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The SNES Sony Playstation


gospvg
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1. Back in 1991, you had basically one option for plastic protoypes; lithography, or maybe SLS. The models were quite brittle and certainly didn't look like the finished product. They were used as a a visual model, rather than functional to any great extent. What we are looking at in the photo is a moulded part. Which means tooling, which mean a big outlay. You just wouldn't do it at that early stage

2. Why brand every thing as "sony and "playstation" and then leave the controller backs as "nintendo?"

3. Output at the back - Multi AV and composite and svideo and RF? That's a lot of unnecessary outputs. The position of the RF out socket looks odd too

4. This unit apparently requires 7.5VDC. The SNES needed 10VDC .So more functionality and needs to power a CD tray/drive, but needs less power?

5. Where's the memory cards go if you are playing a CD only title?

6. What does the button on the front left do?

7. The colour difference

Hey it may be real, but at the moment I doubt it.

Early prototypes of the PS3 had two HDMI ports and 3 network ports, so a few more additional outputs is hardly proof of fakery. The Panasonic Q is loaded with outs as well, as is the (contemporary) JVC X'Eye which had AV outputs as well as the multi-out, in fact I'd expect at least an L/R audio out on the back of this thing since it would've doubled as a CD player. As for the Nintendo branded controller, the back of the Panasonic Q controller is also a Nintendo part. Despite the front being branded Panasonic, the rear has the Nintendo logo and part number for a standard GameCube controller.

The colour difference (I'm guessing you mean the yellowing) is no proof of anything, other than it's old.

Remember, this is essentially a Super Nintendo, not a PlayStation so why would it have memory card ports? It's more likely that you'd use a standard RAM cart, like the Mega CD for games that needed saving if it didn't have battery backed memory.

Oh, what could've been.

419px-PS3_e3_2005_prototype_AV_out.jpg

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I'd like to imagine it runs a SuperFX2 version of the Tyrannosaurus demo.

:lol:

If this is real (and I hope that it is), I am curious as to what enhanced hardware it has over the regular Super Famicom. Presumably something, seeing as its rival the Mega CD had enhancements over a standard Mega Drive.

Edit: decider has a good point about the memory card slots, as the eventual actual Sony PlayStation was the first console to have such ports, with the Sega Saturn having a standard cartridge port for save memory (a holdover from when it was going to have a companion console without a CD-ROM drive called the Jupiter).

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:lol:

If this is real (and I hope that it is), I am curious as to what enhanced hardware it has over the regular Super Famicom. Presumably something, seeing as its rival the Mega CD had enhancements over a standard Mega Drive.

The technical document detailing the internals is here: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4cc2TZRufDtWERQV2FHZFhFaU1odEdTbWlTTHB1REJRNXdr/preview?pli=1

Essentially, more memory and a 32-bit "Super NES CD-ROM System Co-Processor".

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The technical document detailing the internals is here: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4cc2TZRufDtWERQV2FHZFhFaU1odEdTbWlTTHB1REJRNXdr/preview?pli=1

Essentially, more memory and a 32-bit "Super NES CD-ROM System Co-Processor".

Thanks!

PDF describes the co-processor chip as a 32-bit RISC CPU at 21.48Mhz. It came to mind that it might have been a variant on the Super FX chip, which was RISC and clocked at 21.4MHz, but then wasn't the Super FX 16-bit rather than 32-bit?

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Early prototypes of the PS3 had two HDMI ports and 3 network ports, so a few more additional outputs is hardly proof of fakery. The Panasonic Q is loaded with outs as well, as is the (contemporary) JVC X'Eye which had AV outputs as well as the multi-out, in fact I'd expect at least an L/R audio out on the back of this thing since it would've doubled as a CD player. As for the Nintendo branded controller, the back of the Panasonic Q controller is also a Nintendo part. Despite the front being branded Panasonic, the rear has the Nintendo logo and part number for a standard GameCube controller.

The colour difference (I'm guessing you mean the yellowing) is no proof of anything, other than it's old.

Remember, this is essentially a Super Nintendo, not a PlayStation so why would it have memory card ports? It's more likely that you'd use a standard RAM cart, like the Mega CD for games that needed saving if it didn't have battery backed memory.

Oh, what could've been.

419px-PS3_e3_2005_prototype_AV_out.jpg

But that's modelled with a SLA or 3D printer, its never made for use, its mock up.

Now if we are saying that the photos for the nintedo-station are a mock up and not a working model, that I can believe.

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3. Output at the back - Multi AV and composite and svideo and RF? That's a lot of unnecessary outputs. The position of the RF out socket looks odd too

The composite and RF outputs on the back are exactly how they were on the original model PS1 aren't they? I distinctly remember my mate's launch Playstation having that on the back. If I recall correctly, a single connector plugged into the composite video, L & R audio and RF outputs at once.

Edit:

post-19215-0-51033600-1436193543.jpg

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But that's modelled with a SLA or 3D printer, its never made for use, its mock up.

Now if we are saying that the photos for the nintedo-station are a mock up and not a working model, that I can believe.

What about the Sega Pluto that came out a few years ago? I don't know jack shit about plastics but that was an unreleased prototype that looked pretty damn close to final in terms of build quality. By all accounts the Playstation wasn't a million years away from release before the deal went sour, so it could very well be a final part.

segaplutoconsole.jpg

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That's actually quite a long way away from finished product standard, that's exactly what I would expect a mock up to look like


That's actually quite a long way away from finished product standard, that's exactly what I would expect a mock up to look like

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The Play Station supposedly had games in development for it so it wasn't at the hardware mockup stage when they decided to announce it to the world, you have to remember that the agreement to make it was signed back in 1988, and they announced it 3 years later. If the reported 200 units is correct, and Sony only have 4 of the buggers in their possession, where are the rest? landfill?

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1. I'm not going to pretend know anything about prototype models (especially any made in the 90s) but in gaming terms I know of some hardware that looked ready for consumer use (see bottom of post).

2. Presumably because the mould for a SNES controller already existed so there was no point getting a new one made at that stage. I would say a better question would be that if you were going to go to the effort of faking something by silk screening a logo onto a controller and putting a Sony branded connector on it, why would you take a photo of the underside of the controller with the Nintendo moulding when you didn't need to?

3. As pointed out the original PlayStation had that many outputs. Also, the US patent as at least that many outputs (I think there were more) shown.

4. I'm not going to pretend I know this. :P

5. Memory cards? In 1992?!

6. According to the Japanese patent I previously linked it's the power button.

7. As previously mentioned I get the colour difference being suspicious, but there are plenty of examples of other casing yellowing in a similar inconsistent way. Besides, if you were going to go to all that effort to fake something, surely you'd make a point of making it look more "believable" if you were going to yellow it to make it look older.

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5. Memory cards? In 1992?!

AES has a memory card slot and it was released in 1990. I would be surprised if they didn't appear before then as well.

Not saying it lacking a memory card slot means anything, but they existed.

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Bah. :P Okay, to put it another way, just because it had a CD drive doesn't necessarily mean it would have a means to save a file, especially as a lot of cartridge games didn't have that luxury. If it was planned it could have used internal memory or a RAM cartridge like the Mega CD.

The Japanese patent mentions the use of a memory cartridge (at least when translated through Google Translate) but I would assume that to mean a regular SNES cartridge.

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We are talking about a device being made to compete with the Mega CD - where's the memory card sockets on that? If you wanted more memory than the internal space allowed, you had to buy a special cartridge for it, so presumably this was meant to be a similar setup.

For what it's worth, I'm starting to think this may be real too. If it's not, it's a damn impressive fake.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The owner is supposed be posting an update about what's happening with it next week. He recorded a video earlier in the week to let people know he hadn't been robbed/was still alive/hadn't sold it/wasn't going to stick any old power cable into it.

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Somebody recently interviewed Reichart Von Wolfsheild, a man with a rather special set of skills who also happened to have developed both Return Fire for the 3DO and worked on the Play Station. He said this about his time working on it:

R.W: Our team was the original team brought in to work on the Play Station peripheral – when it was the original Play Station, where it was not a stand-alone machine.

It was an interfacing device for a CD player for the Super Nintendo.

Sony and Nintendo were going to cut a deal together, and we were doing the encryption technology, because I built that for many other companies – encryption and compression is where my specialty is.

I think I still have the manuals to that Play Station.

RGB: So the add-on, was it ready to go?

R.W: I wouldn’t say it was ready to go. There were two things happening at the same time.

Our company, Silent Software, that’s where we made most of our money on the back end, the drivers and stuff. So we worked on the 32X, basically, if there was some weird device out there we were probably doing something with it, because people would come to us and say ‘you know how to do this really fast‘. So a lot of the products we made were not consumer products. We worked on the back-end and got a percentage of it.

So the answer is, when I last saw it, it was down at the Sony building in Los Angeles. They were having hardware problems, which is funny for Sony because these were the guys actually building the CD players.

They couldn’t keep the bit rate high enough, they couldn’t play back simple video – they were actually playing with early CD video playback and we actually had that already working on the CDTV. But that’s because of Carl Sassenrath, he wrote that and it was just awesome.

It was amazing to stick an audio CD in and get real time video out of it. It was very impressive on the CDTV.

Sony did not have that so as I recall the two issues were, they weren’t using what we were doing, and, they said they were having political problems.

They were basically fighting with Nintendo at the time and Sony was making the big decision if they wanted to jump in to the video game business. It was an interesting time in history, and they had some really smart people over at Japan Sony. Impressive engineers. Every day we’d learn about some new little trick they’d come up with – that day! I was like wow! Like, the thing has stereo and now the thing has 3D sound and all sorts of other things, and they were trying to fit as much in and it was clear they were trying to shove more-and-more stuff and their fundamental goal of course, was to build something that eventually allowed them to get all the money.

All said and done at the end of the day all they cared about is that they’re making the money and Nintendo’s not.

The hardware was having a lot of problems and they realised the reason they were having problems was they were trying to match up to Nintendo, as opposed to just building it themselves. Put their own motherboard in and build it from the ground up. So this was very early on and pretty quickly they jumped from that to saying they’re going to build it themselves.

A bit of behind the scenes legend it would scem, considering the span of time and amount of shit he was involved in.

http://retrogamingblog.co.uk/2015/05/14/reichart-von-wolfsheild-3do-return-fire-and-the-industry/

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Interesting. Now that puts a different spin on the legend behind this because it makes it more likely that Nintendo realised what Sony were up to and at the first opportunity screwed them over to protect their interests. There's never been any official confirmation or accounting of what actually happened at the time.

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Read the excerpt I posted from Game Over, that is about as official as you are likely to get, unless another journalist can get access to the remaining players and they are willing to go into more detail about it. Nintendo did give Sony the rights to the CD format games of their own free will, Yamauchi was just a dick about getting out of the deal in the most dickish way possible. He always loved complete control and the cartridge format gave that to him, hence the N64 still being stuck with carts.

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  • 3 months later...
Yeah I was just reading similar on Engadget. So it plays Super NES games. Nice, not just some hollowed-out demo machine. Pity they couldn't get the CD drive to work, but then again what would it play? Doubt it'd play PlayStation games, because that was well after, but at the very least CDs (i.e. CD-Audio)? Would there be any prototype discs for this around anyway?
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No real surprised this is clearly a SNES CD development unit, there where a few finished or near finished games on it when it got canned, Secret of Mana was one such game but I doubt Square would be willing to hand over a build to test on it assuming they still have any left.

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  • 8 months later...

Hmm, interesting viewing, thanks.

 

Sounds like it was a pretty spartan expansion, and the world hasn't missed out on much. Putting the WRAM and the battery-backed save into the cartridge was an interesting choice - presumably if you filled up the save space, you'd have to buy another cart, which would be expensive due to the WRAM.

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