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Has a game ever moved you in the way that a great book or movie does?


partious
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Bit of a retro choice now, but there's a scene in SOS: The Final Escape on the PS2 where you meet an old couple trapped in a building.

They ask you to leave them and as soon as you get out of the building it collapses behind you.

Apart from that, it's the obvious stuff others have mentioned. The oppressive atmosphere and the journey to the final battle in Shadow of the Colossus and The Walking Dead are the only others I can think of.

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In fact, I don't think any book or movie ever made me feel as I did in SotC: I wasn't an observer, or a 'dear reader', I was complicit. No, more than complicit, I was destroying these magnificent creatures, and no-one else was involved.

You just don't get that direct 'What have I done?' experience in any other medium.

I think where SotC got it right was in not pushing you into any narrative - except that, to play the game, you had to engage at some point. But other than that, there was no setting up of any moral dilemma, no commentary.

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It's interesting that RE4 is as close to the ideal game I could ever wish for yet at no point did I really give a stuff about the plot. It was genuinely tense and ever scared at times, with some terrifying sound, but I don't think I eve felt really emotionally connected with it.

I was --

"Did you send out the invitations? Because I distinctly said no more than fifty people!"

made me roar with laughter. That's the equal of any cheesy action one-liner from any action movie flick for my money.

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Has a book ever made you feel as exhilarated as (say) Daytona in the arcades, or Super Mario Galaxy in full flow?

REAMDE by Neal Stephenson. It takes 200 pages to go anywhere then spends 600 pages being eight Die Hards stuck back-to-back. Also, the marketplace escape scene from his Baroque Cycle.

I can't accept that anyone didn't see that coming.

Oh you've lost your memory? Oh you share visions of Revan with the woman who defeated him? Oh, he didn't die? You're awfully skilled in the force for some random amnesiac smuggler aren't you? Huh, you can speak the ancient dead language of the alien artefacts no-one other than Revan and Malak have interacted with in millennia?

That Revan sure did have a cool mask.

You had to actively avoid paying attention to not see it 20 minutes into the game. That being said, it's probably my favourite game of the generation.

I'm completely immune to plot twists. I never see them coming. It's like a superpower. A really shit one.

Except The Prestige, in which I predicted the ending after about 45 minutes. That's the one exception. I guess it's my Kryptonite.

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Collosus, Secret of Mana, FFVII, Red Dead, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon (!)

Red Dead for the 'Far Away' bit, pure goosebumps. The 'end' and then The End.

FFVII just had so much good stuff with the characters backstories. Nanaki's Dad *sniff*.

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Silent Hill : Shattered Memories. It's almost more of an interactive story than a game I guess but that didn't less the impact of it all, the way you find yourself at the centre of a puzzle which ends up having a heartbreaking wee solution.

And I was one of the people who totally bought into and loved the plot of Bioshock : Infinite- there's a part on a snow-swept bridge in a storm where part of me knew that the game was deliberately making sure I couldn't reach a certain place on time, but a bigger part of me almost broke the controller trying to force my guy to move faster. The whole world, the mystery, the game around it- it really worked for me- could have done without the flabby central section but when

you meet the bitter, angry future version of Elizabeth and realised how much her father has fucked her up... goosebumps and the rest of it.


Last of Us.

The nursery. Normally I'm quite hardened but the pile of kids bodies under the rugs... and the graffiti-"They Didn't Suffer"... that really did make me stop and look at the scene and play through in my head the events leading up to the decision that poor guy must have had to make...

And by the end I had totally bought into the relationship between the two characters, much more than in a lot of films.


And GTA IV, in a way I didn't quite expect-

Towards the end where Niko finally drives on his way to find the guy who betrayed his fellow soldiers. All the way there, in the night time rain and thunder, I knew I was going to slot the guy. But by the time Niko arrived, the storm had passed, and the guy seemed so pathetic I couldn't do it.

Niko walks off to the car, sun rising, a new day, a fresh start, ambient music on the radio... would have been the perfect end to a game. (Unfortunately there were still a few missions left after it which sort of ruined the spell it had over me... but for a brief moment all the character development and so on actually added up to one perfect bit where I believed in the characters and situations enough to have some sort of emotional reaction to a choice.)


Jason Rohrer's Gravitation as well.

But not that game when you walk an old lady through a graveyard and sit her down for a bit.

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I found Gone Home really moving and I don't think it would have been the same in a traditional storytelling medium

Over the course of the game I got really emotionally attached to Samantha & Lonnie (and to a lesser extent the parents with their ridiculous sci-fi books and slightly rocky marriage) and was rooting for them towards the last act. I had a really profound sense of dread when I was heading towards the attic because while I didn't want the story to end with a suicide I really didn't want to be the one to physically discover it. The sense of relief when it turned out they'd found a happy ending was immense, and I don't think it would have been quite the same type of relief if it had been a really engaging book or a film

Journey was a fucking rollercoaster of emotion as well

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No, no game has moved me as much as a great novel or movie, and I've enjoyed many.

A couple have come close when I was younger (FFVII), and more naive to what the world had to offer, but nothing since.

The only "game" to come close is World of Warcraft, purely because the living, human players within it can - if you get close to them - spin you out beyond any novel or movie.

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Thinking about this a bit more games regularly move me (not just in the sad way as most of this thread implies ) more than books or movies simply because of the time involved,

Take my Borderlands post earlier, that was built up over of 18!months of living in that world for hundreds of hours, that's a lot of time being fully immersed and it interacting with its inhabitants, good time bad times, elation, devestation etc,

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I absolutely adored Shenmue.. and this thread has reminded me that I never finished the second one! Do Dreamcast emulators work?

There's a lot of talk about android based emulators in this thread. Dedicated units with controls built in. Emulate the Dreamcast apparently. Quite tempted myself.

http://www.rllmukforum.com/index.php?/topic/279058-modern-retro-handheld-game-players/

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The one which really sticks out for me is Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII. I think there was a combination of factors, but it had been years since FFVII came out and I knew it's characters and world so well. I loved the characters and I really cared about hearing their story. The game played well and I liked the new characters, but I wasn't really prepared for the ending.


When it came, even knowing what was going to happen (this being a prequel to FFVII), it crushed me. I remember watching the final cutscene, in genuine floods of tears because I was so distraught by the story. The fate of the characters, and the way they faced it, reminded me of the greatest pieces of art I've ever enjoyed.

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Thinking about it "has a game moved me in a way that a great book or movie could?" Well in my eyes all the great games that are dear to me move me in ways that book's or movies never can. Thats why I fucking love videogames, im just waiting for the world to catch up.

From your posting style, I'm honestly doubtful you've ever read anything that could be described as a 'great book'.

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There is an epic quest chain in the Wrath of the Lich King expansion of World of Warcraft where you find a paladin dying of the plague of undeath, which will eventually turn him into a mindless zombie. He tells you he has hidden into the mountains so that he wont harm anyone, and you then discover he was a great hero, responsible for saving hundreds of people before he got infected. You then go on this long series of quests trying to find some way to cure him, but you cant and eventually he succumbs to his wounds. It was quite a sad quest, really, but what makes it particularly moving is that this paladin was put into the game in honour of the brother of a blizzard employee who had died after a long battle with cancer, and this was his brothers way of honouring his memory.

I remember that one, too. Amazing stuff. I have a soft-spot for Wrath.

I really miss WoW whenever I think back to it.

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The one which really sticks out for me is Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII. I think there was a combination of factors, but it had been years since FFVII came out and I knew it's characters and world so well. I loved the characters and I really cared about hearing their story. The game played well and I liked the new characters, but I wasn't really prepared for the ending.

When it came, even knowing what was going to happen (this being a prequel to FFVII), it crushed me. I remember watching the final cutscene, in genuine floods of tears because I was so distraught by the story. The fate of the characters, and the way they faced it, reminded me of the greatest pieces of art I've ever enjoyed.

I liked Crisis Core as well. Watching Zack develop from a cocky bell-end into a matured and very likeable character, when you knew what was going to happen at the end anyway, was very well delivered. I liked it how the slots from the game system would roll throughout the last battle.

Great soundtrack as well.

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I can certainly say Silent Hill 2 has moved my bowels more than any book or film.

Otherwise, outside a few examples I can't think of anything that stands out. Sure, I tear up a bit at the end of Ico, but then I tear up a bit at the end of Terminator 2 so I'm not going to offer up my emotional fragility as a standard to test the power of media.

What I will echo is that games do things other media can't, and when done well, can stir up certain emotions with far more regularity than any other. Relief. Frustration. Joy. Panic. Feelings that take careful hands in passive media can be conjured up with a handful of rules and the benefit of direct control.

And from there, you can start to tug at the others. Scouser may or may not have been joking earlier when he suggested Cannon Fodder's Jops, but he's a terrific example of how a game's strength - the ability to affect the outcome - can have a powerful effect. Whether his eventual death affects you or not depends a great deal on how much you care, but make no mistake that if you do care, his loss hits all the harder.

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One thing about horror is that, in movies, you're thinking 'Don't look behind the door, you stupid git... Oh, you looked behind the door, what did I tell you? Muppet'

In games, you're thinking 'I wonder what's behind the door... Should I look behind the door? I'd better check just to be... AAAAAAAHOHSHITOHSHITGETITOFF!!!!'

You ain't the cynical, detached observer.

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I don't think any game has ever had a narrative that's moved me in the same way a book or film can. Walking Dead probably came closest, but that's no surprise given that it's essentially a film interspersed with small puzzles.

I have, however, come out of my favourite games and my favourite books with the same feeling: sadness that it's over, and that I can't spend any more time in that world with those characters. Off the top of my head, Secret of Mana, Monkey Island 2 and GTA V are all examples of that. Gorgeously realised worlds that I could happily lose entire days in, and often did as a teenager, usually with the curtains drawn when it was beautifully sunny outside. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

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The only thing that's come close to actually being moving, or at least staying with me (and I'm kinda amazed it hasn't been mentioned) is the last 15 minutes of "Little Inferno".

Seems like a silly indie game about burning things but from moment 1 it's setting you up.

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I don't think any game has ever had a narrative that's moved me in the same way a book or film can. Walking Dead probably came closest, but that's no surprise given that it's essentially a film interspersed with small puzzles.

I have, however, come out of my favourite games and my favourite books with the same feeling: sadness that it's over, and that I can't spend any more time in that world with those characters. Off the top of my head, Secret of Mana, Monkey Island 2 and GTA V are all examples of that. Gorgeously realised worlds that I could happily lose entire days in, and often did as a teenager, usually with the curtains drawn when it was beautifully sunny outside. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

This is a great post. Just the sheer amount of time spent with some games means you're highly likely to miss them when they're over.

The Last of Us DLC, Left Behind, is especially poignant in that sense because not only does it fill in a few blanks, a few unanswered questions, but Ellie herself is reminscing about her own past, about how she msses that part of her life. And the broken, fragile, violent environments just punctuate that even further. Paradise, long lost.

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The reveal of the final boss in Vagrant Story is the only game that's come close. I thought that was built up beautifully, totally unexpected and properly gobsmacking. It's a bloody good effort, but still not a patch on finding out quite what Kurt Vonnegut's Sirens of Titan does for your understanding of how much stuff matters in the scheme of things ;)

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I think the whole medium works better when you read a novella and then play a game.

I feel the book and game have more effect that way. For me thats the ideal way to combine the two. Read about a world and its characters and then live/play it. Almost like its a "preview" with a narrative.

For what its worth i have enjoyed my time with Bioshock 1 and 2.

I thought that integration worked well as did the Last of Us. But not really compared to a book (the last i read was The Road).

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Just reading through the thread and most of the ones that did it for me are listed.

Here's a theory. I think Paul McKenna didn't like Bioshock Infinite and has somehow hypnotised a bunch of gamers. Maybe he did it through some porn sites or on twitter or something but his message was strong.

"Ok and as you drift off to sleep listen to my voice. Whenever someone mentions Bioshock infinite you must tell them how much you dislike the game and make it clear that whoever likes it is wrong to do so. When you're slagging it off feel free to completely blow your points out of proportion and when others do the same don't challenge them on it. Aaaaaahd wake up, rise and shine"

One moment that really stuck out for me in SOTC was when I'd played a huge chunk of the game and happened to ride past where one of the colossi were. I had no idea that their bodies remained in the spot rotting away. I then went and visited the area where I'd killed the others one by one and hated myself more and more. Really powerful stuff.

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