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True Detective - Season 2


Mentazm
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The director has left too though.

Vaughn was ok in Swingers a very long time ago. Farrell I can't think of anything he's been good in but that's just me.

Maybe season 3 will star Kevin Hart and Danny Dyer :lol:

I'm not saying this won't be good, but there's a hell of a lot to prove.

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That trailer has sold me on Colin, he's appeared in a lot of fluff but every now again he can pull in strong performances. I think he will be this season's 'Woody' in a 'Ohh, he's actually pretty good!' sense. Vince, even in this trailer, looks a little awkward. Most importantly, it's looking like it's lacking a McConaughey.

I hope I am proven wrong and that Colin is the McConaughey and Vince is the 'Ohh, he's actually pretty good!' guy.

Get out of here! Woody has always been pretty good.

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I think Farrell will be pretty good. If we're concerned that he's starred in some shit movies, McConaughey was arguably more lazy than Farrell has ever been. How many years did he spend making shit rom-coms, and getting arrested for playing bongos in the nuddy? Too many. But he turned in a great performance in True Detective. So I'm hopeful for the second season.

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  • 1 month later...

I know people say that, but I've only seen snippets of the films and the trailers, so I don't really know. Plenty of people I trust have said they're terrible and at least what I think they are is kind of the opposite of what appealed to me about the first season of true detective.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Reviews have started popping up for the first three episodes on sites. Pretty mixed. Variety is the most downbeat of them-

Those expecting anything approaching the magic conjured by the original Matthew McConaughey-Woody Harrelson pairing should immediately temper their enthusiasm for "True Detective's" second season. Impeccably cast around its marquee stars, the new plot possesses the requisite noir-ish qualities, but feels like a by-the-numbers potboiler, punctuated by swooping aerial shots of L.A. courtesy of new director Justin Lin, whose intense close-ups bring to mind a Sergio Leone western. Although generally watchable, the inspiration that turned the first into an obsession for many seems to have drained out of writer Nic Pizzolatto's prose, at least three hours into this eight-episode run. Once the ball gets rolling, though, the new "Detective" feels increasingly mundane — in tone and style, a bit like a lesser Michael Mann movie stretched out in episodic form.


Esquire is more upbeat.

Based on the three episodes HBO sent to critics, the second season of "True Detective" is nearly as addictive as the first. (And like that one, it is created and written entirely by Nic Pizzolatto, though with a new cast, story, and directors.) It poses as a potboiler, but it's really an exercise in genre fused with existentialism. This time, instead of "The King in Yellow," a copy of the "Hagakure" sits on a coffee table.

More highlights here- they're all spoiler free, except the Hollywood Reporter one has minor spoilers about one of the character's family situation, so if you want to go in blind (and it's only a small thing) I'd suggesting skipping over that.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/criticwire/first-reviews-true-detective-season-2-loses-the-light-20150612

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I've heard it used quite a lot before, although usually for crime novels.

The Vulture one review pretty complimentary and I find them pretty trustworthy. It's a shame there's no occult stuff this time round, it did give the first season a weird and unpredictable edge unlike most cop dramas out there.

We know only that Pizzolatto and Lin are in full command of their medium. Season two of True Detective is a nasty treat for the eyes and ears. Every few minutes, there’s an image that’s as meaningful as it is lovely to look at: a wide shot of a seedy bar near a railroad track lit like an Edward Hopper painting; a low-angle pan across a stretch of elevated highway that makes it seem as though you’re an ant watching a python slither past; a helicopter shot of intersecting overpasses that visually establishes Southern California, and America, as a co-dependency of interests. Throughout, the synthesized score keeps rumbling and droning. We’re in the belly of some rough beast.

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I'd quite like it to be more down the line, I think that element in the first series gave it an edge that didn't quite pay off in the end.

I read a lot of pot-boiler pulpy books as a kid. Mostly horror, but some crime fic too.

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The lack of any occult stuff is a bit worrying, as without that the first series was a very conventional crime story. It had that same plot that most James Ellroy books have, and that same structure, whereby Councillor Jack Pillarofthecommunity pops up right at the start, slapping everyone on the back and telling them he hopes they get this scumbag, and then, gasp, he turns out to be a wrongun. The occult stuff really made the first series – it turned it from this formulaic crime flick into this sweaty, lurid trawl through the dankest channels of the human subconscious that was insanely compelling. I really hope there’s something else to replace that.

That said, with Justin Lin manning the controls, I hope they have a bit where one of the true detectives suddenly remembers that he used to be a hitman for the Mexican drug cartels or something, which leads into a whole sequence where they basically do live-action Grand Theft Auto for most of an episode and then never mention it again. It would be as incongruous as last time, but fucking hell, it would look amazing.

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The lack of any occult stuff is a bit worrying, as without that the first series was a very conventional crime story. It had that same plot that most James Ellroy books have, and that same structure, whereby Councillor Jack Pillarofthecommunity pops up right at the start, slapping everyone on the back and telling them he hopes they get this scumbag, and then, gasp, he turns out to be a wrongun. The occult stuff really made the first series – it turned it from this formulaic crime flick into this sweaty, lurid trawl through the dankest channels of the human subconscious that was insanely compelling. I really hope there’s something else to replace that.

I disagree with this. Sure the occult stuff was interesting but True Detective has a lot more going for it than that - notably an absolutely singularly oppressive and thick atmosphere, a vibe. I don't know how to explain it except to say that it has the feel of a novel in the form of a TV drama. I can almost feel the heat and the sweat.

I don't think the occult is the attraction of the show. It has incredible performances, a great script, it's beautifully composed and shot - it's just great across the board.

It's about about obsession, people, the strangeness of the human experience, dirt and yeah a bit of strange occult spice. But I just don't think it's as central as the way you describe it.

That said I've always felt like TD would be a true one-off - it just has too many elements working perfectly together. I'm sure season 2 will be decent but season is going to stay unique. Fuck me Harrelson and McConaughey were superb.

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Hmm... AV Club are usually pretty reliable for me with their reviews, and they're pretty down on the new season.

http://www.avclub.com/review/going-straight-struggle-true-detective-220828

“Why would I do another buddy-cop show?” asks True Detective creator Nic Pizzolatto in a recent Vanity Fair profile. “I think whatever I had to say about the buddy-cop genre, I said.” More’s the pity. In place of Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson bickering on long car rides and gradually figuring out how to work together on a high-stakes serial killer case, season two offers four individuals so isolated and angsty that the one buddy-cop scene late in the second episode is just about the only thing in the first three that gives hope for the season.

Pizzolatto asks, “Do you really just want to see two stars riding around in a car talking?” Does he really not understand what drew people to season one?

Season two of True Detective is a different animal, a linear L.A. detective story about a dead city manager with mob ties, but the case that binds the four main characters doesn’t generate many sparks...

....The result is monotony. Season one spiced up its mood with a pungent mix of buddy-cop comedy, surreal horror, and mystery. Season two is serious people doing serious things all the time. None of these characters have ever found anything funny in their lives, and none of them have anything interesting to offer one another (or us) beyond solving the case. When they’re exasperated with one another, they clench their teeth and shut up at the cost of so much drama.


I'm still keen to see it when it kicks off on Sunday (or Monday for me according to the cable schedule) and see where it goes, but expectations are a bit lower. Still, the first season was, as Smitty said, such a perfect storm of different components coming together, it's maybe raised the bar a bit unfairly for season two.

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