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On 27/06/2021 at 14:40, Major Britten said:

Been playing through Gran Turismo 3 and am currently at 20% completion. Playing it through with a Logitech Driving Force wheel and the difference compared to just a pad is huge, I'm pretty much re-learning the game from scratch as this the first time really using a steering wheel peripheral for any console. It will be strange playing GT7 with a pad after getting used to a wheel, but there's no way I can afford $500 to buy a decent wheel for the current gen machines.   

 

Related I came into this thread to say I finally got round to using Asetto Corsa and my wheel to drive F1 cars in VR.

 

Fucking hell that's good.

 

 

 

This, but 20 more F1 cars on the track in real liveries.

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For the past week Ive been playing Need for Speed Hot Pursuit 2 for the first time on the PS2. The first NFS game I had played was Shift and the Criterion HP on the 360 so I had no experience with any of the games previous to that. Ive heard from a lot of people that this was the best NFS on the PS2 so I had high hopes for this and was excited to finally try it out.
 

Its a strange one as graphically its not so good, especially compared to stuff like GT, the burnout sequels or Ridge and the soundtrack gets repetitive very fast as theres only like 4 different tracks in the game. But gameplay wise its a lot of fun and the handling is good with the cars each handling differently and with a decent amount of weight. Its also fun trying to find the various shortcuts in the tracks. Not had a chance to play with a wheel just yet but Ive not had any problems with using the pad so far.
 

Overall I think the game is pretty basic in terms of features and variety but its a fun little arcade style racer and it reminds me of the Forza Horizon games in a lot of ways. 

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I’m currently a couple of hours into Legend of Xanadu 2 on the PC Engine.

 

It’s another Falcom game and has a similar play style to Ys. As soon as I knew this and saw the graphics, I was in like Flynn!

 

It’s a mix of overhead with a bump/auto attack mechanic and a 2d platform fight for the bosses, and it looks gorgeous!
 

I really do like Falcom’s idea of more straight forward fighting when you’re generally adventuring and then a more strategic boss fights.

 

Unfortunately it’s JPN only, which is a real shame. I have limited JPN knowledge so I get a bit of a gist but that’s about it.
 

It has an unusual mechanic on levelling weapons/armour the more you use them. I guess it’s like familiarity. This means it’s not just a case of buying a new weapon and equipping it, you have to fight to get the levels up.

 

This lead to a point where I’d got to the 2nd boss, it had 625 points of health and I was literally doing 1 damage even though I had the best sword I could access. I had to go off and grind to raise to the level of the sword on once I did I started taking chunks off the boss.
 

Falcom really need to bring this and it’s predecessor out as a collection.

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Zelda: A Link To The Past

 

I've never played this, so thought I'd give it a go. I'm currently about 3 hours in and have got the first pendant. 

 

I can't say I'm enjoying it that much. I found the first proper dungeon after I'd rescued the princess (that's Zelda, right?) to be quite frustrating then the boss fight was just a question of standing in the corner and throwing my boomerang repeatedly. I'm even finding the overland navigation a bit of a chore, mostly due to the respawning enemies.

 

Going to stick at it a while longer and see if it clicks.

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Northstar by Gremlin (ZX Spectrum) for the Retroleague

 

Infuriating platform game for two reasons.

 

1. Your main weapon is an extending claw, upgrades take ages to find and are lost on death

2. INERTIA! Too easy to either kill your forward momentum and make a smaller jump than intended, or skid straight into an approaching enemy.

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17 hours ago, ScouserInExile said:

Zelda: A Link To The Past

 

I've never played this, so thought I'd give it a go. I'm currently about 3 hours in and have got the first pendant. 

 

I can't say I'm enjoying it that much. I found the first proper dungeon after I'd rescued the princess (that's Zelda, right?) to be quite frustrating then the boss fight was just a question of standing in the corner and throwing my boomerang repeatedly. I'm even finding the overland navigation a bit of a chore, mostly due to the respawning enemies.

 

Going to stick at it a while longer and see if it clicks.

Not sure if I'm going to stick at this. I know it's probably the most sacred of sacred cows, but I'm just finding it really frustrating to play and have already resorted so save state scumming and watching play through videos. Both of which wouldn't have been an option back in the day. 

 

Speaking of which - this is the first time I've played it, so have no nostalgia for it and am looking at it through the eyes of a modern gamer, so I'm probably judging it a bit too harshly. But:

Graphically it's amazing. If this was a 2D game produced now, you'd be impressed by the graphics, they're that good. 

Not a fan of the music, but it suits the game and it does the job. Sound effects are as good as the graphics, though. 

Gameplay wise I think the difficulty really lets it down. Judging by the play through videos I've seen, I'm not that far in and I'm finding it teeth grindingly difficult to progress. While an rpg should encourage you to explore and experiment, there's a distinct lack of signposting, some rng issues, a mechanism or two not explained and, worst of all, some real trail and error that will send you a long way back on the error parts. 

 

I can see that there's a good game in there, but I just don't think I'm willing to persevere to get to it. 

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Nostalgia is a powerful thing, but I don't think that's why you don't like it. I mean, I've gone back and played a load of PCE, MD and SNES games I never had when I was a kid and loved them.

 

Do you play other older games and feel the same?

 

Games were definitely trickier then, I'll grant you that. I often resort to FAQs!

 

 

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On 21/07/2021 at 14:13, Major Britten said:

For the past week Ive been playing Need for Speed Hot Pursuit 2 for the first time on the PS2. The first NFS game I had played was Shift and the Criterion HP on the 360 so I had no experience with any of the games previous to that. Ive heard from a lot of people that this was the best NFS on the PS2 so I had high hopes for this and was excited to finally try it out.
 

Its a strange one as graphically its not so good, especially compared to stuff like GT, the burnout sequels or Ridge and the soundtrack gets repetitive very fast as theres only like 4 different tracks in the game. But gameplay wise its a lot of fun and the handling is good with the cars each handling differently and with a decent amount of weight. Its also fun trying to find the various shortcuts in the tracks. Not had a chance to play with a wheel just yet but Ive not had any problems with using the pad so far.
 

Overall I think the game is pretty basic in terms of features and variety but its a fun little arcade style racer and it reminds me of the Forza Horizon games in a lot of ways. 

I like this game but it does a lot wrong. The laps often feel sooooo long and the overall track design isn't great. But it handles well and does look okay, not as polishes as other games but lots going on. 

 

Good choice of arcade and SIM style handling but the game seems to uncomfortably straddle both types of game. 

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1 hour ago, ScouserInExile said:

Not sure if I'm going to stick at this. I know it's probably the most sacred of sacred cows, but I'm just finding it really frustrating to play and have already resorted so save state scumming and watching play through videos. Both of which wouldn't have been an option back in the day. 

 

Speaking of which - this is the first time I've played it, so have no nostalgia for it and am looking at it through the eyes of a modern gamer, so I'm probably judging it a bit too harshly. But:

Graphically it's amazing. If this was a 2D game produced now, you'd be impressed by the graphics, they're that good. 

Not a fan of the music, but it suits the game and it does the job. Sound effects are as good as the graphics, though. 

Gameplay wise I think the difficulty really lets it down. Judging by the play through videos I've seen, I'm not that far in and I'm finding it teeth grindingly difficult to progress. While an rpg should encourage you to explore and experiment, there's a distinct lack of signposting, some rng issues, a mechanism or two not explained and, worst of all, some real trail and error that will send you a long way back on the error parts. 

 

I can see that there's a good game in there, but I just don't think I'm willing to persevere to get to it. 

A Link to the Past was considered easy back in the day!

 

Do you have a manual or anything? Explain the items etc. 

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I’ve never got on with A Link To The Past. My first Zelda was Link’s Awakening, and going from its grid-based map to ALTTPs imprecise Mode 7 (I think? Memory rusty) map just made me feel like I had no idea where I was or where I should be going.

 

Never had the same problem with 3D Zeldas, or Minish Cap. 

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18 minutes ago, nakamura said:

I like this game but it does a lot wrong. The laps often feel sooooo long and the overall track design isn't great. But it handles well and does look okay, not as polishes as other games but lots going on. 

 

Good choice of arcade and SIM style handling but the game seems to uncomfortably straddle both types of game. 

Yeah I’ve been playing some more and Im about halfway through the championship mode and its really becoming a bit of a slog. In the later half each tournament has four races with each race taking 10-12 minutes to finish. Add the rubber-banding A.I. Which  is constantly behind you and will overtake you and win if you make a single mistake and it’s starting to be less fun to play.

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13 minutes ago, Major Britten said:

Yeah I’ve been playing some more and Im about halfway through the championship mode and its really becoming a bit of a slog. In the later half each tournament has four races with each race taking 10-12 minutes to finish. Add the rubber-banding A.I. Which  is constantly behind you and will overtake you and win if you make a single mistake and it’s starting to be less fun to play.

Yes. It's actually a better game in the slower cars. The faster ones gifh the frame rate issues, which aren't bad but not amazing. Also, like you said, the rubber banding is quite aggressive. 

 

It's a solid game, and the PS2 version was the best but it's definitely a bit overrated. 7/10 for the era. 

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Sat on my bed and have just completed Ridge Racer for the first time in over 20 years. The first one on PS1. I absolutely rinsed it when I got my PS1 in 94/95. Like compulsively played it, my love of games today definitely has a good bit to do with OG RR. I've fired it up plenty over the years, did a few races here and there, mainly to test it out on my PS2, PS3 and Vita etc. But this morning with my first coffee of the day I loaded it up in Duckstation on my phone. I'm using an S20 Ultra and Razer Kishi.

 

Anyway, I cleared Galaxian for the first time since my PS1 save. I know it's easy but as I've only been pissing about in the past I never really bothered to try. This morning I did it first go. This gave me a nice little buzz and so I deemed it necessary to play the game through properly. Glad I did because it's been a great start to my Saturday. Devil beat etc, all to Rare Hero. It's still my favourite RR. Ridge Racer Revolution next.

 

I have all the PS1 Ridge games on my Vita, have enjoyed a dabble with them in the past but using Duckstation on my phone with its large screen seems miles better, the widescreen hack works great, doesn't seem to compromise the aspect ratio too much, if at all and the fixes for PS1 geometry do a great job at sprucing up the gfx, as well as a 720p resolution.

 

Great start to the day.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Colonel Panic said:

Nostalgia is a powerful thing, but I don't think that's why you don't like it. I mean, I've gone back and played a load of PCE, MD and SNES games I never had when I was a kid and loved them.

 

Do you play other older games and feel the same?

 

Games were definitely trickier then, I'll grant you that. I often resort to FAQs!

 

 

I've played through a couple of 8 and 16 bit things in the last year or so - Stunt Car Racer  and Turrican on C64, which I never got anywhere on back in the day and found quite easy now. And Rock N Roll Racing, Zombies (Ate My Neighbours), Final Fight 2 and 3 on SNES and Speedball 2 on MD. The only ones of these I didn't play first time around were the Final Fight games and, with the ones I did play, I found them much easier this time around that I did in the 90s.

 

I've considered starting a "Were game harder back then?" thread a couple of times. They definitely were.

 

38 minutes ago, nakamura said:

A Link to the Past was considered easy back in the day!

 

Do you have a manual or anything? Explain the items etc. 

No manual, playing a ROM. I tended to be cart only a lot of the time with SNES, since there was a game shop that sold second hand games and did rentals about 5 minutes from house back then. I really wanted to try playing this with no guide and no state saves. That didn't last long.

 

ALTTP just has a few annoyances like enemies everywhere in the overland bits and plenty of instances where you can't avoid getting hit. 

 

I've reached a boss that keeps knocking me off the platform it's on and, after an hour of trying to kill it, I assumed I was doing something wrong. I found a video and discovered I was doing it right and it's just that it's health resets when you get knocked off. If was playing back when I couldn't find a solution, I would have given up at this point. It was trial and error to find where to hit it in the first place and I spent a good bit of time feeling like I'd missed something because it wasn't dying and there wasn't really anything that pointed to what was going on.

 

I'm not saying it's a bad game, by the way. Far from it, I can see the good in it and can definitely see why people like it. I just find it has a few issues that I find frustrating and can't tolerate. Saying that, I'm considering giving it another go to see if I can get any further, not least because the video I looked up was something like part 4 of 20, so I've clearly barely scratched the surface.

 

Whether I continue or not, I'm glad I've given it a go. the Zelda series is one I've never touched but always felt like I should. I might give the N64 or Wii iteration a go, just in case, but I now kinda feel like I've given it a go and can move on.

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On 24/07/2021 at 08:23, ScouserInExile said:

Not sure if I'm going to stick at this. I know it's probably the most sacred of sacred cows, but I'm just finding it really frustrating to play and have already resorted so save state scumming and watching play through videos. Both of which wouldn't have been an option back in the day. 

 

Speaking of which - this is the first time I've played it, so have no nostalgia for it and am looking at it through the eyes of a modern gamer, so I'm probably judging it a bit too harshly. But:

Graphically it's amazing. If this was a 2D game produced now, you'd be impressed by the graphics, they're that good. 

Not a fan of the music, but it suits the game and it does the job. Sound effects are as good as the graphics, though. 

Gameplay wise I think the difficulty really lets it down. Judging by the play through videos I've seen, I'm not that far in and I'm finding it teeth grindingly difficult to progress. While an rpg should encourage you to explore and experiment, there's a distinct lack of signposting, some rng issues, a mechanism or two not explained and, worst of all, some real trail and error that will send you a long way back on the error parts. 

 

I can see that there's a good game in there, but I just don't think I'm willing to persevere to get to it. 

I'm sorta replying this, never completed it first time, but I loved it. Not so sure now. Though I think I only like arcade racers these days. I tried the first Zelda recently (nes), Jesus Christ the difficulty is insane.

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I did a play through of NES Zelda last year. It's mad hard until you start getting some hearts and items. Even then, trying to find some of the dungeons WITHOUT and FAQ. Possible with the kind of free time you had as a kid but now? NOPE!

 

I still loved it though!

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I loved A Link to the Past back in the day, but I think I only got through it due to tips in a magazine and the in-game map is really unhelpful. Even back then I was never a fan of the somewhat floaty hit-detection, either, and that put me off when I tried replaying it a few years ago.

 

Anyway, I've been having a fun day of some Shining Force (I found a translated iso for SF parts 2 & 3 - I own part 1 - and intend to go through the series), and looking at PS2 SRPGs that I missed, as I've a real hankering for the genre of late. It's been a quite lovely lazy Sunday afternoon.

 

On the subject of Shining Force, is Shining Force CD the Game Gear games? Is it worth playing compared to the Genesis titles?

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On holiday, so only have the switch, but taking Virtua Racing for a spin, and then driving country lanes?

 

bad juju.

 

might see if I can find some arcades later. If I’m near Camelford, Cornwall, is Newquay still my best bet?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Finally finished Legend of Xanadu 2.

 

Not because it was particularly long (took around 12 hours) but it is a bit of a slog at numerous points.

 

Some of the level design is crazy. It’s so insanely maze-like, coupled with the fact that areas are large AND paths can be hidden or hard to spot and it turns into a bit of a nightmare. I easily trudged one area for an hour before I eventually found my way.

 

TBF playing in Japanese won’t have helped. I know there were maps to collect and I don’t think I got many as there were gaps in my inventory. This was purely down to the language barrier as I avoided speaking to most people for not understanding them. So it was probably my fault.
 

Felt the boss fights were a slightly missed opportunity too. I could see them working but the main problem is that you can equip health to automatically heal you AND you can hold loads of refills. These together mean you can just tank any boss without any real need to learn them.
 

Still, I don’t think the game would look out of place on a 32bit system. Lovely big sprites, anime cutscenes with full speech. The progression of the pc engine as a system really was impressive. It used the CD media so well compared to what we saw from the Mega CD.
 

It’s made me realise I don’t think I really want to traverse JPN adventure games without some sort of patch

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To celebrate Metroid's 35th anniversary this month, I decided to play the one Metroid 2D game that had passed me by: Metroid II: Return of Samus. I remember playing this game back in 1994 or so when I got the Super Game Boy (which featured this game surprisingly quite a bit in its marketing), but I didn't really get it. The metroidvania genre didn't click with me until Super Metroid the following year, I suspect.

 

I had some apprehension about going back to it, but the release of the remake on the 3DS and the announcement of a new Metroid game this year convinced me that this was probably the best time to revisit it.

 

Metroid II is lacking in many areas in comparison to other games in the series. Samus's sprite is too big, her movement too stiff, and it really needed an in-game map. The original Metroid for FDS/NES also doesn't have an in-game map, but at least in that game the areas had their own unique theme to help you understand the layout. Metroid II's areas, however, are not so well-defined, and the first two areas looked so similar that I ended up using a map for reference. To be fair to the game, once you know how the game works a map becomes less useful, but that first hour was frustrating. Metroid II is not as much about exploration as other games in the series, and arguably TMNT: Radical Rescue is a better Metroidvania game.

 

As a mood piece, however, the game can be astonishing in places. Despite having only four colors and a limited space to work with, R&D 1 made a minor miracle in creating a game with real atmosphere and tension. There isn't any moment where you feel safe on the planet, and the game masterfully evokes strong feelings of being alone and almost despondent the further along you progress.

 

Two episodes in particular stand out: one is the oft-mentioned eerie final stage before you face the Metroid Queen. The second one was when you drop down to a level with a series of long vertical shafts with very few enemies and a Metroid at almost every turn. The level layout, assisted in no small part due to the outstanding minimalistic soundtrack, produced a really unique and memorable eerie play experience.

 

Metroid gained a lot in terms of imagery when it moved to the SNES and especially the GameCube, but there is something to be said about the abstract nature of the first two Metroid games that has been lost.

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Just finished Nexzr on the PC Engine
 

I decided on a change of pace having been through a few RPGs and had heard good things about this game.

 

Wow, got to say I thoroughly enjoyed it and it’s jumped up my list of top games on the system.


Each level is bursting with ideas and the level art is gorgeous. The first level starts you off in the thick of it with cruisers warping in as you fly up the screen, they warp in with a cool effect and start firing huge lasers, which is all very cool. In stage 2 you pass a planet super close as you get to the mid boss which looks amazing.


There’s some great music in there too. Stages 2 and 4 in particular, although 4 may be down to me practicing that stage A LOT!

 

The game has unlimited continues but this doesn’t make the game easy by any stretch. A death will send you to the last checkpoint and a game over sends you back to the start of the stage.

 

The unlimited continues did allow me to practice though, as from stage 3 you really need to learn what’s coming otherwise death is swift. Stage 4 in particular required a lot of learning, with tracking bullets and enemies as well as enemy suicide bullets to catch you out. The boss of this stage is a troll too. He can sometimes move to the bottom of the screen and fire his laser weapon, which becomes point blank and near on impossible to dodge.

 

I subscribed to this guy’s YT. He’s a huge shooter fan and this game is one of his favourites. He even got someone to translate the introduction and added the subtitles so people who don’t know Japanese can understand the story. The translated cutscene at at 4:10 in the video.

 

 

 


This game again shows off how the PC Engine better used the CD system for things like cutscenes, music, speech instead of shoehorning video into gameplay.

 

 

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Couldn’t stop thinking about this game today after finishing it yesterday and decided to go for the 1CC, given I’d used about 20 to get past stage 6.

 

BAM! Did it on my 2nd attempt! :) not only did I get the 1CC but I did it in 1 life too. I did get hit (a few times) but I always had a the trusty 1 hit shield on :) well chuffed with that.

 

 

E376F993-7213-4AD8-8FAB-836885093BD3.jpeg

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On 16/08/2021 at 10:04, DeDeDe said:

To celebrate Metroid's 35th anniversary this month, I decided to play the one Metroid 2D game that had passed me by: Metroid II: Return of Samus. I remember playing this game back in 1994 or so when I got the Super Game Boy (which featured this game surprisingly quite a bit in its marketing), but I didn't really get it. The metroidvania genre didn't click with me until Super Metroid the following year, I suspect.

 

I had some apprehension about going back to it, but the release of the remake on the 3DS and the announcement of a new Metroid game this year convinced me that this was probably the best time to revisit it.

 

Metroid II is lacking in many areas in comparison to other games in the series. Samus's sprite is too big, her movement too stiff, and it really needed an in-game map. The original Metroid for FDS/NES also doesn't have an in-game map, but at least in that game the areas had their own unique theme to help you understand the layout. Metroid II's areas, however, are not so well-defined, and the first two areas looked so similar that I ended up using a map for reference. To be fair to the game, once you know how the game works a map becomes less useful, but that first hour was frustrating. Metroid II is not as much about exploration as other games in the series, and arguably TMNT: Radical Rescue is a better Metroidvania game.

 

As a mood piece, however, the game can be astonishing in places. Despite having only four colors and a limited space to work with, R&D 1 made a minor miracle in creating a game with real atmosphere and tension. There isn't any moment where you feel safe on the planet, and the game masterfully evokes strong feelings of being alone and almost despondent the further along you progress.

 

Two episodes in particular stand out: one is the oft-mentioned eerie final stage before you face the Metroid Queen. The second one was when you drop down to a level with a series of long vertical shafts with very few enemies and a Metroid at almost every turn. The level layout, assisted in no small part due to the outstanding minimalistic soundtrack, produced a really unique and memorable eerie play experience.

 

Metroid gained a lot in terms of imagery when it moved to the SNES and especially the GameCube, but there is something to be said about the abstract nature of the first two Metroid games that has been lost.

 

I've started Metroid on the NES.  Then going to go thought the series.  I've never played any of the GBA games or Prime series.  I also have AMR2 to play.

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1 hour ago, simms said:

I've started Metroid on the NES.  Then going to go thought the series.  I've never played any of the GBA games or Prime series.  I also have AMR2 to play.

 

Sounds great. If it’s your first time playing Metroid 1 and II, I would strongly recommend using a map, or drawing your own. (Falcon Zero’s map of the original is good and somewhat spoiler-free, I think.) Metroid 1’s areas are color-coded, which means that you can get a feel of the world in general, but the game design can be maddening at times. And, as I mentioned in my previous post, the initial areas in Metroid II look too similar.

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2 hours ago, DeDeDe said:

 

Sounds great. If it’s your first time playing Metroid 1 and II, I would strongly recommend using a map, or drawing your own. (Falcon Zero’s map of the original is good and somewhat spoiler-free, I think.) Metroid 1’s areas are color-coded, which means that you can get a feel of the world in general, but the game design can be maddening at times. And, as I mentioned in my previous post, the initial areas in Metroid II look too similar.


oh yes absolutely. I wanted to go in all hardcore but modern games have spoiled me with their fancy in-game maps and I struggled with directions going to the same dead area multiple times and my lack of direction compounded this.  I ended up finding a lovely site that has brilliant maps with graphics seemingly lifted out of the game somehow.  I used the one without items shown so as not to hand hold me too much and spoil the experience.  Great maps here:

 

https://nesmaps.com/maps/Metroid/MetroidCompleteMapBG.html

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Currently playing Exile on the PC Engine.

 

Was interested to play this as it has the mix of above view and side scrolling that Zelda 2 has.

 

About 4 hours in now and I think I’m actually well on the way to finishing it. It doesn’t have the expanse of the Zelda 2 over world and is a lot more straightward side scrolling wise, I’d actually put it more in lines with something like Ys3.

 

The overarching story is strangely familiar, this ring any bells with people? (Snippet from Wikipedia)

 

The Exile series centers on Sadler, a Syrian Assassin, who is the main character of each game. The original computer versions were notorious for featuring various references to religious historical figures, modern political leaders, iconography, drugs, and time-travelling assassins,

 

I was in one section where there was a village being ravaged and they were literally burning people alive at the stake! (This was apparently removed from the MD version)

 

One WTF moment is the boss fights, which at times appear completely broken. Broken in the sense that they seem to be completely invincible at certain points without any indication. You stand there slashing them with your sword and nothing is happening and then suddenly bang, you get your hit. I think this has something to do with them being invincible during certain attacks.


I think it scored quite well back in the day but I’d consider it fairly average TBH.

 

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