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Female-fronted alt/indie rock

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35 minutes ago, Nick R said:

 

Are Sleater-Kinney too obvious to be worth mentioning so far? :quote:

1

I thought they had been! My brain must have just inserted them into the list.

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I really quite like the new Screaming Females album.

 

Marmosets are excellent, this is their first album as I've already posted their new one in the Best New Music 2018 thread

 

 

And yes I know they're not Indie, but no mention of The Distillers (or any Brody Dalle?)

 

Or The Donna's for that matter?

 

Quite like Tonight Alive

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This song is so incredibly sexy. I’m absolutely in love with her vocals and it makes seven minutes seem like moments. Just great. 

 

 

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On 01/03/2018 at 15:22, Andy_Why said:

 

Does Honeyblood fit with the sort of thing you're looking for? They have some great tunes!

 

A couple of years ago I saw them on the same night at the same tiny venue as these:

 

 

Both were amazing and I've been to every gig both bands have played anywhere near me ever since.

 

You can never have too much honey!

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Right so I lacked links last time

 

So Julie Plug, obscure San Fran band I adore, the made one record that basically knocked off Belly circa King

 

 

And another where they mimicked The Sundays

 

 

 

And then of course we have Chvrches

 

 

How about some Aimee Mann

 

Or The Both

 

 

I mentioned Alex winston didn’t I?

 

 

Dresden Dolls

 

 

And of course subsequently Amanda fucking Palmer (Neil Gaiman’s wife no less)

 

 

 Of men and monsters?

 

The Pierces

 

And staying with the heavy Fleetwood Mac inspired vibe there’s Haim

 

 

And on the same theme Hole

 

 

How about Sting’s daughter?

 

 

And more female electronica the wonderful Ladytron

 

 

Or ernest female fronted guitar pop Heather Nova

 

 

I could go on but I’ll stop for now...

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On 3 March 2018 at 22:24, Sureshot said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These threads are nice to get introduced to stuff you haven't heard before, but given this is my genre of choice I'm shocked I've never come across The Sounds before.

 

Why did no one tell me that there was a Blondie for the millennial years?

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Has no-one mentioned The Cardigans yet? I love their early Indie Pop period (especially First Band on the Moon), but I only recently picked up Long Gone Before Daylight, and I think it's a bit of a masterpiece.

 

Also, St Vincent, whilst a solo artist, fronts her live band so it counts!

 

 

 

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Yep, Long Gone Before daylight is indeed a masterpiece, and if you like that you should also check out Nina's two albums with A Camp (terrible band name, great music).

 

 

And this just popped up on my iTunes shuffle and made me wonder why neither I nor anybody else had mentioned them yet (unless I missed it):

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Darren said:

And this just popped up on my iTunes shuffle and made me wonder why neither I nor anybody else had mentioned them yet (unless I missed it):

 

Nah, but I was going to mention them - I just picked up one of their CDs recently.

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55 minutes ago, Gorf King said:

Hmm, there's something not quite right here. Let's see.

 

On 01/03/2018 at 15:22, smac said:

Nah, oldies would be Siouxsie, X-ray Specs, Penetration, the Slits, the Pretenders and the like.

 

:quote:

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Oi fink it was maybe the music that was missing. Seems to me all those late 70s/early 80s bands provided the template for a lot of more recent stuff from the 90s on, which - like a lot of popular music - seems mostly to be trading on the archetypes set up by past originals. They usually don't seem to have the imagination or potency that the originals possessed, though. That sense of pushing a boundary. Or at least they don't to me. Dunno, might not be what the OP wanted anyway.

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14 hours ago, Gorf King said:

Oi fink it was maybe the music that was missing. Seems to me all those late 70s/early 80s bands provided the template for a lot of more recent stuff from the 90s on, which - like a lot of popular music - seems mostly to be trading on the archetypes set up by past originals. They usually don't seem to have the imagination or potency that the originals possessed, though. That sense of pushing a boundary. Or at least they don't to me. Dunno, might not be what the OP wanted anyway.

 

Yeah, but everyone who's old (me included) says that!  All musicians are standing on the shoulders of giants, for stuff that came out in the 70s and 80s they would have been influenced by blues and music from the 50s/60s.

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A discussion for another thread probably, but while there's always some truth in that as a general statement, I don't think it should be allowed to obscure appreciation of the difference between this era and past ones of popular music. It has, I think, lost its cultural impact and a great deal of its originality and excitement over the past two-three decades - and that's especially true of genres (ugh) that don't really 'stand on the shoulders of giants' to move anything forward. They just ape or adopt a form or attitude and don't seem to do a lot with it, or seem to want to.

 

I'm not even having a go at the music, necessarily - it might even be stuff I like. One of the last actual 'movements' that had real cultural impact was hip hop, and as wide a base as that covers it's never been something I particularly got into. I'd prefer to listen to a lot of stuff in this thread, to be honest - I just don't enjoy the actual form of a lot of hip hop that much, generally speaking. But it's really obvious that it had an actual culture, and genuinely shook things up, in a way that used to happen with every movement every few years, at least every decade, in popular music. I realise that's partly because of the fractured, some might say diverse, nature of popular music these days, but part of what was exciting was the diversification when it happened. And that seems to be over now, that actually process that ended up with this endgame. The pushing of boundaries.

 

Basically, as an old fart I should be all like, 'arrrgh what's this noise, this isn't real music you can't even hear the lyrics!' or something when a new thing comes along and breaks the mould. That's how this stereotypical old fogey should react to the shock of the new. I shouldn't be able to relate to it. Not be nonplussed by how curiously middle-aged and safe it all sounds. Not be thinking 'yeah, it's ok but it's a bit bland and obvious.'

 

In short, I'm not hating on it. I'm lamenting that I should hate it a lot more than I do.

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4 minutes ago, Gorf King said:

Basically, as an old fart I should be all like, 'arrrgh what's this noise, this isn't real music you can't even hear the lyrics!' or something when a new thing comes along and breaks the mould. That's how this stereotypical old fogey should react to the shock of the new.

 

I've never really understood why there's this consensus that every generation of pop music should reject the one that came before, and why it's seen as so important for the new generation to do things (whether in the music, or in their on-stage/off-stage antics) that confuse and outrage their parents.

 

Admittedly I was an unusually un-rebellious teenager, and I didn't really start getting into music until just before I went to uni, but my attitude was always: my mum's heard a lot more music than me, and I like some of what I've heard her playing, so what's the point of rejecting that experience?

 

The way your standard BBC music documentary tells the story, 20th century music history consists of nothing else but moments that alarmed the parents from the previous generation: vandalism when Rock Around the Clock was played in Blackboard Jungle, John Lennon being Bigger Than Jesus, the Rolling Stones at Altamont, the Sex Pistols swearing on live TV, Boy George on Top of the Pops, backmasked lyrics in hair metal, "Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics", raves being shut down by the police. After that, I struggle to think of anything more recent that's made it into that narrative - Marilyn Manson being linked to Columbine, or Eminem holding a chainsaw, maybe?

 

Almost all those examples are more about performance than things in the music itself. But if there's one thing that those talking heads inevitably bring up more than anything else when telling that story, it's this: "Punk was a reaction against prog and glam." You picked your side and you defended it to the death. That's the event that seems to have culturally embedded itself as the way things ought to be between generations of music fans.

 

Maybe it's because the musicians who once shocked teenagers' parents are now grandparents with knighthoods and bus passes, wearing cardigans and advertising butter, so no-one's worried about the prospect of music bringing about the downfall of society. Maybe it's because pop music used to be seen as is a young person's fad to be grown out of, whereas now the expectation is that a band will stay together until its members are in their sixties (or at least reunite when they're that age). Maybe it's because the entirety of recorded music history is now so easily accessible that young music fans can bond together as mutual fans of old stuff, instead of having to form active subcultures.

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