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Making Pizzas


Anne Summers
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I have tried various times but i if i put all of my toppings onto my dough then onto an oven tray it just cooks the pizza on the top and base/middle is uncooked. Tried on a high heat and low heat.

 

Am i better off pre cooking the base first then adding the sauce/toppings etc after it browns a bit?

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Hot oven with tray in the oven whilst pre heating. I tried with one of those circular metal pizza tray things with the holes in and it cooked a lot better but still not cooked in the middle.

 

How long should i preheat for? 30 minutes? an hour?

Does top or bottom shelf make a difference?

I have an electric fan assisted and a normal gas oven. The electric one cooks way faster in general. Which one is better to use?

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I use a pizza stone and twenty minutes in the oven at full temperature heats that up perfectly.

 

This might not be a heat issue, but a pizza issue. How think are your bases? Another thing to be careful with is toppings. Too much sauce and too heavy with the toppings can stop the base cooking properly. On the pizza making course I did the person leading it said soggy bases was most often due to putting too much sauce on the pizza.

 

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3 hours ago, jatpool said:

Hot oven with tray in the oven whilst pre heating. I tried with one of those circular metal pizza tray things with the holes in and it cooked a lot better but still not cooked in the middle.

 

How long should i preheat for? 30 minutes? an hour?

Does top or bottom shelf make a difference?

I have an electric fan assisted and a normal gas oven. The electric one cooks way faster in general. Which one is better to use?

 

How hot is your oven, you've said high heat and low heat but what do you actually mean? And beyond that, are you sure it's what the oven readout says if that's what you're going on? Mine is about 5 degrees out, so I tend to put it 5 or 10 hotter. For things like pizza I go really overboard, for example say a supermarket pizza says 180C then I'll cook it at 230C.

 

Other things to bear in mind are that your oven might tell you it has reached temp before it actually has (hence the preheat, but you'd have to know your oven) and on top of that even the briefest opening can easily drop the temperature enormously and it'll again take time to build up, but it might not be telling you that due to where the heat sensor is. Hot as hell on a good thick tray that holds heat well (otherwise, a stone) is as good as you'll manage if that's the cause of it.

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We have some of those heat conductive baking trays and don't preheat it. The pizza gets rolled and put on the tray (which has been dusted with semolina). Then we top it. Then it goes in the very top of a hot oven. Works for us. 

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Finally got around to following the pan-and-grill method on Pizza Pilgrim's site. 

 

I was actually surprised how easy it was. It does make a chewier kind of base but that's what I wanted, it was actually a lot more like the textures you get at Rossopomodoro which I quite like.

 

Dough was left 24 hours, seemed to work well, I'm surprised at how well the bread started rising as soon as it was on the pan.  I think getting the tomatoes right is going to be the challenge - just sourcing the right ones, and cooking them to the right amount. I'm really fucking hungover today so I couldn't be bothered to actually blend the cherry tin. Anyway, it's a pretty good pizza. 

 

If I was to make dough can you freeze it? I suppose the 24 hour thing is only a problem in terms of planning, it's not like the dough took a long time to make yesterday. But I just loved the way you can bash out 4 pizzas really quickly, so I'm definitely going to be doing this for friends.

pizza.jpg

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That looks pretty good. How was the crust?  It looks quite thick. I find stretching is the hardest part. 

 

You can freeze the dough,  and actually a few days cold rise in the fridge will improve it.  

 

Waitrose have San marzano tomatoes in at the moment, fresh ones,  which should be amazing for pizza.  

 

You can't generally get them in cans anywhere except amazon. 

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  • 2 months later...

I'm almost definitely going to get a pizza oven this summer. I can't decide on what though, either that one sdmilne posted or one of these:

 

http://blisteringwoodfiredovens.co.uk/the-ovens/80cm-woodfired-pizza-oven/

 

https://www.jamieoliverovens.com/product/dome80-leggero/

 

http://mobi-pizza-ovens.co.uk/garden-commercial-ovens/

 

Http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/brick-outdoor-wood-fired-Pizza-oven-100cm-x-100cm-Italian-model-/272535771516

 

how I decide I don't know! They're all tempting and there's no handy pizza oven expo I can go to and my googling for reviews has been fairly fruitless 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 19/06/2017 at 22:36, OnionNon said:

I've just ordered an Uuni bundle: https://www.thepizzaovenshop.com/product/uuni-3-pizza-oven-cover-pellet-bundle/

 

Need to find those ultimate pizza dough recipes now ^_^

 

It arrived today and I like it. 

 

Did a garlic bread pizza as a trial and it went well. Thin and crispy. 

 

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Next ones weren't quite as good. Probably because I added too many toppings and let the stone drop a bit too cold:

 

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I'd recommend them. 

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4 hours ago, Jonny5 said:

Yeah, I'm keen to hear how it is. I just watched a YouTube review and the guy kept burning his pizzas around the edge. I reckon it's one of those things that would take a while to get the hang of. 

 

On the burning I think the trick is to spin them around every 15 seconds so the crust cooks evenly. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I made some super simple deep pan pizzas with my son this weekend. Dead easy recipe from Serious Eats using their deep pan method. Virtually no kneading, no shaping. Made the dough Saturday, cooked Sunday. Stuck the flattened ball in the cake pan, let gravity do its thing, top and cook in a furiously hot oven for 15 mins. 

 

I'm well impressed considering all the faffing about I normally do to make pizzas at home. 

IMG_20170709_121008592_BURST001.jpeg

IMG_20170709_120942141.jpeg

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i googled uncooked vs cooked pizza sauce and now i'm 2 pages in to a 12 page thread on pizza sauce. It is some heavy shit.

 

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3735.0

 

Quote

As I mentioned in a recent post, Little Caesar's uses cold sauce preparation.  This is the preferred method of making sauces.  I was going to save this for a motherload post coming soon, but here it is now - straight from the research laboratory:

The two greatest concerns with cold sauce preparation are: 1) enzyme activation of pectin 2) full flavor extraction from seasonings.  Both of these problems can be be solved so simply, you're probably going to wonder why you haven't been doing this all along.  When preparing the sauce from a tomato paste base, add all the seasonings to the water portion in a microwave safe measuring cup.  Microwave the water-seasoning mixture at 30% power for 2 minutes.  There are a few things going on here that are very important.  First, the enzyme commonly found in Allium bulbs (e.g. onion, garlic) breaks down and no longer poses a threat of reacting with the pectin in tomato.  Second, microwaves (the energy, not the machine) superheat the cytoplasm causing the cell walls to rupture and release the alkaloids and resins (the flavor molecules you're after).  Believe it or not, a lot of academic research has gone into microwave-based alkaloid extractions.  This is a really good application of science developed in industries not related to food.  All one has to do next is allow the water-seasoning mixture to cool to room temperature before adding it to the paste.  Refrigerate immediately and for at least 6 hours before using.

I wanted to also make clear one of the main reasons cold sauce preparation is considered superior by a lot of restauranteurs.  Commercial tomato product processing plants evaporate tomato puree under a vacuum and temperatures no higher than 140 F.  Unless you have a vacuum distillation apparatus at home, you will never be able to achieve the same concentration as canned tomato paste without sacrificing some of the flavor.

 

He goes on to give his #2 sauce recipe:

 

Quote

I decided to finally release my #2 pizza sauce into the wild, and figured I would put it here since the instructions for handling the herbs and spices in the microwave are already in this thread.  First the ingredients, then a few notes, then a few instructions, and finally a few more notes.

Red November Sauce (#2)
 28 oz   11.3 NTSS (1.053 g/cc) tomato puree
 14 g   sucrose
   7 g   salt
3.5 g   herbs & spices (see below)
3.5 g   garlic powder
3.5 g   onion powder

herbs & spices (dried & crushed)
  earthy component
    4 vu oregano
    2 vu marjoram
    1 vu parsley
  sweet component
    4 vu basil
    2 vu tarragon
    1 vu fennel seed
  savory component
    2 vu rosemary
    2 vu thyme
  spicy component
    1 vu paprika
    1 vu black pepper

Notes:
   "vu" stands for volume unit since the measurements are expressed in ratios. If measured accurately and the herbs are crushed sufficiently, the total mass should be 3.5g when 1 vu = 1/8 tsp.
Instructions:
   Add the sucrose (table sugar) and salt to the sauce first and whisk.  In a separate sealable container measure and mix all the herbs and spices as well as the garlic and onion powders.  I recommend choosing a volume unit that allows you to match your quantity of puree exactly.  Trying to divide the herbs and spices after mixing will lead to uneven distribution.  Seal the container and shake well.  Pour the mixture into a microwaveable container such as a small Pyrex measuring cup.  Add just enough filtered water to the mixture so that it is completely moist, but not suspended in water.  Follow the microwave instructions in my two previous posts.  Add the herbs and spices to the puree.  Whisk and place in refrigerator to chill for at least 6 hours before using.
Notes:
   As you might be able to tell, the herbs and spices are deliberately matched according to a specific flavor profile.  There's a lot I could say about the reasoning behind the seasoning, as it took a long time to investigate each herb and spice in order to give it a profile component value, but it all still comes down to how each person thinks it tastes.  The more experienced on this site should already know this, but be sure the puree has no added substances (e.g. salt, citric acid, seasonings) if you buy it canned.  I hope I covered everything.

- red.november

 

 

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I tried the number 2 sauce above, it was pretty good. I'm not sure it was better than just using a tin of passata though, although is 'puree' something different in the USA? I used the tomato puree you get in a tube and it's far too thick so I had to thin it down with water.

 

The pizzas all turned out well mind, I've got a lot better are stretching them to a proper size now which is making a big difference. Also I'm more used to the oven. The first time I was a bit too sensible with the wood. I now pile it all in at the start and get a massive fire going. Works loads better :)

 

The key stages.

 

Fire!

 

596a541f3b09b_File_007(Large).thumb.jpeg.ec19ff92465e75fe93c3403a265a6c26.jpeg

 

Cooking! Got to keep turning it or you're in trouble..

 

596a541d00f1f_File_006(Large).thumb.jpeg.603fc69b4aca0296dc7739223e8c02bc.jpeg

 

Eating!

596a54168cf16_File_000(1)(Large).thumb.jpeg.424367db0d90b59606b67664775226b3.jpeg596a541885736_File_004(Large).thumb.jpeg.a841337a2ce1c7f6f6b7b6d288e886ea.jpeg

 

File_005 (Large).jpeg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Guys!


I've started making my own pizzas (night-and-day difference to the bought ones!) and I think I have it pretty much nailed, except for one thing.

 

When I roll out my dough, leave it for a bit, then put my toppings on, I basically am in capable of getting the whole thing onto my pizza stone without (best-case scenario) fucking up the shape of the pizza, or (usual case) ending up with the whole thing completely falling to bits in my hands. I can't roll the thing onto my pizza stone as that needs to be warming up in the oven beforehand.

 

So how do you guys do the transfer?

 

(sorry if this has already been answered)

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On 7/25/2017 at 15:31, mansizerooster said:

Guys!


I've started making my own pizzas (night-and-day difference to the bought ones!) and I think I have it pretty much nailed, except for one thing.

 

When I roll out my dough, leave it for a bit, then put my toppings on, I basically am in capable of getting the whole thing onto my pizza stone without (best-case scenario) fucking up the shape of the pizza, or (usual case) ending up with the whole thing completely falling to bits in my hands. I can't roll the thing onto my pizza stone as that needs to be warming up in the oven beforehand.

 

So how do you guys do the transfer?

 

(sorry if this has already been answered)

 

The free option is to heat your stone up, and pull it out the oven while you quickly add your base, sauce, toppings.  I've done this loads of times and it works fine, and the stone or oven doesn't seem to cool down enough.  (I actually pull out the whole oven shelf to make it easier to handle)

 

I've recently bought a £12 pizza peel from ebay for doing them on the barbeque and this will help loads too, as well as Gotters more pricey suggestion.

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Right, I FINALLY have my own pizza stone and am going to attempt to make my own pizzas tomorrow night, but want to get your opinions on a few things. Firstly, I was planning on making my dough with a bread make. Have any of you done this? Does it result in a lesser dough? 

 

Also, would it generally be a better idea to make the dough tonight and let it rest in the fridge overnight before I use it? Would this depend on the type of dough that I am using?

 

Thanks!

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3 hours ago, Andy_Why said:

 

 

Also, would it generally be a better idea to make the dough tonight and let it rest in the fridge overnight before I use it? Would this depend on the type of dough that I am using?

 

 

 

Yes.  The longer the dough sits, the more flavour it can develop.  Shouldn't matter if done in breadmaker.

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