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EA ANNOUNCES SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE ON XBOX ONE: EA ACCESS

$5 a month (or $30 a year) nets you unlimited access to a bunch of EA games.

BY COLIN MORIARTY
Today, EA revealed EA Access, an Xbox One-exclusive subscription service that grants players access to EA's so-called Vault.
Subscribing to EA Access will cost $4.99 a month (or $29.99 a year), and since the program is technically in beta, only four games will initially be available: FIFA 14, Madden NFL 25, Peggle 2, and Battlefield 4, "with more titles being added soon."
Battlefield 4 Xbox One Review Update
04:34
Additionally, EA Access will also net subscribers 10 percent discounts on all EA digital content, which includes full games and DLC, as well as access to trials of new EA games nearly a week before they come out (with saves that copy over to the final game, should you choose to purchase it later). Games that will be eligible for early access and save copy-over are Madden NFL 15, NHL 15, FIFA 15, NBA Live 15, and Dragon Age: Inquisition.
Memberships can be purchased on Xbox Live, and will also be available at retail stores like GameStop and online destinations like Amazon. The subscription service will launch "soon," according to EA, and will be available in North America and Europe.
We'll have more on EA Access as soon as it launches.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2014/07/29/ea-announces-subscription-service-on-xbox-one-ea-access

I'm guessing that within a year every major publisher will thus ask for a similar subscription.

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$29.99 for four games isn't bad at all. I know it's per year, but still, you're not going to play FIFA 14 and NFL25 next year are you?

It kind of confirms that EA was totally pumped for the original "dead second hand" Xbox One vision. So now they're going at it alone. Not that I care, I'm all digital myself. It does make me realise just how little interest I have in EA games in general.

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Now this could be interesting. I would LOVE a Netflix style subscription for games. Now, I know we probably wont get a catchall for all games, but if each publisher does it, it could end up driving down prices.

I would happily fork out £5 a month per publisher for games. Currently in looking at approx £500 in games between September and December. If I could get them all in a series of subs that cost a total of a few hundred a year (split over different publishers), id be all over it.

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Why is it only on the bone? I'm interested in playing Madden but not enough to cough up £50. So to play for a few quid a month for a couple of months would be ideal.

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Why is it only on the bone? I'm interested in playing Madden but not enough to cough up £50. So to play for a few quid a month for a couple of months would be ideal.

Because Sony has PS+ which does the same thing but for multiple publishers. Microsoft is still playing catch-up there and probably welcomed EA to do it themselves.

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But Microsoft has Games on Gold? Though I imagine they've probably been in talks with Microsoft about this for a while.

They do, but it's not exactly on par with PS+. Yet. This would help tide them over instead of going to individual publishers to broker deals.

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So will this only be for select games (ie. pretty useless) or a full service which gives you access to every new EA game after it comes out of beta? I can't really see them doing the latter, but it would be truly superb value if they did. £60 a year... I'd be all over that.

EDIT: Ah, I didn't read the annual charge after the monthly one. No chance of what I was hoping for, at £30 a year! But that's so little that the perks and savings make it worth the outlay anyway!

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So will this only be for select games (ie. pretty useless) or a full service which gives you access to every new EA game? I can't really see them doing the latter, but it would be truly superb value if they did. £60 a year... I'd be all over that.

It's older games - and so far, yearly franchises which have new instalments due in a couple of months. To me it looks like an attempt to nix pre-owned sales as these games reach the end of their cycle.

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You know for EA this works more than most.

Because a huge portion of EA's output is sports. Fifa, Madden, NBA, NHL....

And that's EXACTLY the kind of thing I'd love to be able to just subscribe to a rolling update of. Every year Fifa 15 effectively replaces Fifa 14 in a way that's not the case with say, Metal Gear or Tomb Raider.

But as Rain Birds points out, these are the soon to be old versions.

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This article on Polygon raises some interesting points regarding this 'new' subscription based model.

We may complain about this in the comments, but the reality of the situation is that this is the future we've built. We support this new age of limited ownership, of products that exist at the pleasure of the publishers and developers. We spend money on games and services, we prop up the minimum viable products that we like and support their ongoing development. We talk about convenience when we buy digitally, and we worry about things like pre-loading so we can play the moment the game is out, but we're ultimately discussing impermanence.

The stacks of NES games that I can still put in my system to play, the PlayStation One games that still work on my first-generation PlayStation 2, these are all relics for a time that has passed. We're not buying anymore, and EA is showing us the next step towards our rented future. This future comes with benefits, and we may save some money, but let's also understand what we're giving up, and why.

This is the way forward; the way of the future. Your kids won't mind that they don't own their games, they won't know any other reality. The rest of us will worry about what it all means, as we pay for the next piece of content that will blow away like sand the moment the Xbox Two is released, or will fade from memory as we hook up our PlayStation Fives.

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You'd have to wonder why they wouldn't stick FIFA 15 on pretty much immediately. They'd rather get subscriber numbers pumped up fast before MS get them with a similar scheme, I'd have thought.

I'd rather it had been one subscription per platform holder but I guess that isn't going to happen anytime soon.

Actually. What WOULD be ace if it's per publisher would be if it straddled more than just one platform. That would suit me juuuuust fine. One less reason to tie you to one platform.

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They'll never put FIFA 15 up immediately. They have a guaranteed userbase who buy each and every iteration on release. They'd only be eating into that.

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Yeah, it rather depends if Fifa 15 makes its way onto this in October 2014 or July 2015 doesn't it?

No. Absolutely not.

FIFA is £50 game brand new. You can't expect them to chuck it in with a bunch of other games on launch for as little as £4 (guess!) a month. That would make absolutely no sense.

This isn't for the day one boys. This is for people who want to play games they wouldn't normally play but don't want to pay full whack for them. We get an incredible deal, EA get money for what would have been a second hand sale, it's fucking perfect.

I'm really excited about this.

You'd have to wonder why they wouldn't stick FIFA 15 on pretty much immediately

Because FIFA sells millions at £50 a pop.

What is all this crazy talk?

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http://www.ea.com/uk/news/ea-announces-ea-access-coming-to-xbox-one

http://www.ea.com/eaaccess/en_GB

Confirmation of UK price there... £3.99 a month (though it says £4.99 in one place, which I'm guessing is just forgetting to change a number in the copy!), or £19.99 a year. Which is remarkably lower than expected!

EA Access membership unlocks The Vault, a collection of EA’s biggest games on Xbox One ready for you to download and play. During the beta, gamers will have unlimited access to four great EA games: EA SPORTS FIFA 14, EA SPORTS Madden NFL 25, Peggle 2 and Battlefield 4™, with more titles being added soon. That’s over £100 worth of games for £3.99 a month. You can play these EA favourites as much as you want with the click of a button.

We have partnered with Microsoft to deliver EA Access, an all-new monthly (or annual) membership for gamers exclusively on Xbox One that starts at just £3.99 a month. The service is being rolled out in beta to a limited number of players today, but it will launch for everyone on Xbox One soon.

You can join EA Access for just £4.99 per month, or you can purchase an annual membership for £19.99 per year on Xbox LIVE®.

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That's cheap, but it's another move towards renting games rather than buying them.

Also, I don't think I've ever spent more than £20 on EA games in a single year.

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That's cheap, but it's another move towards renting games rather than buying them.

If renting is the future, at this price, then sign me the fuck up.

Polygon sucking the corporate cock. Who'd have guessed?

Let's not forget Polygon's amazing review of Sim City.

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If renting is the future, at this price, then sign me the fuck up.

Depends on the company. As I said, £20 a year is more than I currently pay to *own* EA games.

Nintendo or Ubisoft though, and I might think differently.

EDIT: In fact, since the start of 2013, I've spent 66p on EA games. Since the start of 2012, it's about £17.

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They need a new revenue stream since E3 showed they have very little coming out in the next 12- 18 months.

Seems like a bargain but I wouldn't expect new titles to be added for at least 6 to 9 months after release and as for adding titles over time what have they got to add ? NFS Rivals and a wonky Bruce Lee game ?

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Despite being a hoarder of physical games, I have to admit that's the perfect price point for this kind of service.

Just wish Nintendo would do something similar for its virtual console stuff.

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I bet they've some 'HD' ports in the pipeline which they could throw out to increase the available titles.

Id pay £19.99 a year just for burnout revenge HD.

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I really hope they branch out to other platforms soon too. I'd happily pay £4 a month for access to nearly out of date sports titles and older EA games. If this does end up being the future and certain games basically become a subscription service like Netflix, then, yeah, I am happy with that.

I'd still buy NHL because I have a full interest in the sport and the game, but I likely won't buy FIFA and Madden year in year out and thus don't care for the rosters as much, so being a year behind the hardcore, whilst still playing other likeminded people online sounds good to me.

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