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Question - How did the Amiga shape up against the SNES/MD?


SqueakyG
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16 minutes ago, Protocol Penguin said:

Three games that come to mind which used a two button joystick are Turrican, Turrican 2, Star Ray. I'm sure there were a few more (although sadly there weren't many that did).

I think that Flashback, the two Mortal Kombat games & Super Street Fighter all had an option for two buttons too. 

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I've wondered (because I'm not a coder), could an Amiga 500 standard half meg computer do an accurate recreation of Ridge Racer? Now, I know the answer is "of course not you prick" but hear me out. 

 

I know you couldn't do the texture mapping, the CD audio, etc. But could it do the handling, the physics? 

 

Like, if the coders of the era were talented enough could an Amiga have done Ridge Racer's gameplay, physics and handling if the game ran in wireframe for example.  How much computing power is needed to do the handling we take for granted in games today?

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12 minutes ago, dumpster said:

I've wondered (because I'm not a coder), could an Amiga 500 standard half meg computer do an accurate recreation of Ridge Racer? Now, I know the answer is "of course not you prick" but hear me out. 

 

I know you couldn't do the texture mapping, the CD audio, etc. But could it do the handling, the physics? 

 

Like, if the coders of the era were talented enough could an Amiga have done Ridge Racer's gameplay, physics and handling if the game ran in wireframe for example.  How much computing power is needed to do the handling we take for granted in games today?

 

How many frames per second would you want it to run?

Also I think you're better off considering the 1 meg version - not that it would likely make much of a difference.

The physics in Grand Prix, Indy 500 and Stunt Car Racer were good (at the time, from memory).

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a computer cpu/gpu/custom chips are a bunch of silicon and you are comparing a silicon bundle from 1987 with a different bundle in 1995. In terms of coding you can code whatever you like in the performance window you have - you can code incredibly complex calculations into a 68000 chip it will just ages to do. Physics and handling is floating point maths at a base level and almost any cpu can do that inc the 68000. But what framerate will you get? who knows.

 

The framerate of even basic wireframe would be very low with "ridge racer" physics and handling coded into it so unplayable and a fairly pointless comparison. In terms of physics the AMiga did stuff like Stunt Car Racer and Frontier Elite 2 as well as Formula 1 gp. The latter you can see the difference in performance capability as PS1 and Amiga had a good F1 game.

 

But your question misses a fairly obvious problem, the gulf of 10 years of tech between the Amiga and the first mainstream home platform to do Ridge Racer.

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I think it's easy to forget how much the Amiga could actually do when pushed. Indy 500s giant 30 car Wreckfest style pile ups. F1s ultra simulationist approach with customised car setups and a full F1 grid racing in real time and instant replays of any car on the track.

 

I don't think the physics and handling model in Stunt Car Racer is any less sophisticated than Ridge Racer to be honest and that was something that could be squeezed down on to the Spectrum.

 

A one to one recreation of Ridge Racer itself I think is just too much, no matter how much you pared it down. But a mid 90s arcade racer style handling model with those "designed" collision and drifting physics, as opposed to the more simulation heavy approach that was fashionable on the Amiga?

 

Sure, if it was made with the hardware in mind. You'd still be getting Amiga quality visuals and frame rates though. Even with wire frames I don't think you'd get more than around 20fps.

 

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