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10 hours ago, Nick R said:

And it's been delayed again. At least this time there's a good reason.

 

No Time to Die, Fast and Furious 9, A Quiet Place 2, Mulan, Peter Rabbit 2... what next? :omg:

 

A good film? I jest. That said, I'm amazed Mulan is (well, was) tracking for a $90m opening. I thought people would be pretty sick of Disney's 'live action remake' bullshit by now, but apparently not. Also, from the trailers it looks dull as hell, whilst simultaneously spoilering all the important plot beats of the film.

 

I reckon lots of small to mid-budget films are going to die a death thanks to Covid-19, sadly, but Disney stand to make a fucking mint. If they release their big titles when the worst is over and people are feeling more hopeful and desperate to return to society, they'll make a killing. Hell, even New Mutants might turn a profit.

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2 hours ago, Treble said:

I reckon lots of small to mid-budget films are going to die a death thanks to Covid-19, sadly

 

Cinemas might struggle too. I don't know what their finances are like, but presumably the big Odeon and Cineworld chains can weather any downturn in attendance, but if it goes on for a while I think small independent cinemas will be in trouble.

 

Also, from that list of delayed movies I think No Time To Die will be a good film... though I seem to be one of the few here who think that!

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On 12/03/2020 at 23:26, Pug said:

Black Widow?


Guess - The only two of those films ever coming out are Mulan and Peter Rabbit 2.

 

the others either have loads of killing, unfortunate references to death in their title, or a too soon fictional dystopia.

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It's an interesting theory, but you'll be amazed how quickly will shake things off and forget. I agree some films will deffo never see a cinema release now, though.

 

November/Christmas will be packed with delayed releases, and some films will definitely change to straight-to-VOD

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1 hour ago, Treble said:

It's an interesting theory, but you'll be amazed how quickly will shake things off and forget.

 

Yeah; after 9/11 a few films were delayed, but within a few years later blockbusters were back to toppling skyscrapers and exploiting the imagery of clouds of ash and plumes of smoke on the skyline.

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On 14/03/2020 at 10:46, Nick R said:

 

Yeah; after 9/11 a few films were delayed, but within a few years later blockbusters were back to toppling skyscrapers and exploiting the imagery of clouds of ash and plumes of smoke on the skyline.

Famously the Bourne Identity had a new ending and beginning filmed due to the concerns about 9/11 and the film being seen as too “anti-American” but they ended up sticking with the original scenes and it ended up doing not too badly...

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On 14/03/2020 at 09:17, Treble said:

It's an interesting theory, but you'll be amazed how quickly will shake things off and forget. I agree some films will deffo never see a cinema release now, though.

 

November/Christmas will be packed with delayed releases, and some films will definitely change to straight-to-VOD


well, they’ve got to have something to show at the cinema in late 2021.

 

Perhaps... The New Mutants with the original cast.

 

before The Slightly Faded and Jaded Mutants in 2025.

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  • 1 month later...

Vulture article about what went on behind the scenes, even before the film was shot and its release repeatedly delayed:

 

https://www.vulture.com/2020/08/what-happened-to-the-new-mutants.html

 

Quote

The studio eventually brought in outside help, enlisting Fault in Our Stars writers Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber to give an uncredited punch-up to the characters. But according to sources who spoke to Vulture, the director remained at a creative “impasse” with Kinberg — the journeyman screenwriter-producer behind such franchise hits and misses as Deadpool, 2015’s Fantastic Four, and 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand — and Fox senior vice-president Jason Young. The cycle went like this: New versions of the script would come in, then Boone would revise them by replacing or eliminating some of the work that had been added. (Weber and Neustadter could not be reached through their representatives. Interview requests sent to Young via email and LinkedIn were not returned. A representative for Kinberg said the producer was not available because he is “on deadline.”)

 

By the winter of 2016, however, Fox officially got cold feet about the direction in which New Mutants was heading. Studio chairperson–chief executive Stacey Snider personally ordered the course correction. “Stacey didn’t want to do anymore Breakfast Club parts. It had to be horror. Straight horror,” a source tells Vulture. Another source adds, “They had zero faith the horror-[teen movie]-hybrid version would work in the marketplace.”

 

A roundup of uncredited screenwriters were again hauled in, this time to dial up Mutants’ scares. Among them: Chad Hayes and Carey W. Hayes (behind smash hits The Conjuring and its sequel), Joshua Zetumer (RoboCop), and Seth Grahame-Smith (writer of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and producer of It and 2019’s It: Chapter Two). But according to people close to Mutants, Boone continued to reject script changes as they came in: “Josh and Knate clarified the horror. Then [the Fox executives] bring in another outside writer. And then Josh went back again. There was this pattern where it would be Josh, then someone. Then Josh, then someone. Then Josh. That went back and forth.” (Attempts to reach Zetumer and Grahame-Smith through their representatives were unsuccessful. A representative for Chad and Carey Hayes said, “They aren’t credited on this film. I don’t think it’s imperative they are part of an article on this film.”)

 

 

Quote

The conflict came to a head in 2017, just before cameras were set to roll. Fox organized a roundtable script reading in New York to compel Boone to come around to their suggested “notes” to improve the film. In addition to Boone, Lee, and Young, the studio assembled six or seven of the uncredited writers who had been working on New Mutants up until that point as well as Scott Frank, a top-tier screenwriter behind Logan and 2013’s The Wolverine, who has functioned as a kind of secret X-Men whisperer, advising on many of the franchise’s films. According to a Vulture insider, the collected group delivered a roundelay of critiques, pointing out lapses in logic, deficits of humor, and underdeveloped characters. “Josh pushed back a little,” a source says. “People would be like, ‘This doesn’t make sense.’ And Josh would try to explain it. Enthusiasm is not an explanation.” (A rep for Frank declined to make him available for this article.)

 

And after a section explaining why reshoots never took place:

 

Quote

“I’ll tell you this: If there hadn’t been a merger, I’m sure we would’ve done reshoots the same way every movie does pickups,” Boone told EW.com. “We didn’t even do that, because by the time the merger was done and everything was settled, everybody’s older.”

 

At this point, according to three sources with knowledge of the project, Fox was hardly sanguine about New Mutants’ commerciality. Even with the world-beating success of the 2017 Stephen King horror adaptation It — which took in $700.4 million worldwide against a $35 million production budget — held up as a comparable work, significant doubt lingered about whether Mutants’ scary-meets-super tone would find an audience. In postproduction, a studio executive noted that a total do-over would not necessarily be a financial wipeout given the film’s relatively bargain budget. “You could throw the movie out, start over, and it would still be the least expensive X-Men movie so far,” the sources recall a high-ranking Fox executive claiming.

 

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1 hour ago, Gambit said:

Currently sitting at 29% on Rotten Tomatoes. Scott Mendelson calling it the worst X Men movie ever.

 

Mendelson? Bah, he probably just dislikes it because it's a movie made for grown-ups, not like the Saturday morning cartoons he enjoys. -_-

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7 minutes ago, Broker said:

I don’t know, even on his absolute worst day Fassbender Magneto is fucking amazing. It’s fully possible that this movie doesn’t even have one kind of good though poorly utilised thing in it. 

 

I love McAvoy & Fassbender, but I thought they too were awful in DP. The only good thing was the music score.

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In that article they reference a whole bunch of films as influences with a notable exception. If only I could think of a film that's about troubled teens locked up in an institution, developing powers and using them to fight a demonic entity.


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