Jump to content
IGNORED

Nintendo Switch


deKay
 Share

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, deKay said:


They’re not even making a Switch Pro yet. It’s all conjecture.


Oh come on, you mean we don’t know Nintendo’s official game update/release strategy for an unannounced piece of hardware? Surely someone can tell us the answer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the new rumours are accurate then it's likely the chip is based on Orin which could be very interesting power wise. It's 8nm just like the ampere cards and is really cutting edge stuff. One rumour called it Orin S which means its a cut down version of the Orin chip used in cars. This would mean that it's very much a new gen chip. Way more advanced than the Tegra was when the switch launched. 

 It could very well sit around xbox one S or Ps4 power. More likely the former rather than the later though. DLSS though will be the real killer feature.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why would they use a machine learning chip for self-driving cars in the Switch? It's built on the Tegra platform, but it's not remotely appropriate as a console SoC. (What are they going to do with all the machine vision and ML training hardware?)

 

Edit - Don’t get me wrong, Orin is going to give you an idea what a modern mainline Tegra chip would look like and what they’re doing in low-power tensor hardware, but it’d be like having a recipe that calls for minced wagyu beef and throwing in an entire dressed wagyu quarter pounder, bun an all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

The inclusion of DLSS means the machine will punch way above its weight, right?

 

In an optical-illusiony sort of way, yes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know it isn’t how DLSS works but I always imagine it putting doge-shaped JPEG artefacts around everything as a side effect.

 

image.jpeg.287abd93af5b2e1e29fc0d1f909bccfc.jpeg


But yes, if true this will be a game changer for mobile video game hardware, or low-power game hardware in general. Now that is a niche where Switch is literally the only product but it is an interesting one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bloody Canada, been waiting for Mario Kart switch to drop in price for years now. It's still $80 new here and even second hand ones don't go lower than $65 (37 quid). That's insane right?, can't get what is essentially a 7 year old game for less than 37 quid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Capwn said:

Bloody Canada, been waiting for Mario Kart switch to drop in price for years now. It's still $80 new here and even second hand ones don't go lower than $65 (37 quid). That's insane right?, can't get what is essentially a 7 year old game for less than 37 quid.

 

Doesn't help you but it's £32 at Currys at the moment.

 

This isn't a new thing, Capwn. First party Nintendo games very rarely drop in price, and when they do it's usually when they launch a Players Choice range. Which they've not done on the Switch yet because all their first party games are still selling by the fuckton at the current price.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Alex W. said:

Why would they use a machine learning chip for self-driving cars in the Switch? It's built on the Tegra platform, but it's not remotely appropriate as a console SoC. (What are they going to do with all the machine vision and ML training hardware?)

 

Edit - Don’t get me wrong, Orin is going to give you an idea what a modern mainline Tegra chip would look like and what they’re doing in low-power tensor hardware, but it’d be like having a recipe that calls for minced wagyu beef and throwing in an entire dressed wagyu quarter pounder, bun an all.

Orin is ampere based so it makes sense to use. Remember tegra was actually used in cars (both Tegra 1 and 2) so basing it on Orin is probably a very good starting block for them. It would certainly save a lot of money than creating an entirely new chip from scratch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Switch Pro is to be in the mold of Pro/One X, would it be stupid to just make the dock have extra gubbins for higher resolution output? I know you have bandwidth issues then, because the USB-C port isn't just HDMI pass through to the dock. Or maybe you can make a newer SoC sip battery more efficiently than a Tegra while only outputting whatever the Switch's screen is. The latter feels like it has to be true, because otherwise all that oomph is wasted and not terrible efficient for people who stick to handheld play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, pulsemyne said:

Orin is ampere based so it makes sense to use. Remember tegra was actually used in cars (both Tegra 1 and 2) so basing it on Orin is probably a very good starting block for them. It would certainly save a lot of money than creating an entirely new chip from scratch.


It wouldn’t be from scratch, but I would assume they would start from the latest generation of the core Tegra hardware* and build upwards to a games console, rather than starting at Orin S shaving down. Orin S is a pretty heavily customised end product for machine vision and learning applications and most of what makes it Orin S would be wasted silicon and electricity here.

 

Maybe it’s just an issue of semantics.
 

*Which confusingly is also called Orin, versus the specific nVidia Drive Orin products like Orin S, which are built upon it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Orin S is apparently the low power version of Orin so maybe that is already factored into Orin S's design. One thing we do know is the switch pro will have a much faster CPU and more memory. The CPU cores in Orin are very good so it would be obvious to use them.

 I could be totally wrong of course but there was a linkedin from an Nvidia engineer that stated he was working on Orin and a game console so there is that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Orin S is just the single-SoC version of the same component isn’t it? Versus the two, four, etc SoC boards nVidia is already selling. It’s still part of the nVidia Drive range and loaded down with stuff that’s geared towards that application. As far as I know there isn’t a general-purpose SoC based on the Orin generation of Tegra.

 

The upshot of that is that Orin S certainly represents the upper bound of how much power an Orin-derived SoC for a games console would need, and it’s really low.

 

All that said, if they’re shipping this year I would’ve assumed something less bleeding edge. Xavier has been around for a bit and

it has tensor cores.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Alex W. said:

Orin S is just the single-SoC version of the same component isn’t it? Versus the two, four, etc SoC boards nVidia is already selling. It’s still part of the nVidia Drive range and loaded down with stuff that’s geared towards that application. As far as I know there isn’t a general-purpose SoC based on the Orin generation of Tegra.

 

The upshot of that is that Orin S certainly represents the upper bound of how much power an Orin-derived SoC for a games console would need, and it’s really low.

 

All that said, if they’re shipping this year I would’ve assumed something less bleeding edge. Xavier has been around for a bit and

it has tensor cores.

I'm not entirely sure. Nvidia haven't been totally clear on it either but now there is a rumour floating round that it might be a chip based on Lovelace which would be pretty amazing if true. That would be a 5nm part and utterly crazy. The person who leaked that info has a good reputation when it comes to Nvidia leaks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.