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19 hours ago, Art Vandelay said:

That's mental, I've literally never seen a spread in asking prices as wild as that. It's sold for a fiver a few times, then 20 quid, £1,500 and now someone wants nearly six large for it! The original Blue Notes are stupidly priced. Yo Yo Records opposite Hackney Farm seems to have a good source of them but they're not exactly priced to move. 

 

Had a look at Yo Yo Records website and they've got the two Monk's Genius of... vol 1 & 2 for £400 each, which seems to be the normal going rate for Blue Note first editions. 

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10 minutes ago, Ste_S said:

Had a look at Yo Yo Records website and they've got the two Monk's Genius of... vol 1 & 2 for £400 each, which seems to be the normal going rate for Blue Note first editions. 

 

I think their website is a temporary Covid thing and isn't exhaustive of everything they have in stock unfortunately. It's worth a peruse if you're ever round that way, if only just to see some of these fabled items. I remember reading how vast quantities of these pressings ended up in Japan over the years. There were certainly lots when I was looking, but ended up buying 10 times as much by getting the 60/70s represses. They'd be lovely to have though. Anyway, CDs...

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I've bought several job lots of CDs on eBay over the last year or so. I can't say I'm keeping many of them, but it's a cheap way to get an interesting digital collection, plus I would expect to break even by selling the more desirable items on Discogs (assuming the marketplace doesn't crash and burn). The charity shops can have the rest and some are going straight in the bin. 

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10 hours ago, Art Vandelay said:

Anyway, CDs...

 

Last eBay Discman turned out to be a dud, so replacement bought. Sounds great and very happy with it.

 

IMG_1565.jpeg

 

Also, last batch of new CDs bought for a total of £20. Unfortunately I'm beginning to realise that the RVG editions of Blue Note CDs sound like shit- compressed stereo, no bottom end and very harsh treble. They end up sounding better on headphones on the Discman with the Mega Bass turned to max than they do on my stereo. Still, at £3 each I can't complain too much.

 

In contrast, Ray Charles- What'd I Say sounds amazing. Despite it being Mono it's got a much bigger soundstage and the dynamics are much better balanced. No complaints with the Chet Baker or Blossom Dearie either.

 

IMG_1564.jpeg

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On 02/10/2020 at 23:30, Ste_S said:

 

Last eBay Discman turned out to be a dud, so replacement bought. Sounds great and very happy with it.

 

IMG_1565.jpeg

 

Also, last batch of new CDs bought for a total of £20. Unfortunately I'm beginning to realise that the RVG editions of Blue Note CDs sound like shit- compressed stereo, no bottom end and very harsh treble. They end up sounding better on headphones on the Discman with the Mega Bass turned to max than they do on my stereo. Still, at £3 each I can't complain too much.

 

In contrast, Ray Charles- What'd I Say sounds amazing. Despite it being Mono it's got a much bigger soundstage and the dynamics are much better balanced. No complaints with the Chet Baker or Blossom Dearie either.

 

IMG_1564.jpeg

 

That's the Discman I had in the 90's! Seeing it brings back many happy memories.

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  • 4 months later...

Currently wondering what to do with my collection, as I just can’t justify the space anymore (boxes and boxes!). I have several thousand that have all been ripped over the years, and I literally never look at the discs. They average about 30p a disc for the stuff Music Magpie will take (which seems to be about a quarter), so I’m pondering just keeping the discs (and maybe booklets and tray liners too) and binning the cases so it takes up a more manageable space, but that almost seems worse than just getting rid entirely!

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25 minutes ago, MrPogo said:

Currently wondering what to do with my collection, as I just can’t justify the space anymore (boxes and boxes!). I have several thousand that have all been ripped over the years, and I literally never look at the discs. They average about 30p a disc for the stuff Music Magpie will take (which seems to be about a quarter), so I’m pondering just keeping the discs (and maybe booklets and tray liners too) and binning the cases so it takes up a more manageable space, but that almost seems worse than just getting rid entirely!

 

Tough call if you haven't used them in a long time and have no desire to. Several thousand is a huge amount!

 

If you bin them or sell them on, you'll never be able to get them back. Most CD's are out of print these days, and the ones that are currently are usually shitty remasters.

 

I'd say definitely slim down your collection and be ruthless (how many times would I listen to it etc.) but maybe keep a thousand! :)

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I barely listen to CDs any more but I also don’t really want to get rid of my favourites. I’ll sell anything I don’t enjoy listening to from start to finish, with the exception of a few compilations that are 90% gold. Discogs is a good selling platform if you price sensibly. 

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I’m definitely keeping a core collection of favourites, along with all the limited edition and signed stuff, but I’m very stuck on what to do with the rest. I probably should try discogs and very much price to sell, but would rather have a swift bulk solution!

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  • 4 weeks later...

Should You Get Rid Of Your CDs?

 

Going to quote the article here as it is pathetically short: 

 

When compact discs started arriving on the shelves of Woolworths in the 1980s, liberated boomers set about chucking out all the vinyl clogging up their entertainment centres. After an investment in a three-disc changer and some CD towers, they could rest easy in the assurance that they were future-proofed. A couple of decades, and a few music industry meltdowns later, no one wants CDs any more. Music is now nebulous, swirling round us like a particularly tuneful dust storm or, in the case of Gary Barlow’s new album, a fart in a lift.

 

And here millennials sit, following begrudgingly in the boomers’ wake, at the centre of a generational Venn diagram: in the unique position of having CDs, vinyl and iTunes and streaming. For the best part of a year now, it’s been time for a clearout: so as we edge back to something resembling a normal life, dare we take the ultimate decluttering step and eschew our CD collections?

 

We have heard the vinyl regret stories from the boomers: “should have held on to that’; “a much richer sound”. They gaze longingly at Discogs, masochistically checking how much that Boney M picture disc is worth now. Will millennials be putting themselves in the same position? Vinyl has seen a resurgence in sales surpassing any expectations; even the cassette tape – the clunkiest format since the shellac disc – has seen a comeback. CDs are unlikely to enjoy such a renaissance: they are inherently unlovable, with none of the richness or tactile nature of vinyl, or the kooky, Urban Outfitters irony of tapes. They remain covetable only as part of deluxe eight-disc box sets containing five to 75 versions of the same song.

 

But is it safe to destroy your collection? With a monthly streaming subscription, or even the likes of iTunes, we are paying for a licence to listen to the music, not ownership of the music itself. What if, as happened last month with a number of K-pop songs on Spotify, the music we hold dear and listen to every day suddenly disappears? Or, worse, what if in 15 years’ time, the streaming services fold altogether? We will be bereft, and our Songs to Cry To playlist will be inaccessible. In a drawer under the bed, however, your trusty copy of Now 33 will always be waiting.

 

Of course, there are sentimental reasons for holding on to our CDs, too. For some of us, they are a physical manifestation of youth; a disc-by-disc autobiography. Some even still have the price stickers from shops long since closed (RIP, The Longplayer Tunbridge Wells). The behemoths – Tower Records, Virgin Megastores, Our Price – all vanished eventually, but we still have the music we bought there.


So, as we reconsider the worth of the supposed heirlooms that have been gathering dust in the loft, the clothes that have never been worn, the boxes of guff vying with the car for garage space – even the friends or acquaintances who have shown themselves to be surplus to requirements have been ditched – should the CD collection survive? Amid our stressful lives and the fresh starts we’re about to embark upon, our CDs are scratched little time capsules worth holding on to.

 

From The Guardian, tedious boomers vs millenials bollocks, CDs are described as "unloveable" as, apparently, it doesn't have the cache of vinyl or the hipster chic of cassettes. The conclusion from the frankly pathetic piece is that we should hold onto CDs purely for sentimental reasons. 

 

I've been a vocal champion of CDs in this thread for years simply because there's so much fantastic music out there for cheap on CDs, stuff that isn't on any streaming service, music that wouldn't necessarily benefit from being on a £25+ bit of vinyl. CDs themselves may not be loveable, but the music they contain, you know, the important bit, is what's key.  Spotify and co are highly unlikely to ever go down, there's too much invested in it by Big Music, they'd do everything in their power to have something like that there as they love the idea of people renting music. Having CDs as a backup is okay if you have the space, but for me I'm moving more towards a small, curated collection rather than every CD I can get my hands on. 

 

And the next person I hear banging on about boomers and millenials it's getting a sharpened CD through the neck. 

 

 

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I've bought a bunch of CD's already this year - a few cheap 90s dance singles and some compilations, mostly for one particular track that I couldn't find as a digital download, but it's always nice to see what else you might enjoy on the disc.

 

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I'm still buying at least 5 discs a month, mostly classical at the moment, which I find is great to work to. I've got a Denon micro system on my WFH desk with a pair of Dali Spektor 1 speakers either side of my monitor, and I'm in hog heaven.

 

I'm listening to the Sayonara Wild Hearts OST off YouTube at the moment though, and it kills me that there's no physical release on CD, only vinyl. Although it did lead me to get into School of Seven Bells and hoover up all their CDs, so there's that.

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28 minutes ago, acidbearboy said:

I've bought a bunch of CD's already this year - a few cheap 90s dance singles and some compilations, mostly for one particular track that I couldn't find as a digital download, but it's always nice to see what else you might enjoy on the disc.

 

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I love all those Too Slow to Disco records , their Bandcamp is great 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, you’re either suggesting that I’d keep it because it’s musically excellent or that I’d have to keep it because no bastard would buy it. I’ll go with the latter! Although saying that, No Limit was one of first singles I ever bought, but listening back now time hasn’t been kind to it. 

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I’m definitely more of a singles/compilations type of guy than full artist albums. But I’d say that I collect great music, not a particular format. Currently, MP3 is king for me purely due to convenience. Some of these singles have a particular remix or tracks not found elsewhere on CD or digital. I’ll rip them all, delete the rubbish and sell most of the discs on (hopefully at least breaking even).

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Got my CDs out of the loft this weekend and stuck some AAs in the trusty CD walkman I had as a teenager to listen to some stuff:

 

IMG_20210406_122741.thumb.jpg.b23868b5e37f4fb481a3768a62a4a7ae.jpg

 

I'm sure there are technically much better players out there but I still love the sound of this thing. Shudder to think I went from this to 192kbps MP3s.

 

As well as the nostalgia trip of the Walkman above, I have a Marantz player as part of my living room hi-fi set up that has been criminally neglected over the last couple of years. I gave Automatic for the People a spin on it last night and it was revelatory.

 

Why did I ditch this format?

 

I mean, there were some legitimate reasons I've gravitated to vinyl for physical purchases over the last 10 years. Some stuff only being on vinyl, the aesthetics of the records, my strong aversion to the compression used in much digital production from 1999 onwards and vinyl at least having a physical limitation to how aggressively that can be applied.

 

But maybe I should start picking up CDs as well where the above is less of a consideration. There's so many well mastered albums on CD going for no money at all. I just need to find a practical way to store them that doesn't involve putting them on show - weirdly I quite like the look of the cases individually but stacked up or on a shelf not so much. I'd already whittled my collection down to my 200 or so favourites so I don't have loads, but still enough to present a logistical problem, especially if I need room for expansion. Hmm.

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20 hours ago, Marlowe said:

I'm sure there are technically much better players out there but I still love the sound of this thing. Shudder to think I went from this to 192kbps MP3s.

 

It is probably down to the analogue headphone out that makes it sound better. There is a lot to be said for analogue out, and cables.

 

I'm a bit of a luddite with Bluetooth (its too many things to press to get it synced up ffs!) but I've only recently realised that my when I connect my Sony Digital Walkman up to my Bluetooth headphones - none of the sound modes on the Walkman actually transfer to the headphones - its just a flat response type thing that gets output to the headphones. 

 

The only way I can dig into the true sound quality of the Walkman is to plug a cable into it and use the headphones that way. 

 

I don't think 192kbps MP3's sound that bad to be honest, but if you ripped a CD you listened to on your CD Walkman as 192 MP3 and then listened to it on another device, I'm sure that it would sound different, but its not always about the bitrate, more the actual electronics used to give you that sound out to your ears.

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Can anybody recommend some CD cleaning gear? I don't really think I need anything as serious as a buffing machine, but I often find that used CDs need a wipe clean when they arrive to remove dust and grime. I currently give them a gentle wipe with a cleaning cloth for glasses. 

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57 minutes ago, acidbearboy said:

Can anybody recommend some CD cleaning gear? I don't really think I need anything as serious as a buffing machine, but I often find that used CDs need a wipe clean when they arrive to remove dust and grime. I currently give them a gentle wipe with a cleaning cloth for glasses. 

 

Cotton wool balls and some multi-surface polish do the trick and does not scratch. Also if the artwork looks a bit grubby, apply a bit of polish to the ball then wipe the artwork. Its how Oxfam revitalise old book covers. 

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I find moist breath and the bottom of my t-shirt fixes most discs, with a wet glasses cloth the next step up. I’ll sometimes fully immerse a disc in water if it’s particularly bad. 
 

Don’t ever get discs made by Nimbus wet, though. The silkscreen will slough off and take the metallic surface with it. They’re pretty easily identified though, with “Mastered by Nimbus” in the matrix. 

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On 15/03/2021 at 16:12, acidbearboy said:

CDs photos

+1 for that Hed Kandi CD;  Beach House is quality and their whole range was completely brilliant before they got acquired.

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