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Consoles Are Dead


Jebs Votes
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The development environment and delivery format of the PC platform is very appealing, but PC is not the right device.

But, yeah, whatever, close the thread. Obviously if there was a time to talk about this topic, (and many people here would dispute even that) it was too early. Thanks to people who responded to my arguments. Some people can be real assholes with the ad hominem attacks, though.

In their defence, you're spouting a lot of total bollocks here, and using a lot of words you don't really grasp the meaning of.

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But, yeah, whatever, close the thread. Obviously if there was a time to talk about this topic, (and many people here would dispute even that) it was too early.

This topic was being done 10 years ago m8

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I'm not sure if console gaming is dead.

I do think that it feels like it's going backwards, or maybe becoming more niche.

It's definitely the first generation where you feel it's not making an impact outside of 13-35 year old male demographic.

It feels a bit like the 16 bit generation, before Playstation made gaming "cool" to those who wouldn't normally play games.

The fact that statistically more women than men play games now, yet hardly any women play on home consoles, sums it up.

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What stopped the customer from getting screwed in the case of a DVD player? There's one standard, but many manufacturers.

You can't really compare the two. One of the key features of console gaming from a consumer point of view is an expectation of quality. Not as in "Edge 9/10" but as in "not buggy as fuck". To maintain that quality, there has to be an organisation setting the standards and enforcing them, meaning they can dictate what can and can't be release on the system, as well as setting price points and so on. Whereas anyone with a DVD burner can release DVDs, with the only restrictions being age ratings.

As a "pure" gaming device. Video games exist on other media, like smartphones.

But, as demonstrated by console sales figures, a lot of people want dedicated gaming devices. Restricting their choice of what that device is can never be a good thing.

Not multiple hardware versions; the standard would remain as-is. Games should not require a certain feature that deviate from the basic standard. The only difference would be storage or peripherals.

So a PC, then? And, if there are multiple hardware manufacturers, you're always going to run into the problem that, while Gran Turismo 23 runs fine on a £600 Bang & Olafsen The System, it is literally unplayable on the £50 Aiwa The System. Either that or every game will need to be made to run on the cheapest, crappiest The System.

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The development environment and delivery format of the PC platform is very appealing, but PC is not the right device.

But, yeah, whatever, close the thread. Obviously if there was a time to talk about this topic, (and many people here would dispute even that) it was too early. Thanks to people who responded to my arguments. Some people can be real assholes with the ad hominem attacks, though.

You haven't presented any arguments for discussion. You made a statement which you have completely and utterly failed to back up. Consoles aren't dead, the PC is in rude health, and there is more diversity across more platforms than ever before. You thought you were being edgy and controversial; you were in fact being thick as fuck.
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DVD players all play DVDs to roughly the same standard and you could buy one for 50 quid or 300 quid... the basic functionality wasn't that expensive to enable a machine to play DVDs so there was a profit margin for all price points

if all "The SYSTEM"s had to have the same specs then there are two problems

1) At the moment consoles are sold at a loss (last gen and before) or very very close to break even (current gen allegedly). If there is one spec for THE SYSTEM then either price will have to be higher or the spec lower to allow a profit margin for manufacturers. As these manufacturers don't get a cut from each game sale they have to make profit on the hardware. They can't do this if they have to sell at £350 and cost to produce is £350.

2) So several manufacturers produce the SYSTEM which is underpowered. Every single one has to play all the games to same standard and very likely same UI and controller button layouts etc, so the only differences will be cosmetic. With DVD you had different outputs , different sound capabilities but by definition the SYSTEM has to do everything the same otherwise all the dubious advantages you give devs by having a unified platform are lost as they have to account for different capability levels

I just don't see how the above would be a viable market for multiple manufacturers to compete in. It didnt work for 3DO at all.

And add onto the above it would stifle innovation... would Nintendo still produce innovations like WiiMote if they had to sell WiiSports on the SYSTEM but only as part of a bundle that contained a load of extra peripherals.

I cant think of many games that were hugely successful that required a packed in piece of hardware (Rockband and Guitar Hero are the only ones that spring to mind).

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I cant think of many games that were hugely successful that required a packed in piece of hardware (Rockband and Guitar Hero are the only ones that spring to mind).

Didn't Donkey Kong and Zelda on the N64 require the memory expansion pack thing? I think there were a couple of games on the Saturn that needed one as well.

Another problem with the one platform, many manufacturers idea:

Piracy. If anyone is able to manufacture The System, it wouldn't take long before one was released that allowed you to copy games to the hard drive, use copied disks or whatever. It there would need to be always-on DRM. And we all love that.

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Didn't Donkey Kong and Zelda on the N64 require the memory expansion pack thing? I think there were a couple of games on the Saturn that needed one as well.

Another problem with the one platform, many manufacturers idea:

Piracy. If anyone is able to manufacture The System, it wouldn't take long before one was released that allowed you to copy games to the hard drive, use copied disks or whatever. It there would need to be always-on DRM. And we all love that.

Yes, perfect dark as well, apparently:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nintendo_64_accessories#Expansion_Pak

The Saturn on the other hand...

http://www.shinforce.com/saturn/RAMCompatibility.htm

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Didn't Donkey Kong and Zelda on the N64 require the memory expansion pack thing? I think there were a couple of games on the Saturn that needed one as well.

Majora's Mask needed the expansion pack, ocarina didnt.... Ocarina sold far far more than Majora's Mask

I don't think anyone would point to N64 expansion as a super successful addon only two games needed it to be mandatory. (Ok its 3 if you count Perfect Dark as that was severely hamstrung without it).

And instruments were successful for limited period...

The point is if there is only 1 format you would not get as much innovation... the need to make profit on hardware due to lack of game license cuts is , if anything, going to make decisions "safer" and less risky

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Another problem with the one platform, many manufacturers idea:

Piracy. If anyone is able to manufacture The System, it wouldn't take long before one was released that allowed you to copy games to the hard drive, use copied disks or whatever. It there would need to be always-on DRM. And we all love that.

The basic idea could be the same as any other consumer standard, the interested parties (manufacturers and software providers) agree on the spec and then anybody who wants to make one pays a license fee to the governing body to use the spec and associated trademarks, the hardware DRM system is provided to the manufacturers, they don't get to know how it works, but all software for the system would require it to run, just like the current hardware DRM systems employed by all the current consoles. Piracy occurred on all previous generation console hardware due to somebody being clever enough to reverse engineer the hardware DRM or find a loophole to bypass it entirely, so bespoke hardware is hardly any better. It'll be interesting to see if the last few holes in both Sony and Microsoft's DRM systems have finally been patched, they are getting pretty close to perfecting it.

Some expensive DVD systems refuse to run user-burned recordable discs because the manufacturer purposefully gimped the laser to not output that wavelength, but that was their choice and not something mandated by the standards body.

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