Jump to content

Only God Forgives - Refn and Gosling's Next Film


lordcookie
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am a bit squeamish/bit of a wuss... I loved Drive and really want to see this though.

Is the violence obvious when it's coming? In Drive it was, which meant i could hide behind my hand quickly enough when the nasty stuff got super nasty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a bit squeamish/bit of a wuss... I loved Drive and really want to see this though.

Is the violence obvious when it's coming? In Drive it was, which meant i could hide behind my hand quickly enough when the nasty stuff got super nasty.

Yes. it couldn't be made clearer when some ultra violence is abotu to be unleashed. There's really only one sequence that will have you wincing and it's quite prolonged, which - compared to the head-stomping in Drive - actually means it is less shocking, even if it is far more explicit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just had an email from my local Cinema and unlike Drive, they're actually showing Only God Forgives for the following week!

Can't wait to see this, it looks so dreamlike, beautiful and absolutely horrible at the same time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Saw this last night, thought it was close to a masterpiece. I'll never watch it again but it's amazing to see a film so entirely consistent, singular and confident in it's own vision. I get the feeling Refn compromised on nothing. Definitely got a big Enter The Void vibe too. Seriously cool film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Houellebecq, on 03 Aug 2013 - 07:30, said:

Saw this last night, thought it was close to a masterpiece. I'll never watch it again but it's amazing to see a film so entirely consistent, singular and confident in it's own vision. I get the feeling Refn compromised on nothing. Definitely got a big Enter The Void vibe too. Seriously cool film.

Got to agree. I thought it was brilliant.

Hope this isn't going to make me sound too much a pretentious knobhead, but I think that Refn has used his very obvious Asian movie influences to great effect here - it's a very Asian film I think. It takes the slow-mo night shots of a Wong Kar Wai film, the unflinching violence of any number of Beat Takeshi's yakuza flicks and the good cop/bad cop device of something like Infernal Affairs and melds them together in that steadily-becoming-a-trademark Refn style. The whole film drips with menace from the moment we're introduced to Billy right to the karaoke at the end and it never lets up. I don't understand how some people could call it boring; the nightmarish atmosphere of it all kept me riveted.

The film also reflects a fascinating sense of the word 'justice'; the movie is populated with some horrible people who you want to believe are getting what they deserve, and yet you can't help but feel that Vithaya Pansingarm's Javier-like police chief, with a rule-book in his head that he sticks unerringly to, somehow takes this justice a bit too far.

Thought the fist fight was expertly shot and appropriately visceral, although its impact was marred somewhat by my wife leaning over and whispering 'K.O.!' in a Street Fighter voice when Julian got his lights punched out.

I didn't even find the violence that disturbing to be honest, and that coming from someone who prefers his fluffy Animal Crossing to God of War.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Must admit, I found this really disappointing & was frustrated by how abstract it was.

Their was no emotional connection between characters, you were placed down in a new location with no smooth progression & it felt like their was no meaning behind the entire film.

Remember that feeling of leaving the cinema after the sharp ending of No Country for Old Men? Stretch that out for 90 minutes & that's Only God Forgives.

A beautiful, dreamlike film but I was gutted by how much I did not like it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed about the violence. I was expecting for there to be several wince-worthy moments, but no. It's probably the way the violence unfolds really, it isn't at all explosive like Drive for instance. In most of the scenes where there is violence, you see it coming.

The film also reflects a fascinating sense of the word 'justice'; the movie is populated with some horrible people who you want to believe are getting what they deserve, and yet you can't help but feel that Vithaya Pansingarm's Javier-like police chief, with a rule-book in his head that he sticks unerringly to, somehow takes this justice a bit too far.


Did you mean Javert? I'm not feeling that comparison at all; Javert is a loyal servant to the state, to the point of numbing his own sense of morality. He is a bureaucrat, basically. Bureaucrats don't slice people up.



Yeah I thought this was pretty disappointing. Had some beautiful moments and a decent soundtrack, but unfortunately the characters were thinly developed, and there was a lack of any narrative interest. I enjoyed Valhalla Rising and adored Drive, so this came as a bit of a shock. I felt that Gosling's character was too passive; as has been much publicised, he barely speaks but he barely does anything else either. This would be fine if he were just a fixed point around which more interesting things happen, but they don't. It's just a bit empty and pointless and meh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if it was down to me watching Wild At Heart the night before, but I got a real Lynch vibe from this. I take it we aren't meant to

see Chang's sword as actually being there, but more of a symbol of justice being carried out? It seemed to magically appear from behind his back and the unrealistic sounds it gave off, especially that bit when he was blowing on it, made me think Julian handed himself in to serve time for his part in events (and for the murder of his father) rather than the brutal final scene? I am pretty good at missing the point with these sorts of abstract films though...

The mother was wicked in this, loved the dinner scene and when she

hugged Julian and felt up his bum. Julian was one seriously messed up guy, but heroically kept his morals throughout. Might not have made for the most typically exciting movie, but that arse kicking he took was one brave move by the director.

I really enjoyed it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Code of Conduct intact - it was during the ads.

Right, the film. Have to say, I absolutely loved it.

Huge Lynchian quality to the dialogue scenes, lots of slow, ponderous stares and monosyllabic conversations. I just love being in those kinds of worlds, and this does it pretty well. If you're a David Lynch fan, there's plenty to love here without ever tipping into the ultra surreal garbled narrative of something like Inland Empire.

The lighting, soundtrack and cinematography are just impeccable. Every single frame could be hung on your wall. The soundtrack leers from Shining-esque cacophany to tub-thumbing pulsing electro beats. They got it so right in the audio department, and it sounded so fucking great in the cinema. Every punch, sword slice and footstep as a real echo and feeling to it.

Jaded by my experiences with Salo/Serbian Film/Irreversible, the violence didn't bother me at all. I could see how some might find it wince inducing at times but if you're seasoned with this type of stuff then you'll be fine. It's no reason not to go and see the movie. It's not even that graphic to be honest, can't see what all the fuss was about it.

Gosling pulls in a peculiar and occasionally powerful performance despite his barebones script, but the real star here is Kristin Scott Thomas. She is such a fucking psycho.

Occasionally empty, never less than totally visually and aurally arresting, surreal, vaguely pretentious cinema, but such a great experience. I've never seen anything quite like it.

4 out of 5.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just caught this. I really enjoyed it. Visceral and uncompromising.

I feel a lot of the biting reviews are being pretty unfair about characters and script

as we can clearly see Julian has some very deep and dark issues he's fighting with, regarding the whole Oedipus complex/death of his father - His mother even says 'He killed his father with his bare hands' which goes to explain the near fascination with all the hand shots (clenched fists, bloody hands in the sink etc.) He's a man of very few words and can't hold any sort of normal relationship, as much as he might want to. We don't need a load of dialogue to explain why he is that way. Though I'm still trying to think which angle I like best regarding the hand insertion scene.

Defo got some Lynch vibes from it too. And it's worth repeating - the soundtrack is perfect.

Will be catching this again when it hits my local indie next month.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

This is on US Netflix now.

Just watched it, and I'm somewhere in the middle. Didn't hate it, but didn't love it. I thought the pace would be the biggest sticking point for me. But I don't think it dragged, particularly, even if there is a lot of shots of just people staring, or walking very slowly. Mainly because everything looks so beautiful. But at the end of it of all, I was left with a feeling of emptiness, of pointlessness. Maybe that's the point of the movie? I dunno.

Not as good as Drive out of five.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I loved Drive. Really, really loved it. In fact it's easily one of my favourite films of the past ten years.

This one not so much. It was like a photography exhibition with a thinly veiled plot attached. Had its moments and reminded me of David Lynch in abstract mode with the more interesting stuff removed.

I didn't think it was bad at all, or boring. It just seemed like something Refn had to get out of his system. I'd probably have rated it more had I seen it at the cinema.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.