Jump to content
IGNORED

Cricket Thread


Don Rosco
 Share

Recommended Posts

Two great semis as spectacles, but as ways to find the best team? I’m not so sure. Chasing bias has been massive this tournament and the two standout teams are both out before the final. Hope NZ stuff the Aussies but mostly hope that the conditions and few don’t play too much of a role.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/11/2021 at 17:33, Gabe said:

So did England make a mess of that or was it all about New Zealand? 

 

Edit: I saw from the BBC feed things were looking good until Jordan was hit for 23.

 

Reading the BBC website commentary the experts were all saying “New Zealand are a batsman or two short”.

 

In the end I tend to think it was the change of bowling lineup with Mills’ injury that did the most damage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

It’s now less than a year until the final of the 2022 T20 World Cup. Let’s take a look at how some of the teams are shaping up with just a handful of matches left for fine-tuning.

The world is unanimously agreed that the 2022 edition will be the first ‘proper’ T20 World Cup since the pandemic. A dozen teams have already qualified through the main qualification event, which was held in the UAE and Oman in October and November 2021. Four more teams will join them from the ‘global qualifiers’ next year.

 

I enjoyed this article https://www.kingcricket.co.uk/with-less-than-a-year-to-go-lets-look-at-whos-finding-form-for-the-t20-world-cup/2021/11/15/ and I fully approve of the memory-holing efforts that it is a part of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Azeem Rafiq's testimony to the DCMS panel was powerful stuff and the way he has fought to be heard is both utterly shameful (that he needed to) but inspirational in how he has conducted himself.

 

Hopefully, as he says, his voice can be used to help others because it is clear serious changes need to be made. Whether the ECB is strong enough we shall see, but this needs addressing all the way down the chain to the amateur game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve not seen his testimony, only followed the headlines, so I could be way off.
 

It strikes me though, that the problem isn’t racism in cricket - it’s racism in our society at large. So there clearly is racism in cricket, but some of the comments in the media and the focus seems at risk of saying that’s the only problem here. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just read an overview of the testimony, and boy - it seems damning. I hope it tears everything up (wishful thinking, but it's all I've got).

 

I can't imagine how hard it would be to get this to light, so my hat is very much off to Azeem Rafiq for dragging it there, and those who've later backed him up.

 

I think this bothers me more than most sports, because the commentary (my interface between myself and it) seems very inclusive. I love the fact that TMS always has commentators from the side we're playing, and the attitude in general in cricket is generally about enjoying the game when it's played well rather than partisanship (as far as that's possible).

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You only have to see the way that Archer, Jordan, Ali, Rashid, Rawlins et al have been treated by certain sections of the press to see that whilst cricket might give the impression of being inclusive you don’t have to scratch the surface very deeply to find good old British snide racism underneath.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A lot of the stuff seems to have happened at the height of Farage/Brexit mania. Society was especially shitty back then, people were being overtly racist towards Mrs Naysonymous and the kids in the street (I’m white, they are brown). It was fucking disgusting, but it was definitely felt like a thing being whipped up by bad actors on social media and rolling news coverage.   It’s faded a bit now because people seem preoccupied by covid, but it will never go away.  The fact that Yorkshire allowed it to go as far as they did with Rafiq is shameful and I’m glad he’s taken it to the top.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thought this was a good article (the author having previously been the subject of a story after an interaction with ‘Aggers’): https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2021/nov/16/azeem-rafiqs-testimony-exposes-how-power-works-in-cricket-and-in-britain?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

 

There are articles on the Agnew incident, but I first heard about it on the Football Weekly podcast: https://www.theguardian.com/football/audio/2020/jun/16/the-life-and-times-of-jonathan-liew-and-premier-league-returns-football-weekly?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Sirloin said:

You only have to see the way that Archer, Jordan, Ali, Rashid, Rawlins et al have been treated by certain sections of the press to see that whilst cricket might give the impression of being inclusive you don’t have to scratch the surface very deeply to find good old British snide racism underneath.

 

Yeah, and this goes back decades. Monty Panesar was never trusted despite arguably being one of the best natural spin bowlers England have ever produced. Devon Malcolm was England's most devastating wicket-taker, but was frequently dropped. Chris Lewis' attitude was constantly questioned for no good reason. Phil DeFreitas was considered lazy, while Dean Headley was ridiculed for his willingness to keep bowling in difficult conditions.  

 

The habitual attitude to black cricketers reminds me of the attitude towards black footballers in the 80s, when people would argue that while the black players were gifted athletes, they didn't understand the game and needed some white players to tell them what to do.  This is from memory, but I'm sure I saw someone on mainstream TV saying that a particular Crystal Palace squad would not be successful because they had too many black players, so while they would be able to run around a lot, they'd lack football brains.  That's not a million miles away from what people used to say about Panesar and Malcolm, and now say about Archer, despite him already having shown himself on many occasions to be an intelligent cricketer capable of adjusting his game depending on the situation. You don't bowl out that super over in the WC final, having been called for a harsh wide and hit for a six early on, without being a very smart bowler.

 

Cricket is old-fashioned and anachronistic, and in my experience often attracts people who long for a mythical past when everything was simpler, the same idiots who voted for Brexit and have been fooled into believing that the passage of time is somehow the fault of immigrants.  I played a lot of club cricket, and you would come across some strange attitudes from time to time.  As a fairly oblivious white man I don't remember seeing anything especially malicious (although it's not impossible that I just managed to miss the worst stuff) but I do remember times when stereotyping would raise it's head. Like, we'd turn up to a match and the opposition had an afro-carribean black player, so some of our team would start worrying about how fast he bowled.  One time we were short, so we drafted in an Indian lad from someone's work. It was assumed that he could bowl spin and he was talked into doing so.  It turned out he'd never bowled spin before. It was unclear whether he was trying to bowl off-spin or leg-spin as he was improvising a technique on the fly, so was labelled a "mystery spinner" by my teammates.

 

Cricket needs to examine it's attitudes from top to bottom. I hope this will be a watershed moment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, feltmonkey said:

One time we were short, so we drafted in an Indian lad from someone's work. It was assumed that he could bowl spin and he was talked into doing so.  It turned out he'd never bowled spin before. It was unclear whether he was trying to bowl off-spin or leg-spin as he was improvising a technique on the fly, so was labelled a "mystery spinner" by my teammates.

 

both depressingly sad and kind of hilarious!

 

I took my kid to All-stars cricket (the ECB-backed youngest kids programme) this summer, which is basically my first contact with any cricket beyond watching the top levels. Locally we seem to be at least 50:50 'asian' players and 'white' even in the adult groups so that in itself hopefully bodes well. Plenty of minorities almost entirely missing, mind you, but maybe it's just a reflection of the super-local mix. The kids were pretty much an even split of girls and boys too for the next few age groups.

 

How this filters through to the people who run clubs, associations, counties and the national game plus the media, I really don't know - it feels like it would take far too long to happen naturally.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, MarkN said:

I think this bothers me more than most sports, because the commentary (my interface between myself and it) seems very inclusive. I love the fact that TMS always has commentators from the side we're playing, and the attitude in general in cricket is generally about enjoying the game when it's played well rather than partisanship (as far as that's possible).

 

This has hit a note with me too. Part of my reason for enjoying Sky's coverage is that it has always been pretty inclusive, having a range of pundits from all over the world and just seemed to be a nice group of people (and I posted at the time but I will miss Mikey terribly.)

 

And perhaps that is still the case, but the fact the game is so rotten underneath I guess surprises me, even though I think society is pretty rotten so why should cricket be any different?

 

First and foremost I hope proper, progressive actions happen as a result of this, and Rafiq finds some kind of peace (because it sounds like he has been through hell) and where other instances come out (such as at Essex) then these incidents are heard and investigated. 

 

And I'd also like get better too. Having read the article @Stopharageposted, I realise that I have been a bit harder on Archer in the past than other players and whilst I consciously think it's because he is such a talent and want to see more from him (I do think he's brilliant and is a big loss to the team), perhaps I have fallen foul of the type of unconscious bias that article suggests, and I am both shocked and disappointed and actually ashamed with myself at that realisation.

 

So yeah, some learning for me to do too I think. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.