it's not a bad little curio. And it's always interesting to see the Sunday Times pioneering the way in piracy/copyright infringement.

Did I miss the thread where you announced your return to rllmuk, Stuart?

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