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CVG to Close | Edge Online Goes Aswell


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MaffewE, I thought you were trying to give constructive criticism. Do you work for Future?

Thought you were also bowing out of the thread.

What K said, pretty much!

In the past, I've been guilty of 'piling on' in Prankster threads. Pointing at 'psycho' looking tweets and laughing, generally being a bit of an arse. It wasn't really constructive or fair in any way.

As part of general improvements I've been trying to make within myself, and because I think that genuine enthusiasm for a subject or potential profession can go a long way, I decided this time I'd try and actually help properly rather than being an arse. After all, as I've stated, in my actual profession I offer similar advice quite regularly (no I don't work for Future).

While I'm happy that he has thanked me for constructive criticism, the rest of the post is the same as before - deflecting it off in every direction. Positive comments are 'woo, I'm great!', negative comments are 'what the fuck do they know, that last guy told me I was great!'.

I've been genuinely trying to help, and I've replied for as long as I've thought there was still a chance of that happening.

Eight years ago, people advised him he wrote like he was completing a university thesis, that he overused quotes that were often taken out of context, that he regularly used words incorrectly, that he didn't research things he then stated as fact, and that he had an inflated sense of his own importance. Eight years later, the only thing that has apparently changed is that Rllmuk posters are now all bastards, and Eurogamer and NeoGAF are his friends. And in eight years time, after Simon Parkin gets the restraining order and NeoGAF have banned him for the fourth time, it'll be another set of 'worthy' sites getting the regular promotional posts, replying with the same advice, and being told that they're the wankers.

So basically, it was an attempt at being generally helpful to atone for previous 'sins', and to see if it would actually work. And yep, it failed. Let's all move on.

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I expect there's someone somewhere writing articles about their mildly obsessive dislike of Military Modelling magazine.

60098.jpg

Oh man, I used to work in the same office as the Military Modelling guys. They were an enlightened bunch and no mistake.

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  • 2 months later...

Farewell SFX.co.uk and Totalfilm.com:

http://www.mcvuk.com/news/read/future-s-total-film-sfx-online-and-gamesradar-to-combine-into-one-site/0139106

Publishing outlet Future has announced its plans to combine TotalFilm.com, SFX.co.uk and GamesRadar.com into a single website.

The unified networks will re-launch as a single entity in November, with a new-look website delivering film, TV and game exclusives, reviews and offers.

Under the new structure, a new channel on GamesRadar.com will host all of Futures film and sci-fi content.

[...]

Future confirmed that there will be no changes to the print or digital editions of Total Film or SFX as part of the unification.

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  • 2 months later...

With C&VG finally going, here's an article with Jaz Rignall, Paul Davies, Ed Lomas, Steve Key, Patrick Garratt and Tim Ingham talking about their memories of the magazine:

http://www.computerandvideogames.com/483033/features/messages-from-the-editors/

Ed Lomas on Freeplay:

We had a couple of pages in the 'Freeplay' section to fill in the middle of the night and designer Tom Cox was bored of waiting for us to finish writing copy, so he went upstairs to Nintendo Magazine, stole a bunch of readers' drawings and made a two-page section he called 'Drawinz wot you dun', and invented a dog called Hunter who did turds on the worst pictures. It ended up being one of the most popular parts of the magazine.

Patrick Garratt on game-online.com. (They also had dreamcast.co.uk too. :wub:)

CVG gave me my second job. I started in 1999 as employee number three on game-online.com, after recommending in my interview that the site be closed because the URL was so awful. Rebranding it computerandvideogames.com and aligning it with CVG magazine was my idea, at least in part.

Steve Fulljames and a Scottish guy called Gus made up the rest of the team. On my first day, Paul Davies sent back assets from the PS2 reveal in Japan, and I clearly remember Alex Simmons (now the boss at IGN UK) squealing like at infant at the first next-gen PES screens. That office held a great passion for games.

We sat in the corner in the EMAP offices in Angel and I wrote news. We were an experiment. EMAP's bosses were committed to the internet, but no one knew how to make it work financially and the print guys were terrified. They wouldn't let us publish any of their content on the site. They wouldn't even put our URL on the cover of the magazine at first. We were regarded as much as an enemy as an opportunity.

We faced opposition for good reason: we cost (we didn't even carry ads in those days). But while it was true we drained the business, we had a fierce reputation for winning. Who knew? We did. Who was on the phone? We were. PR feared us, and I say that with no hint of exaggeration: we literally scared people.

We were the frontline of games news in a world where games news barely existed. Our day was a battle for exclusives, something shocking and entirely new to those entrenched in 30-day deadlines.

I think Stephen Fulljames went on - with Ed Lomas - to work at the Official DC Magazine?

We had a thread about C&VG memories in the Retro folder a couple of years ago:

http://www.rllmukforum.com/index.php?/topic/264460-computer-and-video-games/

There, I posted lots of scans from a 1994 C&VG tie-in book, and this video which I somehow found:

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It got screwed up later when the magazine was doing well and management started to pay attention, and tried to make it more professional and have broader appeal. They brought in people who didn't know games to run it

Ah that's what it was.

I know Jaz is a legend and all but the CVG I loved was the Paul Davies/Ed Lomas era, with the 5 star ratings. I stopped dreading CVG in print almost exactly at the time Ed's describing here.

Maybe it's good it goes now with a sembelance of respectability. Future's a dead company walking at this point, there's a reason they don't print circulation figures anymore but even the mighty PC Format is now staple bound, usually the sure death sign for any magazine in the 90s.

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PCF has suffered an identity crisis since it lost the cover girls 5 or so years ago and is in desperate need of a redesign. PC mags may be suffering from the net competition, but I still believe there's a place for an enthusiasts' PC mag. Dennis did a great job with relaunching PC Pro a few months ago, convincing me to buy it for the 1st time in 5+ years. Although it's unlikely, I'm still hoping they make a last ditch attempt to rejuvenate the mag in the next few months, perhaps by adopting various elements from Linux Format & Mac Format.

Back on topic, I stumbled across the final issue of EMAP's CVG when browsing a few magazines last night. It's truly awful, but I still felt nostalgic while reading it. It's a pity Future abandoned their CVG Specials series a few years ago.

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When CVG started the percentages (was that with the redesign), it went crap. Sadly I'd only been buying the magazine for around a year prior to that, starting with that Lara croft cover with her in a bra. I was probably 11 at the time, so it was a great cover. I liked its cheap feel, recycled paper and the width of it and it was like £2 versus £3.50 for most mags. It was also big in pages.

That re-design slimmed it down in both pages and width, took the interesting stuff away and to make it even worse they bumped the price up massively. I remember re-designs were always an excuse to bump the price of a magazine up as it happened with NOM at the time too.

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Julian 'Jaz' Rignall was, unsurprisingly, one of the few journos who fully understood The Wonderful 101. I'd love to have a pint with him and talk about all the greatness that we've had since the Mean Machines days. Those guys were my go-to resource for learning about 'the good shit' when I was first entering console gaming as a nine year old.

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PCF has suffered an identity crisis since it lost the cover girls 5 or so years ago and is in desperate need of a redesign. PC mags may be suffering from the net competition, but I still believe there's a place for an enthusiasts' PC mag. Dennis did a great job with relaunching PC Pro a few months ago, convincing me to buy it for the 1st time in 5+ years. Although it's unlikely, I'm still hoping they make a last ditch attempt to rejuvenate the mag in the next few months, perhaps by adopting various elements from Linux Format & Mac Format.

I'm a PC Pro subscriber, as much for the podcast as anything but yes an enthusiast mag's got to have room, I don't know if that would look more like Pro than Format though, they've clearly have different focuses.

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  • 1 month later...

Going in a couple of weeks, and not to a better place :(

In late February, Edge is moving to GamesRadar+. We’ll be joining CVG, Official PlayStation Magazine, Official Xbox Magazine and GameMaster to create the most comprehensive gaming website in the world.
Articles from the Edge archive will be available alongside new interviews, opinion and features and the best content from the website will be migrated over to our new GR+ homepage. Our print and digital editions will remain unchanged, as will our Facebook, Twitter and Google+ pages.
Alongside games news, reviews and features, you’ll also be able to find film, TV, comic and book coverage from Total Film and SFX. We’ll have more news regarding the launch date, and more detailed information on what you can expect, in the coming weeks.
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I've never given Gamesradar a second look. Surely Edge's rep would have made for the better brand from which to promote a big gaming network. The name still carries some weight in the gaming world, and would command far more attention than the entirely forgettable Gamesradar.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 5 months later...

It's played merry hell with every Wikipedia article that ever referenced a Future site. Some go to magazine main pages, some go to other articles about the same game, some to different magazines' articles, some to different games in the same franchise...

I guess they have some sort of link redirector that does a site search for words in the URL and returns the first result.

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