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Eggs


strawdonkey
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I've started doing a bit of cooking recently, largely Japanese food. At some point I'd like to make an Omurice - basically rice with an omelette on top, but currently struggle a bit with getting a smooth texture on the cooked egg.

Whenever I try to get the egg smooth, I find that it's full of gelatinous bits that don't break up, which lead to lumps. This is fine for making scrambled egg or something like that, but omelettes tend to be a bit lumpy and shitty-looking as a result.

Am I just not whisking it enough or should I be trying to force it through a strainer first?

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What the hell? Lumps? Are you expecting something as smooth and rounded as a pancake? That's not how quite how an omelette should look anyway, but they usually go round and flat-ish just because you're cooking it in a round pan with a flat surface regardless. I wouldn't over beat the eggs, hell when I do mine I just break the eggs direct into the pan and given them a quick breakup & mix with a spatula anyway.

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I'd assumed he meant the bits when, in scrambled eggs for example, you end up with areas where the yolk or the white remain as contiguous areas, rather than having blended together. All I can really suggest for that is giving it a decent forking though.

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Thanks all - just wanted to check I wasn't missing a trick, other than "whisk them more". :)

Just a wee side question and I'm not much of a cook outside of making things me and my kid can eat for lunch so probably amateur hour stuff but are you adding something like butter or milk? If so, I always find it better to whisk the egg yolks themselves first and then add whatever. It seemed to cut out a similar problem for me. I usually whisk them with a spare chopstick, break the yokes up as mission number one and just go to town for about a minute. So...aye, whisk more!

Japanese people don't usually add butter or milk or hardly anything when they make them I've found and usually just make them more like how they do tamagoyaki. Yet they tend to slather it all in ketchup so it doesnt taste of anything else!

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Obviously fresh eggs make a huge difference. After that I find i'm trying to make a baveuse omelette (which is the norm for omurice) it's better to use chopsticks, fork or a flatter whisk so that I can break up the yolks first and so that I get as little air into the eggs as possible.

While cooking the key is hot pan, good film of fat (the Japanese do use butter for omelettes, if you don't see fat go in it's usually because it's a well seasoned pan) and then as soon as the eggs hit you want to agitate them as much as possible (see first video) but not with a whisk. Fork, chopsticks, rubber tipped whisk (something like this http://www.johnlewis.com/normann-copenhagen-whisk/p561880?colour=Black) work well.

I find the old school way of rice inside (e.g. what you see on Lunch Queen) isn't as good as the newer way of omelette on top of rice split open (see second video)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tell you what I love doing at the most, fruit bacon in the pan with a heavy lid n top of the rashers to keep it flat. I usually prefer grilling bacon.

Once bacon is cooked, add 3 eggs to the pan in and around the bacon. The eggs fry in all the bacon goodness and it really tastes amazing.

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Tell you what I love doing at the most, fruit bacon in the pan with a heavy lid n top of the rashers to keep it flat. I usually prefer grilling bacon.

Once bacon is cooked, add 3 eggs to the pan in and around the bacon. The eggs fry in all the bacon goodness and it really tastes amazing.

Well done. You have invented bacon & eggs.

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