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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild


revlob
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14 minutes ago, Davros sock drawer said:

 

It does that "sunshine on a rainy day" effect so well, where the rocks are still wet but the sun is shining. In fact I'm not sure I've ever seen that in a game. 

 

GTAV has sunny rainstorms, I think Ninty and Rockstar are the only developers with a real understanding of light and weather. Everyone else not so much.

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5 minutes ago, jonamok said:

It never ceases to amaze me as I wander around, that every little rock and crevice, stream and tributary, tree and copse, hill and mountain, island and cliff, dale and valley, glacier and lava lake have all been placed here with a purpose. It's continental in scale, yet nothing feels cookie-cutter or automated. Every one of these billion things feels hand-crafted and hand-placed to enhance my fun.

 

And whether it is truly bespoke, or the product of the best landscaping algorithm ever written, it is an astounding achievement in world building.

 

 

I think hand-crafted does it a disservice. That implies you can tell someone made it, and if almost feels more than that. 

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So I put some good time in this weekend, completing my first dungeon and making my way north to the forest...



I found the dungeon shorter than I was expecting but I was quite pleased with that, I felt like the whole escapade was part of the same adventure - the shock arrows, gaining access to it, etc. I really enjoyed the resolution story-wise as well, and the feeling that everything you do and achieve has genuine repercussions.

So then I moved north toward the Korok Forest, in search of Hestu again.

I found the Lost Woods interesting - I got misted up a couple of times but figured out the dynamic pretty quickly from how they set out the torches in the start. Gentle signposting from Nintendo there. Also me face palming a couple of times when I tried to whistle my horse and this put my own torch away. Doh!

I'm not sure which beast to tackle next... just tidying up a few side quests and I do have a few for Akkala so I guess I will head that way next up... :)

 

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2 minutes ago, abc said:

 

As long as you don't do what I did and...

 

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...try to use your arrows on the incoming attacks from the elephant, instead of the way you're meant to do it. It works, but it eats through your arrow supply (and I thought the NPCs meant I had to use the shock arrows in that whole sequence, so I nearly used them up!). My only excuse is that it was early on in the game, and I hadn't yet learned the "dungeon pattern".

 

Oh damn, I used arrows as well. It's only now, when I've started questioning how else I could have done it I've realised the answer.

Spoiler

It's your ice block power, isn't it? You can shatter them with that. :doh:

Good job I had plenty of arrows!

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32 minutes ago, jonamok said:

It never ceases to amaze me as I wander around, that every little rock and crevice, stream and tributary, tree and copse, hill and mountain, island and cliff, dale and valley, glacier and lava lake have all been placed here with a purpose. It's continental in scale, yet nothing feels cookie-cutter or automated. Every one of these billion things feels hand-crafted and hand-placed to enhance my fun.

 

And whether it is truly bespoke, or the product of the best landscaping algorithm ever written, it is an astounding achievement in world building.

 

 

Yeah, there's that gif somewhere of the Horizon devs 'painting' trees and foliage around some blank hills. Meh.

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6 minutes ago, mdn2 said:

Oh damn, I used arrows as well. It's only now, when I've started questioning how else I could have done it I've realised the answer.

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It's your ice block power, isn't it? You can shatter them with that. :doh:

Good job I had plenty of arrows!

 

I used arrows as well and I didn't have plenty.  I ended up using fire arrows & shock arrows as I'd used up all my regular arrows.

Spoiler

I suppose you could also use that power on the boss fight as well right?  Again, I used arrows there.

 

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On 15/03/2017 at 16:28, JPickford said:

Such as?

 

Surely you've played some open world games before Mr Pickford, Morrowind, Oblivion, Sleeping Dogs, Fallout 3 even Assassin Creed 2 (It pains me to even mention ass creed), all have better pacing than BOTW sadly, they also feature better stories and more to do in the world. Far to many empty fields and mountains with not much on them. You could argue that Link to the Past had more variate in its world map with the design of the various areas and the structure.

 

It's a good game, but Nintendo clearly don't have good experience with the genre and are still getting to learn the ropes, I mean 900 korok seeds that's a joke as a side quest even if you do need only about 500 and the weapons break just too quickly. Summoning your horse is a pain if you want to fast travel there are a lot of issues that Nintendo shouldn't be given a pass on here. It's good but far from great.

 

Oh and if I was a time traveller I'd be in a different time period right now, playing Shining Force IV.

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49 minutes ago, jonamok said:

It never ceases to amaze me as I wander around, that every little rock and crevice, stream and tributary, tree and copse, hill and mountain, island and cliff, dale and valley, glacier and lava lake have all been placed here with a purpose. It's continental in scale, yet nothing feels cookie-cutter or automated. Every one of these billion things feels hand-crafted and hand-placed to enhance my fun.

 

And whether it is truly bespoke, or the product of the best landscaping algorithm ever written, it is an astounding achievement in world building.

 

 

Almost everywhere you go to check something out, you can see something interesting just a bit further for your next destination. Maybe it's just an ingredient, or the plume of a campfire or a clump of trees where you may find a secret. It's like this huge trail of breadcrumbs in every direction that keeps you moving forward and sidetracked all the time. I find myself thinking 'I'll check out this shrine, after that I return to {village} to get some shopping/cooking done and call it a day', but once you come out of the shrine and look around you see another shrine, or a tower or maybe a few dwellings or a monster camp and before you know it another two hours are gone and then you realise you have 3 or 7 spirit orbs so you go hunt for another shrine to make sure you get enough orbs dividable by 4 so you can collect some hearts/stamina and...

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16 minutes ago, Riven said:

 

Surely you've played some open world games before Mr Pickford, Morrowind, Oblivion, Sleeping Dogs, Fallout 3 even Assassin Creed 2 (It pains me to even mention ass creed), all have better pacing than BOTW sadly, they also feature better stories and more to do in the world. Far to many empty fields and mountains with not much on them. You could argue that Link to the Past had more variate in its world map with the design of the various areas and the structure.

 

It's a good game, but Nintendo clearly don't have good experience with the genre and are still getting to learn the ropes, I mean 900 korok seeds that's a joke as a side quest even if you do need only about 500 and the weapons break just too quickly. Summoning your horse is a pain if you want to fast travel there are a lot of issues that Nintendo shouldn't be given a pass on here. It's good but far from great.

 

Oh and if I was a time traveller I'd be in a different time period right now, playing Shining Force IV.

 

BotW takes everything that all those games did (plus more), and does them all well, in one package. One practically bug-free package.

Even the titans such as Oblivion, Skyrim, and FO3 launch in a very lackluster fashion (let's not even talk about Ubisoft on this matter), or else why would there be thousands upon thousands of community-made improvements? Why does Skyrim SE for the PS4 still ship with broken quests and tons of other crap wrong with it (the more informed can unofficially patch the XB1 version)? If I could somehow mod BotW I'd look at technical optimisations and maybe remove some effects to keep things locked at 30fps. I'm honestly stuck for anything else I'd want to add or change....

Oh! I know, I'd add amethyst and emerald to the ore library. That's about it.

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12 minutes ago, Riven said:

 

Surely you've played some open world games before Mr Pickford, Morrowind, Oblivion, Sleeping Dogs, Fallout 3 even Assassin Creed 2 (It pains me to even mention ass creed), all have better pacing than BOTW sadly, they also feature better stories and more to do in the world. Far to many empty fields and mountains with not much on them. You could argue that Link to the Past had more variate in its world map with the design of the various areas and the structure.

 

It's a good game, but Nintendo clearly don't have good experience with the genre and are still getting to learn the ropes, I mean 900 korok seeds that's a joke as a side quest even if you do need only about 500 and the weapons break just too quickly. Summoning your horse is a pain if you want to fast travel there are a lot of issues that Nintendo shouldn't be given a pass on here. It's good but far from great.

 

Oh and if I was a time traveller I'd be in a different time period right now, playing Shining Force IV.

 

This is a bunch of shit. 

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5 minutes ago, Broker said:

Oh my god, this game is empty but Fallout 3 and Oblivion are better examples? I've poured hundreds of hours into those games, there's so much more empty space in their worlds than in this.

 

So much so that I've spent MONTHS filling them in myself. Well, using other people's creations of course. I did enjoy myself, especially after I start playing with all the survival, weather, realism and immersion aspects bolted on (which all came with BotW right out of the gate), but I'd never speak high praise of any Bethesda game in retail form.

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25 minutes ago, Riven said:

Surely you've played some open world games before Mr Pickford, Morrowind, Oblivion, Sleeping Dogs, Fallout 3 even Assassin Creed 2 (It pains me to even mention ass creed), all have better pacing than BOTW sadly, they also feature better stories and more to do in the world. Far to many empty fields and mountains with not much on them.

 

I find this whole paragraph totally baffling, to imply there is nothing to do in the world is just bizarre.

 

Just because the map screen doesn't look like this:

IMG_7753.PNG.b9ec3460050e1291d66b60f1eb393de7.PNG

Doesnt mean the world is empty! 

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17 minutes ago, Kevvy Metal said:

This is a bunch of ####. 

 

Sadly there's not much point me continuing any serious discussion on this if the fan responsive are offensive like this and people are just going to neg you when you are raising your thoughts, without even discussing why.

 

Cheers to the others who did make good replies to me.

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3 minutes ago, Riven said:

 

Sadly there's not much point me continuing any serious discussion on this if the fan responsive are offensive like this and people are just going to neg you when you are raising your thoughts, without even discussing why.

There are certainly criticisms that could be made about the game (e.g frame rate) but although I respect your right to feel that the world is empty and that there is not enough variation, they do seem like frankly bizarre things to pick on. There is a debate to be had over whether 'empty space' in an open world game is a good or a bad thing (it is a good thing).

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It certainly opens up the debate over what makes an "Adventure" game.. for me BotW epitomises what one should be.

Every single play session feels like a new adventure, one with very few limitations and minimal handholding. 

The world is an absolute delight to explore and spend time in.. reflected by the frankly ludicrous amount of hours many have spent in it since launch. 

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Sadly there's not much point me continuing any serious discussion on this if the fan responsive are offensive like this and people are just going to neg you when you are raising your thoughts, without even discussing why.

 

Cheers to the others who did make good replies to me.

 

I haven't played any of the other open world games you mentioned because I usually find "open world" presents me with constant dilemmas of whether I'm doing the right thing, so I second guess myself, and stress myself out (sad isn't it). BOTW however never makes me question because I know from how the game taught me early on that I can literally try and do whatever I want, I can't somehow screw up or waste a long period of time. I also don't get bored running around the world.

 

Anyway - I would be very interested to hear what about those games makes them less empty than BOTW?

 

I played a lot of WoW which has a lot of empty space filled with random enemies, it was far less satisfying running around in Wow trying to collect materials for things. I guess the one thing is that there aren't too many people running around Hyrule, but this is well explained in the history shown to the player, and there's lots of life in the hubs.

 

I have also been playing a bit of Ghost Recon Wildlands and the tagging of supplies etc seemed like nothing more than added bloat to try and create the perception of value in time spent in an area.

 

Regarding the koroks I do agree with the previous poster - they wanted to put enough in there that anybody could find a decent amount in whatever timeframe they deemed reasonable, it makes sense that collecting 900 isn't the same as collecting 100 gold skulltulas.

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16 minutes ago, Riven said:

Cheers to the others who did make good replies to me.

 

Who, like Majora? Who you negged yourself?

 

Quote

I played a lot of WoW which has a lot of empty space filled with random enemies, it was far less satisfying running around in Wow trying to collect materials for things. I guess the one thing is that there aren't too many people running around Hyrule, but this is well explained in the history shown to the player, and there's lots of life in the hubs.


WoW was great, for the time. It really was. Although despite the world being mostly seamless you could easily feel that the different areas were designed as 'zones' rather than one truly seamless landscape. Heading towards Death Mountain, as an example, feels like a gradient of landscape which takes five to ten minutes to blend from being green grassy fields to burning red rock.

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WoW was great, for the time. It really was. Although despite the world being mostly seamless you could easily feel that the different areas were designed as 'zones' rather than one truly seamless landscape. Heading towards Death Mountain, as an example, feels like a gradient of landscape which takes five to ten minutes to blend from being green grassy fields to burning red rock.

 

Yes I definitely agree. With WoW it was like they were ticking the zone boxes in vanilla, even in later stages the landscapes are all incredibly distinct but I guess they wanted to do that for universal appeal. Hyrule feels genuinely like one world :-)

 

That said, the first time i went to Winterspring I did fall in love.

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