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Wait. What? (I've just found my first PC model on ebay...)


Droo
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Just taking a (technological) walk down memory lane with the chaps in work. and found this:

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item23258372c1

AT&T 3232 6007 486DX2/66 MHz Globalist 515 Desktop

  • 486DX2 66 MHz
  • 170MB Hard Drive - C:\ no operating system
  • 8 MB Memory 70NS
  • 1.44" Floppy Drive
  • 3 ea ISA Slots
  • 2 ea 9 Pin Serial
  • 25 Pin Parallel
  • 640k Base Memory
  • Cache can be disabled

$(KGrHqZ,!hgFCF2BSE0vBQr995YiDw~~60_3.JPG

I can't get over that it's the price it is!

if it was £40/£50 delivered I'd actually consider buying it for nostalgia purposes. There she is, in all her glory!

I upgraded it with a CD-ROM (Dual Speed), a 14.4kbs external modem...

I remember fiddling with the autoexec, system files, boot disks... Ah, halcyon days!

Anyone care to find a pic of their first love PC?

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Technically I'm still using the first PC I ever bought. Not one single part of it remains though as every part has been incrementally upgraded over the years :D

But, that one does look similar to the ones I first used at college except it had dual 3 1/2" and 5 1/4" slots where the CD-ROM would go.......No internal hard disk and had to boot to MS-DOS from one of the 5.25" floppies. Monochrome black & orange monitor. Oh and not forgetting the "Turbo" button!!!!

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Like a few people here, I had a number of 8-bit computers (Spectrums for me) before I got my first PC. However, I got a PC when all the hipper kids were buying Amigas and Atari STs, so I have everyone so far beaten for spec pauperism (seriously? 486s? LUXURY!)

Feast your eyes...

amstradpc208621.jpg

An Amstrad with:

  • 8 MHz 8086 processor (I could have had a 80286 at 12 MHz if I'd settled for a CGA graphics card)
  • EGA graphics (640×350 resolution, 64 colours)
  • 640 KB RAM
  • 3.5" floppy disk
  • 30 MB "hard card" hard disk (the motherboard had no IDE controllers, so this was a hard drive and a controller integrated onto a single 8 MHz 8-bit ISA bus. Not so many years layer, I would deem ISA to be unfit to house even my sound card, let alone my system's hard drive!)
  • MS-DOS v3.3 (and Windows 2.1, but I quickly uninstalled that)
  • No sound card, just PC speaker burps and bloops
  • 14" monitor

It probably sucked balls, in hindsight, but I was ecstatic at the time. I got it for Christmas and discovered my father had made it print "MERRY CHRISTMAS LOVE FROM MUM AND DAD" every time it booted. I demanded this lameness be removed immediately, and he passed me a DOS manual and told me to do it myself... I had figured out config.sys and autoexec.bat before lunch.

My Amiga owning friends thought it was pitiful and hilarious. For some reason, I stuck with PCs, and they stuck with mocking me, until the fateful day I installed Doom on my 486... the rest was history.

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I got it for Christmas and discovered my father had made it print "MERRY CHRISTMAS LOVE FROM MUM AND DAD" every time it booted. I demanded this lameness be removed immediately

Miserable git. :P

My folks got my brother a US Gold collection for his birthday one year, and had entered "Happy Birthday" at the top of the high score table of Super Cycle.

Any time we knocked it off the table, we entered it again.

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I forgot to mention why we had to upgrade the computer. Street Fighter 2 killed it.

No, really.

I only had a Master System so I used to play SF2 on the PC with a keyboard and PC speaker music. Oh yeah. I'd already broken one keyboard thanks to repeatedly pressing punch and kick when playing with Blanka/Chun Li/Zangief so in hindsight I had warning.

For some reason this particular session was taxing for the computer, as midway through the round the game crashed to DOS but the prompt looked different. Typed 'sf2' again and a shitload of code and commands streamed down the screen, making 7 year old me panic and switch the computer off. Turn it back on...nothing.

Not even DOS.

Shite. Still, not like my dad had research papers he was working on.

Ah.

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My first PC PC was a P60 with 8MB RAM from...

...

ESCOM :facepalm:

It was incredibly overpriced and never really worked as well as it should, mainly because of the sound card causing all the graphics on screen to fuck up into weird colours if you turned on the sound effects in games. It was also as big as a yacht. TBH the only PC I've ever had that has worked properly is this one I'm using right now, and a lovely machine it is too. ^_^

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My first PC PC was a P60

Oooh, that reminds me. The new kid we hired last year (I work at a software house) asked me the other day what "x86" meant. "I understand why it's called x64," he said, "but why isn't it x32?"

Now he's very bright as well as terrifyingly young, so that threw me a bit. It turned out that the first PC he'd ever touched, let alone owned, was a Pentium-II, so he'd simply never been exposed to the 80x86 numbering system.

He's never heard a modem or a fax machine dial, either. Sickening.

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Oooh, that reminds me. The new kid we hired last year (I work at a software house) asked me the other day what "x86" meant. "I understand why it's called x64," he said, "but why isn't it x32?"

Now he's very bright as well as terrifyingly young, so that threw me a bit. It turned out that the first PC he'd ever touched, let alone owned, was a Pentium-II, so he'd simply never been exposed to the 80x86 numbering system.

He's never heard a modem or a fax machine dial, either. Sickening.

To be fair, there is actually no reason why it's called x86, when it's something that looks like it has a mathematical reason (especially now people are referring to things as x64) you do sort of expect there to be a (proper) explanation.

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Mine was...(after a Spectrum, Spectrum +, Atari ST then Amiga 500)

DX2-66

Tseng Labs video card - ET4000 (or something like that)

240MB HDD

8mb Ram

2xCD Rom

Soundblaster Pro

3.5in Floppy drive

13" SVGA Monitor

Desktop Case

Can't recall what else, this was March 1994 - but I didn't get much change out of £1500! And that was unbuilt - I had to get a guy I knew to build it all. I remember having to get someone to drive me (didn't drive at that point) to some really odd warehouse place, maybe in Stourbridge, to get all the parts. You went in and ordered the stuff and then went back out and in another door to another section to collect it all. Took about an hour!

There then followed years of upgrades that generally failed. Bought a modem - it had wrong cable and it took me a week to figure out why it didn't work (Same plugs as a UK cable, different cable loom). I bought a DX4-100 but it ended up being completely incompatible with the motherboard I had at the time, even though I was assured it DID work (It so didn't, completely different voltage). I recall going to what looked like a therapist's house - his son ran some kind of computer business in the front room that was all panelled walls and big books.

Later I upgraded to a Pentium 100 - smashed the on/off switch off the case while putting everything back.

Bought a CD Writer - took me about 30 scrapped discs (which were pricey at the time, around £1.10 each) before someone told me I needed a firmware upgrade to fix the issue

Bought a new motherboard and processor at the same time - motherboard book was laid out wrong so instead of putting the machine into normal use via a jumper, I was actually flashing the bios every time I switched it on!

Bought a pre-built system from a guy I knew in Newcastle but wanted to use my HDD in it. Incompatible - but only sort of. It worked great for X period of time, before just completely locking up the machine. (Turned out to be something to do with power saving).

That was the last machine I ever built/worked on. Since then I've gone strictly for pre-built stuff, occasionally upgrading memory or video cards but nothing else.

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Commodore 16 for me. First PC was an ex-radio rental hunk of shit that was 300 - took it back before a month was up, full refund, and a brand new double-specced PC from silicon was mine ... and my first PC I ever build. Fried my first mobo by screwing it directly to the case... rookie mistake!

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First played with the primary schools Commodore PET. The teachers got some of the nerdy kids in to try it out.

220px-Commodore_4032.jpg

The first game I tried was a noughts-and-crosses game. I managed to get into the code and break it. I was so scared that I had broken the computer itself (I didn't even save the changes).

My first proper computer was the VIC-20.

vic20.jpg

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Like a few people here, I had a number of 8-bit computers (Spectrums for me) before I got my first PC. However, I got a PC when all the hipper kids were buying Amigas and Atari STs, so I have everyone so far beaten for spec pauperism (seriously? 486s? LUXURY!)

Feast your eyes...

amstradpc208621.jpg

An Amstrad with:

  • 8 MHz 8086 processor (I could have had a 80286 at 12 MHz if I'd settled for a CGA graphics card)
  • EGA graphics (640×350 resolution, 64 colours)
  • 640 KB RAM
  • 3.5" floppy disk
  • 30 MB "hard card" hard disk (the motherboard had no IDE controllers, so this was a hard drive and a controller integrated onto a single 8 MHz 8-bit ISA bus. Not so many years layer, I would deem ISA to be unfit to house even my sound card, let alone my system's hard drive!)
  • MS-DOS v3.3 (and Windows 2.1, but I quickly uninstalled that)
  • No sound card, just PC speaker burps and bloops
  • 14" monitor

It probably sucked balls, in hindsight, but I was ecstatic at the time. I got it for Christmas and discovered my father had made it print "MERRY CHRISTMAS LOVE FROM MUM AND DAD" every time it booted. I demanded this lameness be removed immediately, and he passed me a DOS manual and told me to do it myself... I had figured out config.sys and autoexec.bat before lunch.

My Amiga owning friends thought it was pitiful and hilarious. For some reason, I stuck with PCs, and they stuck with mocking me, until the fateful day I installed Doom on my 486... the rest was history.

wow...me and my brother had one of those as well! it wasn't that bad, played quite a few decent dos games including Monkey Island 1.

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