Jump to content
IGNORED

Horizon Zero Dawn


Nespresso
 Share

Recommended Posts

And finished. Great game, but still not my GOTY (I think Yakuza 0 spoiled me).

 

 

The masters spoken of by Sylens are probably the Titans that want to be re-awoken, which I hope is not what will happen, as its too similar to Mass Effect (as I think Gorf mentioned in one of his posts), but the panning out of the camera to show a Titan after Sylens little monologue at the end about HADES masters makes it seem likely. I guess we'll have to wait and see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think that would make much sense.

 

(ENDING SPOILERS)

 

Spoiler

 

Recap of what we know:

 

The Titans - and all the other war machines - were shut down ~60 years after Zero Day, once the relevant Subordinate Function of GAIA had cracked the codes and broadcast the shutdown signal via the Spires.

 

Fast-forward ~1000 years... (19 years before Game Present)

 

A mysterious signal of unknown origin gets into GAIA's network, transforming HADES and the other Subordinate Functions into "unregulated, self-aware entities of a highly chaotic nature".

 

Realising that HADES would take control of the terraforming systems and initiate the Extinction Protocol, GAIA destroyed the GAIA Prime reactor, sacrificing "herself" so as to stop HADES. GAIA also instructed the Nora Cradle to clone Elisabet, so that that clone could later reboot GAIA and enable the terraforming system to be brought under control again (and so stop the Derangement that would be caused by the lack of GAIA's control).

 

HADES then used a virus to unshackle itself (and the other newly self-aware Subordinate Functions) and promptly escaped into the core of a derelict Titan.

 

GAIA instructed the Elisabet clone to first acquire the Master Override, and use it to purge HADES, before then rebooting GAIA.

 

 

 

How could a Titan have sent the signal that woke HADES? The Titans and all the other war machines were shutdown. And if a Titan (or Titans) were already awake, somehow, then why the need to also wake HADES? If one or more Titans were already awake, they could just do what they did previously and build more and more machines, and use the Corruptors to enslave any not already with them. They wouldn't need HADES. Also, the Titans and other machines in the Faro Swarm weren't, IIRC, self-aware at all in any way - they were just following their (glitched) programming: EAT AND REPLICATE AND EAT AND REPLICATE... There was nothing to indicate they'd have the intelligence to go "MUST AWAKE HADES" (and no reason that they would know of HADES).

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Tezcatlipoca said:

I don't think that would make much sense.

 

(ENDING SPOILERS)

 

  Hide contents

 

Recap of what we know:

 

The Titans - and all the other war machines - were shut down ~60 years after Zero Day, once the relevant Subordinate Function of GAIA had cracked the codes and broadcast the shutdown signal via the Spires.

 

Fast-forward ~1000 years... (19 years before Game Present)

 

A mysterious signal of unknown origin gets into GAIA's network, transforming HADES and the other Subordinate Functions into "unregulated, self-aware entities of a highly chaotic nature".

 

Realising that HADES would take control of the terraforming systems and initiate the Extinction Protocol, GAIA destroyed the GAIA Prime reactor, sacrificing "herself" so as to stop HADES. GAIA also instructed the Nora Cradle to clone Elisabet, so that that clone could later reboot GAIA and enable the terraforming system to be brought under control again (and so stop the Derangement that would be caused by the lack of GAIA's control).

 

HADES then used a virus to unshackle itself (and the other newly self-aware Subordinate Functions) and promptly escaped into the core of a derelict Titan.

 

GAIA instructed the Elisabet clone to first acquire the Master Override, and use it to purge HADES, before then rebooting GAIA.

 

 

 

How could a Titan have sent the signal that woke HADES? The Titans and all the other war machines were shutdown. And if a Titan (or Titans) were already awake, somehow, then why the need to also wake HADES? If one or more Titans were already awake, they could just do what they did previously and build more and more machines, and use the Corruptors to enslave any not already with them. They wouldn't need HADES. Also, the Titans and other machines in the Faro Swarm weren't, IIRC, self-aware at all in any way - they were just following their (glitched) programming: EAT AND REPLICATE AND EAT AND REPLICATE... There was nothing to indicate they'd have the intelligence to go "MUST AWAKE HADES" (and no reason that they would know of HADES).

 

 

 

The alpha version of APOLLO would. But yeah, as I said I hope its not that.

 

Sequel/Expansion will probably be something to do with the Banuk and/or Oseram, as there's roads to the north that you are told to turn back or the game will load the most recent save.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a vendor in Meridian that sells machine hearts (maybe the lens bits as well, I cant remember), so you don't really need to hang on to any machine parts other than the braiding bits (luminous and crystal braiding) I think, as he wont sell those as far as I can remember.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man, played this at launch for about 3-4 hours and really enjoyed it but then Zelda came and I didn't play Horizon for 2-3 weeks. Last night I tried returning and it was such a struggle, even found myself trying to get up steep mountains wanting to just glide down to get to X. My main tactic is to just hide in grass, whistle and strike which isn't very fun. Also miss being able to manually save anywhere like in Zelda. I had a objective that was a long distance away, finally got there after a few battles and died. Had to restart all over again. Menus seem over complex and uninviting too.

 

Zelda has destroyed gaming for me I think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The stealth is far too easy, it's true. I rarely used it once in combat one I was a bit into the game. But some of the other criticisms seem a bit off - 'I want to be able to manually save like in Zelda - I went a long way to an objective and died and was back at the start.' Well, if it was a long way away, there will have been lots of bonfires near the route - I mean, they're scattered everywhere, all over the map. You're probably just not looking for them or using them, i.e. playing the game the way it's been designed to play. And BotW has hardly revolutionised the genre (or even Zelda) in that respect - if saving anywhere has spoilt you for all other games, I guess you've been spoilt by all other games for many years, because lots of games let you save anywhere. It's not really an innovation in Zelda.

 

'I find myself trying to get up steep mountains wanting to just glide down to get to X.' Yeah, but that's like saying 'in Zelda, I found myself trying to fashion machinery to override enemies - I wanted to set one off against another.' It's just a mechanic from a completely different game that wouldn't fit this one.

 

It feels like some people aren't so much critical of a game in its own terms so much as simply wanting it to be just like another game. If the preference is so strong that you simply don't feel like playing other games, that's fair enough. But the best thing there is not to. Anyone not having fun exploring the landscapes of Horizon or fighting against the machines should probably write it off rather than persist, because aside from the story (which it must be said ends up pretty great), that's basically what the game is. There's not much point in persisting if the basic mechanics aren't doing it for you (which is why I didn't bother picking up MEA after the ten-hour trial - I just wasn't feeling the combat, crafting or exploration at all - let alone the story). Just play something you do enjoy instead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Blagged a copy of this last week, and after an initially underwhelming start something clicked shortly after I was in a field of Striders and blew one up with a fire arrow. I can't quite put the precise moment into words but the game suddenly felt a lot more absorbing and the demand for wanting to see more of what is going on went up several notches. Still very much early in the game, but liking the juxtaposition between a pretty, tranquil open world and the fearsome robo-beasts ready to rip your face off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm still fairly early in the game, I think. It's time to move out of the Sacred Lands and uncloud the next part of the map, with quests giving me a direct line to Meridian. It was pretty epic when you step out of the Sacred Lands and see... basically Monument Valley. And you realise that not everyone is a tribal hunter living in wooden huts... the other tribes built a civilisation!

 

So I'm near that decision in large open-world RPGs where it's time to go to the 'capital city' of the gameworld. I usually hesitate and try to do everything else first, because you know you'll get flooded with sidequests and errands when you go there.

 

I'm not great in combat. Stealth is great at first, but only against the smallest easiest machines you can take down in one hit. Anything bigger, and shit kicks off... and I tend to panic and fluster when shit kicks off. I'm not sure I'll ever memorise which bits of machines must be shot off with which types of arrows.

 

It's also funny how procedural 'shit hitting the fan' moments can happen -- like an NPC running into a field of Watchers, who attracted three Sawtooths - the NPC seemed invincible because he was attached to a sidequest, but he certainly couldn't do any damage to the Sawtooths, and neither could I because it was still early-game and I was terrified of them. Then a few more machines came to see what the fuss was about, and it got funnier and funnier. I had to quick-travel away.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 23 March 2017 at 11:34, Darren said:

They've made this beautiful, detailed world and filled it with robot animals that you can fight, tame or set off fighting against each other, and loads of nooks and crannies to explore and little touches all over the place. Why would you want to just teleport past it all to get to the next destination? The journey is wonderful.

 

Open world fatigue is why. It is diverting to explore the world and fight all the different animals, but in reality you'll be doing a lot of that via the main story and side quests anyway. Some of the stuff like bandit camps and the like are a bit too familiar, plus when you get into the main story it becomes quite compelling and you want to advance it a bit faster than 'ride halfway across the map to fresh intrigue.' 

 

I did a mix of roaming and fast travel and it felt like a good balance. Loved exploring, but it became a bit farcical to do a ten minute horse ride just to trade some stuff in. Especially in the second map which, while it has its charms, wasn't as interesting as the first for me. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The attention to detail is definitely great in this- there's a side quest with someone who's upset, and her eye makeup has run. Only a tiny little thing, but this kind of thing is present throughout the whole game. I loved the different costume designs for the different tribes too.

 

Ubi and Mass Effect Andromeda makers should take note- more isn't better, and this has a wonderful hand crafted quality to it, especially with things like how alien the cauldrons are to the outside world. Each one is slightly different too. If Zubi had made this, there would be 15 bandit camps and like 10 cauldrons with each one just allowing you to unlock a single override.

 

This really should be the standard of quality for open world games going forward.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

56 minutes ago, Retroguy said:

The attention to detail is definitely great in this- there's a side quest with someone who's upset, and her eye makeup has run. Only a tiny little thing, but this kind of thing is present throughout the whole game. I loved the different costume designs for the different tribes too.

 

Ubi and Mass Effect Andromeda makers should take note- more isn't better, and this has a wonderful hand crafted quality to it, especially with things like how alien the cauldrons are to the outside world. Each one is slightly different too. If Zubi had made this, there would be 15 bandit camps and like 10 cauldrons with each one just allowing you to unlock a single override.

 

This really should be the standard of quality for open world games going forward.

 

Both this & Zelda would've got the attention of the developers of Far Cry 5, and Red Dead Redemption etc..., and that can only be a good thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just finished Deep Secrets of the Earth. Because I'm an idiot and went in past the "point of no return" at 11pm, and after two hours I finally got back to a point where i could save and go to bed. Except now I'm here writing about it. That was a truly excellent chapter though, and now the back story has gone up another level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Mr Do 71 said:

 

Both this & Zelda would've got the attention of the developers of Far Cry 5, and Red Dead Redemption etc..., and that can only be a good thing.

 

Far cry 5 can perhaps be designed appropriately - it's not been announced. It's far far too late in the process for RDR2, and Rockstar are going to go their own way anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/26/2017 at 23:40, Kos Mos said:

I've only just noticed that if you're in the mountains or a valley when you whistle etc there is an echo.

 

Mind blown at the attention to detail.

 

Felt this when running along a path and Aloy placed one step in a puddle, with appropriate audio to match. Little details that are inconsequential in isolation but make for a far more immersive world when considered as a whole.

 

Been saving for a 4K TV / PS4 Pro upgrade, this game is making me want to pull the trigger early...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hopelessly addicted to this right now.  I've just got to the big city - Meridian, Mandarin, Meriva - isn't that a Vauxhall?  Whatever it's called, it's gorgeous.

 

I did pick up a few too many side quests, which aren't really my thing, but I suppose it will give me something to keep an eye out for when I'm out exploring.  Really taking my time with the main quest lines, as I don't want this to end.

 

Wonderful stuff.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still on my way to Meridian... and I was surprised to see a Thunderjaw on the way. I assumed that high-level enemies wouldn't spawn until I was high-level too -- but nope, there are Thunderjaw zones on the map. I just have to shit my pants and avoid them! No way could I take on a Thunderjaw.

 

I'm still struggling with combat when it comes to the medium-sized and large machines. I'm sure I'm doing it wrong because my arrows hardly do any damage and each fight takes ages. The game seems built for stealth with all the tripcaster and trap stuff, but once you get the first strike on a larger machine, it goes apeshit and calls its friends over, and then you're in a clusterfuck. And I don't handle that clusterfuck very well -- I panic and can't remember which arrows do which damage to which bodyparts. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.