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Iconic environments in games?


Capwn
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For the purposes of a VR experience, it would be amazing to walk around some of the locations that I remember from very old games, perhaps ones with forced perspectives as well.

The morgue in SNES shadowrun for instance

Zak McKraken's flat (so long was spent in there....)

Some of the Dizzy locations...

Oh and Clumsy Colin's home town from the Skips game :D

Or the first level of original Prince of Persia.

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For the purposes of a VR experience, it would be amazing to walk around some of the locations that I remember from very old games,

My god, can you imagine the mansion from Jet Set Willy in 3D? It boggles the mind. Coloured bottles bouncing up and down, parading toilets, cyan saxophones floating past. For some reason I seem to think there were floating saxophones in Jet Set Willy, but I suspect that might just be wishful thinking.

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Alliance bastard!

I could lie about being some max level Horde scum and being impressed upon seeing it for the first time on an organised raid of the place, but I'm glad of my naive low level ally approach. One of the definitive "what the fuck am I getting myself into?" experiences in gaming.

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Generally I love well-realised cyberpunk slums, especially really tight multi-layered stuff reminiscent of hong kong. Fucking Heng-Sha in DXHR, man, imagine a full game city of just that. Brilliant.

Also Far Cry 2, just because we never get enough of those kinda biomes.

Lately though I've been looking at landscapes a LOT, and the morphology and stuff that makes them up....I paint a lot atm but suck at landscapes, so I like to build on my understanding. And I have to say, I have a soft spot for really extreme environments that push the boundaries of what you see in nature. Like, skyrim with those big basalt formations. Or giant flat-irons, or giant columns like you see in china.....Halo:Reach reminded me of that. They're pretty overblown, but not unrealistic.

I remember seeing this the other week (which someone also helpfully posted in the Space thread)

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/the-most-amazing-and-inspiring-vision-of-our-future-ive-1664783812

and couldnt help imagine what it'd be like if something like Mass Effect tackles such places. Imagine if the Mako sections were like that instead of using those old bumpmap-generated environments. Of course, most games use that as much as they can because it's quick, but it looks poor. Procedural generation has come along a lot though, going by things like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1O3XCsGnC8#t=409 or even that little Rodina indie game.

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Jesus, that mgs thing is fucking amazing!

And to think, unity can do shit in a browser that you used to need a console for. :)

Funny thing is, I always remember the ultra lo-res textures of the time having a certain charm that has apparently aged very well.

Also shows how cool that base was, I didnt really consider it until I found myself thinking the diorama couldve been twice the size and still not included all the coolest bits. Personally I spent a couple of minutes scanning around for the corridor of death, although the freezer section of death is also good. And the opening harbor. Man, that was a cool game.

I bet if someone made proper little plastic models of game scenes like that they'd make a fortune.

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