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Said I'd post new ones going forward - this one was inspired by @stephen129 posting his chicken hayashi dinner in the 'take a pic of your dinner' thread. I'd never heard of the dish before and do love going off down a new research rabbit hole. Multiple YouTube videos and a bit of reading later settled on this recipe as shows all elements from scratch, and has a lot of views.

 

https://www.justonecookbook.com/hayashi-rice/

 

This is a time consuming recipe, spent this morning making the demi glace (reduced flavoured stock, good enough to drink on its own), whilst that was bubbling away I partially froze then sliced the beef to get the authentic looking thin slices (I bought a beef rib joint from supermarket, bit bigger than advised in recipe). It then all comes together quite quickly at the end with an interesting assortment of flavourings going in with the demi glace, and the meat and veg. 

 

I have to replace mushrooms as my other half despises them, but saw quite a few other recipes had carrots in. Then served with plain slightly sticky rice and some quick wok fried veg.

 

It's a really interesting taste and hard to describe. You know it's not a classic European tasting stew, but it isn't wholly Asian flavours either - it's a true delicious hybrid, always interesting to see how this sort of thing develops over a couple of days as it matures in the pot.

 

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  • 1 month later...

Been meaning to attempt lasagna for a while now, but was complicated by the amount of info out there and my other half being milk intolerant.

 

Solved the milk intolerance by subbing in Oatly in equal amount to milk - in its 'neat' béchamel form it does taste a bit different, but by the end I wouldn't have a clue of the swap out. I did try to hide the oat base a bit with some onion slices, nutmeg, bay & garlic powder in sauce whilst cooking.

 

I started with the Serious Eats lasagna method, using their classic bolognese sauce recipe, but then pepped it up quite a bit. I've added a few extra flavours to it with a couple of Oxo cubes, pancetta, garlic, pinch of sugar, italian herbs and some fresh sage and a glug of Worcestershire sauce. The bolognese method is slightly flawed in that its very hard to get browning on the meat in such large amounts (even in a giant pot), Bon Appetit make meat balls to get browning before mashing them back in at later point.

 

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/12/lasagna-bolognese-al-forno-recipe.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily_20200117_Friday_lasagna_SuggestedRecipesTemplate&utm_content=Daily_20200117_Friday_lasagna_SuggestedRecipesTemplate+CID_9f26d3d2d4eeb7ad5034c5d46e4c53bb&utm_source=Email campaign

 

Used Sainsbury fresh egg pasta lasagna sheets and followed the method to go for lots of thinner layers, criss-crossing over on construction to give better integrity at end. Finally went for a posh cheese wig on the top with grated Parm, Gruyere and cheddar - this isn't for the calorie conscious I suspect. Giant wok full of quick stir fried green veg to accompany. Left it to sit for a good 30 mins before attempting to cut so it could firm up, and worked a treat.

 

This does take an age to make, even cheating on the pasta - fortunately it does appear to be worth it on first tasting, I've never had a lasagna constructed with so many thinner layers like this, and its really tasty.

 

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I've almost given up finding a better curry than butter chicken, but every now and then get tempted to try.

 

The starting point for my inspiration this time was this dhal recipe, which looked a notch up from my pressure cooker one. The toasting of the lentils at the start and then the tempered ghee looked worth a punt - my initial tasting is that this is indeed a more complex tasting dish and I suspect will become my go to recipe.

 

https://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/mug-dhal-bhuna-recipe

 

New dhal meant it was worth taking a punt on a new curry too, and this one with its drier stickier sauce grabbed my attention - I went for way more chicken than advised as it just says '6 thighs', which vary a lot in size. Followed the rest of the recipe as written and it did start a bit 'wet' taking quite a bit of heat to get it down to the end thick consistency, fortunately with thigh they can take quite a bit of abuse. I suspect my non-stick pan doesn't help here either as they are notoriously poorer at getting heat into the dish. Initial taste test is very positive but will reserve judgement on spicy dishes until they've sat for day or two. 

 

https://www.greatbritishchefs.com/recipes/chicken-bhuna-recipe

 

Saffron rice is my default for curry so no messing with that.

 

This chicken bhuna now becomes my 60th main course variant according to my tracking spreadsheet.

 

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36 minutes ago, Kieran said:

Do you deseed the tomatoes or just chop them? I am definitely making that Bhuna later this week.


i de-skinned them in a bowl of boiling water then just chopped the whole tomato and put the whole lot in, may have explained my excess of moisture at start

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  • 4 weeks later...

Something a bit different here, fails my complete meal in a pot test but does fall into the batch cooking and freezing thing.

 

I never thought of burritos as a candidate for a batch cook, but this 'TinEats' recipe has a great idea to make a thick sauce that hold the whole thing together (she uses refried beans thinned out with water). You simply take one out as needed and reheat in the oven, even from frozen though suspect better to defrost first. 

 

In a rare turn of events I got loads more out of the recipe as written than she states, I got 8 on a claimed 5. Could be my wraps are smaller, or more likely my technique at filling & rolling them up is poor. 

 

As a warning this isn't a recipe to attempt if you end up wearing fajitas filling in your lap due to poor construction technique - I was trying to mimic the technique I see them use in my lunch burrito place, but couldn't get wrapped quite as tight.

 

For research purposes just had one for lunch and the thick sauce and cheese inside is brilliant as holds the whole thing together, also the cooking time slightly firms up the wrap so you don't end up with the contents all slopping out as you eat it. 

 

Great recipe and the concept is easily adapted now

 

https://www.recipetineats.com/chicken-burrito/

 

Screenshot_04_03_2020__12_35.thumb.jpg.55dc0f85923339ee4f476fd17e09e9d6.jpg

 

Screenshot_04_03_2020__12_36.thumb.jpg.95d6606bed2ede0172edb843cddc49f7.jpg

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  • 5 months later...

@Gotters are you still doing this? Do you have any new recipes? 

 

@bobontheway we have just moved premises at work and our MD has had a full kitchen built into the office. Only downside is that only he is allowed to use the kitchen... the idiot proceeded to deep fry hash browns in a pan full of oil. Only went and set the fire alarm off and smoked out the office. I mean, who deep fries food in an open plan office? 

 

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1 hour ago, Foxworth said:

@Gotters are you still doing this? Do you have any new recipes? 

 

Yeah still going strong - I made up a load in the weeks before full lockdown which stood us in great stead throughout the worst of things when deliveries or shops let us down with limited availability (they made very well received gifts too for family during the worst of things). Not being in offices meant we weren't going at them 5 days a week quite like before but was always great to have a big stock of them available.

 

Been sticking to tried and tested but now things normalising will look at a few I've had lined up for a while to make, we hit a point though where we had so much variety in terms of great recipes it became less important to look for new ones as often.

 

I will share any new variants here, I like looking back through this thread as this happened, its a nice record.

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  • 1 year later...

Thread bump - a new recipe I saw a week or so back inspired me to stop repeat cooking the classics I've previously detailed here.

 

It's a close call between a good curry or tex-mex for me as my favourite dishes in this form, and the blessed YouTube algorithm offered up a new take on a Japanese curry from scratch. These curry rice dishes are often made with a pre bought roux/spice block but this recipe does the lot from scratch, without the normal flour roux.

 

It's an intriguing recipe as has some good science on the onion caramelising stage to get them into a thick brown paste, and then adds in a banana, some cocoa powder, a new sauce to me called Chuno (a hybrid of Worcester & Tonkatsu). Finally you make up a 20 spice mix which I could accommodate from stores apart from dried mandarin peel. A bit of online shopping and a week later I was ready to go.

 

The cook is pretty straightforward and worked a charm, filling the house with heady smells as soon as the ginger/garlic/onion got caramelising. Nice chunky veg cut in that interesting Japanese diamond like style (so easy, just quarter turn the carrots on each slice). My only tweaks were using 1kg of skinless chicken thigh (don't see point in using skin when its sat in liquid) and I lobbed in some edamame as had them in the freezer.

 

Taste wise its brilliant, very distinct as a Japanese style curry but with bags of depth and flavour, the banana & cocoa don't come thru as noticeable at all but everything adds to a harmonious rounded flavour, it's probably better than the original Japanese curry recipe I had which I cooked A LOT, that was pretty authentic but used some different technique & ingredients (like dash stock) for the flavour. Think my only tweak if I made again would be looking to swap out the cayenne as the heat source in the curry powder and maybe trying something rounder like Kashmiri chilli, I want that heat but the cayenne does add it in a certain way which I think can be improved on.

 

Here is the link to the recipe, if tempted to try it I'd recommend watching the YouTube video a couple of times to get the first stage technique down as it's important to building that powerful flavour base.

 

https://norecipes.com/japanese-curry-recipe-from-scratch/

 

Hard to make a curry look nice so here is some pics of brown meat & veg in gravy.

 

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  • 1 year later...

Since we now have a double sized fridge and freezer, were going to start doing this. Probably starting with simple something-and-rice type stuff and going from there.

 

Can anyone recommend decent containers? The link early on in the thread is dead. They'll be going to work, so will need to close properly.

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Containers are a bit of a variable thing and depend on what exactly you want to do with them.

 

At the top end is definitely glass with clickable lids, great for everything and when you microwave them you don't get that discoloured speckle plastic left in the pot around the food line, plus the click lock lids make them great even with soup if you got to transport them. Downside is weight and much easier to break. 

 

I use these at home for soup all the time, lids are good but I wouldn't chuck one in a bag where it may not be level all the time, plus they do show sign of that microwave discolouration and break up after a few uses. I'd trust the lid with some rice or non liquid food though

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B09DLD9T5M/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Sistema do some slightly better/pricier ones but they are still plastic and not perfect over time if you heat certain high stain foods (curry or tomato based stuff)

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I still do this stuff all the time, so many of these recipes in this thread remain in use.

 

Only last week filled up a large space in the freezer with 2 portioned up giant lasagnas - seems expensive when you do it and there are £40 of ingredients on the shopping list but you then end up with 18 squares of delicious deep lasagna, you'd be hard pressed to buy a crap one in a supermarket for c£2 a portion. 

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2 hours ago, Gotters said:

I still do this stuff all the time, so many of these recipes in this thread remain in use.

 

Only last week filled up a large space in the freezer with 2 portioned up giant lasagnas - seems expensive when you do it and there are £40 of ingredients on the shopping list but you then end up with 18 squares of delicious deep lasagna, you'd be hard pressed to buy a crap one in a supermarket for c£2 a portion. 

This is the thing I'm really interested in. I think nothing of buying stuff like Bol pots for £2.50, so anything under that (Inc cooking coats) is worth the effort.

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We have the sistema ones and they are good, couple of years later and they look a bit battered but still working fine. Also have the glass Ikea ones with lids (and plastic too) and they are great with pros and cons as @Gottersstates…

 

Wagamama delivery containers are great too - had many a ramen just to get the pot ;) 

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7 hours ago, Shimmyhill said:

Wagamama delivery containers are great too - had many a ramen just to get the pot ;) 

Top Tip, they also make great spice mixing bowls for when you have to use loads of turmeric and don’t want it to stain your bowls. I use them whenever I’m making a job lot of curry powder mix. 

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  • 1 month later...

stupid question time. I don't food prep as such but as a singleton I often make enough for two and freeze one. I always pop it in fridge about 30 mins after cooking then put it in freezer once completely cold.

 

I made a lovely spanish chorizo chicken chickpea potato thing last night I ladled out a "clicky box" for a 2nd portion and popped it in fridge 30 mins after cooking. However I forgot to pop it in freezer but remembered this morning. Food safety wise will that be ok? or was it in fridge too long before freezing.

 

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I'm veggie, so the food is generally safer, but I cook big pots of stew or chilli, leave them on the hob to cool overnight, stick them in the fridge in the morning, leave them for a couple of days, and then might decide to freeze some. It's always been fine. If I was using meat I'd get it in the fridge ASAP, but honestly once it's in there it's good for days, and if you freeze it while it's good it basically goes into stasis.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 10/10/2022 at 11:54, Gotters said:

I use these at home for soup all the time, lids are good but I wouldn't chuck one in a bag where it may not be level all the time, plus they do show sign of that microwave discolouration and break up after a few uses. I'd trust the lid with some rice or non liquid food though

 

https://smile.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B09DLD9T5M/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I bought some of the larger ones of these to freeze soup in.  The first two soups I got out of the freezer were both pumpkin, pepper and coriander, which both came out fine.  The next out was carrot and coriander but it looked very strange once defrosted.  It separated into very weak liquid and loads of lumps, looked like vomit actually.  I tried to hand whisk it, but it just looked wrong so I chucked it.  Now I've got the same problem with the mushroom soup I got out yesterday.  What am I doing wrong?

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1 hour ago, Stejay said:

 

I bought some of the larger ones of these to freeze soup in.  The first two soups I got out of the freezer were both pumpkin, pepper and coriander, which both came out fine.  The next out was carrot and coriander but it looked very strange once defrosted.  It separated into very weak liquid and loads of lumps, looked like vomit actually.  I tried to hand whisk it, but it just looked wrong so I chucked it.  Now I've got the same problem with the mushroom soup I got out yesterday.  What am I doing wrong?

 

when you make a blended soup it will always settle out a bit on the defrost with the solids dropping and the water sitting at the top, it's why shops put things like stabilisers or emulsifiers in and more natural products say 'shake before use'

 

even peanut butter sat in a jar will see the solids and oil separate.

 

quick warm and stir and it'll all re-integrate no problems, I tend to find less point stirring when it's cold, needs to warm a bit to mix up better.

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