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Microsoft HoloLens - moar VR/AR


robdood
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Fair enough. Reception I've encountered has been tepid to say the least, which is unusual given the company I keep. It's the iPad* all over again.

*I've mentioned this a few times, but I'm no fan of Apple. Think we all get the analogy.

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Exactly. You won't get all the stuff in that video n 6 months. 5 years from now? I reckon most of that stuff will be doable.

Techies are a fickle, weird bunch. Looking back in time for 5 years, is crazy for most of our lifes. Netbooks were the cool thing... For 12 months. iPad? Lol. We could try pick what we will be doing tech wise in 5 years now, and I doubt many would get close. The obvious one is a comfortably, wearable oculus / AR hybrid. And I for one cannot wait for it!

Imagine Apple launch a pair of wearable VR/AR glasses, that actually look and feel like glasses, in.... 36 months. You control it from your iPhone. It overlays maps and floaty screens with voice commands. Boom.

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They're very different things, though. I think AR wearables are a stepping stone to the holographic projections in Iron Man.

I think its that I cannot see how any overlaid graphics on my living room/games room can be made interesting for the type of games I like playing. Whereas VR fully takes you away from reality into another place and is likely to host the games I'm interested in. The way I currently see it is that AR is more dare I say a novelty for me or more applicable to productivity tasks rather than gaming. I can see games on this being popular for the occasional gamer who plays candy crush. Perhaps in the far off future when then tech is far more mature it would be more my thing but I'm likely to be using a zimmerframe at that point so could not take advantage of it.

I can imagine paintball with all users wearing AR devices would be cool but with AR'd real world guns and AR simulated blood on your kills but that's a way off

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I don't know why I've been negged for my comment about pixel darkening, but if I've misunderstood something then an explanation would be appreciated.

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That article posted above seems a bit contradictory to me. When he gets onto per pixel darkening, he doesn't explain why focussing on that is impossible and would cause a big smudgy dark area, yet none of the other rendered graphics would blur. Surely either everything's blurry or not. Why would there be a distinction?

You don't agree with an article pointing out possible problems with something Microsoft are trying to sell? What did the newspapers and the president say when you told them?

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Huh? I'm just questioning the article and hoping someone more knowledgeable than myself can explain his discrepancies. I can't see anywhere where I've blindly praised it just because you've got some weird belief that I must love it because it's being developed by MS.

Just to put your mind at rest, yes I do think it sounds quite interesting, but get this, I won't believe it until I see it can actually do the things they're touting. And at the moment, i'm as dubious about it as I was, and still am, about Kinect.

Now, have you got anything useful to add?

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I think its that I cannot see how any overlaid graphics on my living room/games room can be made interesting for the type of games I like playing. Whereas VR fully takes you away from reality into another place and is likely to host the games I'm interested in. The way I currently see it is that AR is more dare I say a novelty for me or more applicable to productivity tasks rather than gaming. I can see games on this being popular for the occasional gamer who plays candy crush. Perhaps in the far off future when then tech is far more mature it would be more my thing but I'm likely to be using a zimmerframe at that point so could not take advantage of it.

I can imagine paintball with all users wearing AR devices would be cool but with AR'd real world guns and AR simulated blood on your kills but that's a way off

I'm quite interested in how it can work alongside gaming on a TV screen now. If the Hololens can track objects then it can track your TV, which means you could be playing a game and have objects coming out of the screen, flying around the room and then going back in to the screen, etc. ( vague, but you get the idea).

I think there's an issue with full VR sets in that they are completely immersive and take your full attention, this AR stuff seems to be a nice balance between giving use more immersion in games (hopefully) but then also being able to stop and check your emails or answer your phone.

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To guess an answer to your question Jon, I think may be because the 'light' is projected, but the 'dark' would have to be physically placed right in front of your eyes.

Thanks.

Maybe then, if that's how it works. I assumed it was like Google Glass, where the image is only visible to the wearer. Meaning both the projected graphics and the pixel darkening are on the same focal plane.

Like I say though, I'm no expert, so my understanding could be completely off.

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ZX Speccy four eyes, can't wait.

Like life, technology always finds a way. They will find ways to shrink it down, make wireless, figure something out for rgb to work etc.

I think the bigger problems AR faces is more to do with user behaivior rather than is it possible. Outside gaming/tech lovers; who would use/wear any of it? Think we are looking at something that will need years of (mind) change for it to be something a general user would be comfortable to use on a daily basis.

Makes sense for gaming I'm all up for immersion. Outside of entertainment, I'm not sure. I can change a lightbulb myself, and even as a tech lover, I'm not sure how invasive this all looks. Imagine a UI over your baby saying the nappy is 67% full (the kind of 'innovation' app developers now come up with), it's like our basic instincts are being replaced.

Holy shit I'm getting old now.

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With regards to the screen darkening, again hypothetically...The goggles/glasses sit behind the viewpoint of the "hologram", so could you not use some sort of photochromic lens to darken the glass as needs be. I don't know whether it is possible, but hypothetically you could focus it so only certain parts of the glass darken at certain times? I know current lens used by Transitions, etc, darken the whole glass and it takes time to go from clear to dark back to clear again, but there must be a way to do selective, instantaneous darkening.

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People keep saying that they'll shrink the tech, like that's some inevitable law. Electronic components may get miniaturised over time, but with optical components you cannae change the laws of physics.

And electronic components are starting to get to the point of help-physics too.

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I think its that I cannot see how any overlaid graphics on my living room/games room can be made interesting for the type of games I like playing. Whereas VR fully takes you away from reality into another place and is likely to host the games I'm interested in. The way I currently see it is that AR is more dare I say a novelty for me or more applicable to productivity tasks rather than gaming. I can see games on this being popular for the occasional gamer who plays candy crush. Perhaps in the far off future when then tech is far more mature it would be more my thing but I'm likely to be using a zimmerframe at that point so could not take advantage of it.

I can imagine paintball with all users wearing AR devices would be cool but with AR'd real world guns and AR simulated blood on your kills but that's a way off

Yes, it's probably a novelty for gamers. I think Microsoft's mistake was pitching it as a gaming device. How it's being used at JPL is far, far more interesting.

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Yes, it's probably a novelty for gamers. I think Microsoft's mistake was pitching it as a gaming device. How it's being used at JPL is far, far more interesting.

They haven't pitched it primarily as a gaming device.

I'm not sure about the JPL example. It smacks heavily of governmental organisation doing some PR to me, rather than a scientifically useful (or mission planning) tool.

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  • 1 month later...

http://canadianonlinegamers.com/2015/03/microsoft-hololens-project-designer-killed-in-drunk-driving-hit-and-run/

Microsoft’s promising new HoloLens project suffered a truly unfortunate set back recently as one of it’s project designers, Mike Ey (30), was involved in a fatal hit-and-run incident this past Saturday morning.

According to news reports Mike was hit from behind by Robert Malsch on State Route 520 in Redmond, WA. Narrowly missing another driver before ploughing into Mr. Ey’s vehicle it was also reported that Malsch’s vehicle was driving over 100 mph. Seen running from the scene Mr. Malsch was later apprehended by police and is now facing with vehicular homicide and felony hit and run charges.

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