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Xbox 2 specs


Uncle Nasty
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It's hardly the most difficult to program for if so many games get released (not forgetting the amount of small developers that create games on the console, generally shit ones).

Mr Pickford, how hard has it been for you? I'm genuinely intereseted, because with the scale of releases, it just seems that people have been using the multiple processors as an excuse.

PS2 is probably the hardest machine to code for ever. We (and many others) moved over to middleware fairly early on as it was proving far too time consuming to code an engine from scratch.

Using middleware makes things easy, especially cross-platform development. The downside is you are unlike to get maximum performance from the hardware.

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The point I'm trying to make is the availability of BB against the DC's internet access via a telephone line. Just about everyone has a telephone line. The DC gave you a wire to plug in and away you go. The Xbox requires an extra bit of kit - a broadband modem (cable, ADSL - whatever). There is something physically extra between the console and the hole in the wall. I would consider this a peripheral. The DC just needed a phone socket as they gave you the modem. If the Xbox gave you the modem built in then I would accept this. But it doesn't. So I don't.

Do you see what I'm getting at?

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Yeah, I'm sure Renderware would be no where near as popular if the PS2 wasn't so daunting to work with. That was what ruined the first few months of it.

Very suprising, too... seeing as the original Playstation was so easy to work on.

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I see what you're getting at Squirtle. Getting a DC online involved little more than typing your phone number in and putting the supplied multi-adapter in my phone socket. Or if we compare XBL to a peripheral like a Sega 32X. I assume you just had to slot that together with your megadrive. Easy. With XBL you need a subscription, a broadband fee, maybe a PC or a router and then you need to fiddle about with settings which are different on everybody's setup. I did it easily because I'm l33t (or whatever) but I imagine some people found it a bit of a fiddle. "Out of the box" my arse.

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The point I'm trying to make is the availability of BB against the DC's internet access via a telephone line. Just about everyone has a telephone line. The DC gave you a wire to plug in and away you go. The Xbox requires an extra bit of kit - a broadband modem (cable, ADSL - whatever). There is something physically extra between the console and the hole in the wall. I would consider this a peripheral. The DC just needed a phone socket as they gave you the modem. If the Xbox gave you the modem built in then I would accept this. But it doesn't. So I don't.

Do you see what I'm getting at?

I don't see WHY you're saying it. My original point way back when was that if the HD becomes a peripheral, then developers will naturally back off from including it in their games because they always look to maximise sales. The same can't be levelled at online gaming because takeup of broadband is expected to grow, everyone knows it will, and for the time being MS can safely encourage developers to take it up in the knowledge that everyone with a console can at least potentially play that mode.

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With XBL you need a subscription, a broadband fee, maybe a PC or a router and then you need to fiddle about with settings which are different on everybody's setup. I did it easily because I'm l33t (or whatever) but I imagine some people found it a bit of a fiddle. "Out of the box" my arse.

Mine was out the box cos I have broadband and a router already. It was suprisingly easy, I didn't have to touch any settings...

It's weird when I read about people needing to put in loads of stuff for PS2/Xbox to get it working online. With both of mine I just plugged in a wireless bridge and turned it on. Auto-setup and I was online.

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Come to think of it, if they drop the HD they HAVE to drop the backwards compatibility.

Maybe not... Couldn't the surplus RAM be used to emulate the hard disk? I dunno how extensively the biggest games cache to the hard disk, but surely the 448Mb of spare RAM would be enough for most games?

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The point I'm trying to make is the availability of BB against the DC's internet access via a telephone line. Just about everyone has a telephone line. The DC gave you a wire to plug in and away you go. The Xbox requires an extra bit of kit - a broadband modem (cable, ADSL - whatever). There is something physically extra between the console and the hole in the wall. I would consider this a peripheral. The DC just needed a phone socket as they gave you the modem. If the Xbox gave you the modem built in then I would accept this. But it doesn't. So I don't.

Do you see what I'm getting at?

I plugged my cable line into my Xbox and turned it on. The Xbox did the rest automatically (except for my credit card/username stuff, obviously). Though I'm probably an exception to the rule.

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Maybe not... Couldn't the surplus RAM be used to emulate the hard disk? I dunno how extensively the biggest games cache to the hard disk, but surely the 448Mb of spare RAM would be enough for most games?

I'm not sure to be honest. But 'most' isn't 'all' and backward compatibility would mean all games work, which means the new machine would have to appear identical to the old as far as the software is concerned.

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Mine was out the box cos I have broadband and a router already. It was suprisingly easy, I didn't have to touch any settings...

Of course. I found it easy too and already had the setup. We're l33t. Go us! etc.

(I do think MS did a great job in making it as easy as possible, but its still an (expensive) hurdle, and a cheap, subsidised HDD peripheral probably wouldn't make a big difference, especially if it was only required for MMORPGs etc.)

PS2 online: do you need a HDD for all games, or just Final Fantasy? I don't know.

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I don't see WHY you're saying it. My original point way back when was that if the HD becomes a peripheral, then developers will naturally back off from including it in their games because they always look to maximise sales. The same can't be levelled at online gaming because takeup of broadband is expected to grow, everyone knows it will, and for the time being MS can safely encourage developers to take it up in the knowledge that everyone with a console can at least potentially play that mode.

I was just giving an example of what I think is a peripheral that is needed that hasn't stood in the way of games being designed for it. If, as some have suggested, the HD comes bundled with a new live Kit then it will be catered for.

(And to be perfectly honest, I've kinda forgotten what my point was. I did have one though... ;) )

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Personally, I think the Playstation brand has been re-enforced dramatically by backwards compatibility. Both the PSone & 2 will be emulated on the PS3, this (to my mind anyway) lends a certain reliability to the Playstation brand, in the sense that I can buy one machine and have an enormous game catalogue to choose from from the word go. People picking their first console in the next gen race, are bound to have their decision influenced by the number (and not to mention price) of the games available for the system.

What attracted me to the Xbox in the first place, was it's power, superior DVD playback, and of course, Halo. Now assuming (and it does seem a pretty safe bet), that this time all three consoles will be pretty much equal in power terms, DVD playback should all be at least the same level of the current Xbox (which is all I really require), then you've already taken two of the biggest Xbox pulls, away from it's successor.

If I were Microsoft, I wouldn't be taking risks with Xbox2. If losing a $50 hard drive really does cost them backwards compatibility, then I really would be considering just how many sales they will lose due to the lack of this feature. I for one was hoping to be able to link Xbox up with Xbox2, transfer all game saves and music, sell Xbox, and upgrade. The lack of continuity in the brand for me at any rate, will certainly reflect my decision to upgrade at a later date, if at all.

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Personally, I think the Playstation brand has been re-enforced dramatically by backwards compatibility. Both the PSone & 2 will be emulated on the PS3, this (to my mind anyway) lends a certain reliability to the Playstation brand, in the sense that I can buy one machine and have an enormous game catalogue to choose from from the word go. People picking their first console in the next gen race, are bound to have their decision influenced by the number (and not to mention price) of the games available for the system.

What attracted me to the Xbox in the first place, was it's power, superior DVD playback, and of course, Halo. Now assuming (and it does seem a pretty safe bet), that this time all three consoles will be pretty much equal in power terms, DVD playback should all be at least the same level of the current Xbox (which is all I really require), then you've already taken two of the biggest Xbox pulls, away from it's successor.

If I were Microsoft, I wouldn't be taking risks with Xbox2. If losing a $50 hard drive really does cost them backwards compatibility, then I really would be considering just how many sales they will lose due to the lack of this feature. I for one was hoping to be able to link Xbox up with Xbox2, transfer all game saves and music, sell Xbox, and upgrade. The lack of continuity in the brand for me at any rate, will certainly reflect my decision to upgrade at a later date, if at all.

And those of us who see backwards compatibility as being in some way restrictive to "moving forward" with the whole console concept?

Like, it can't use feature A because PS1 and 2 need feature B?

for example I mean.

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Personally, I think the Playstation brand has been re-enforced dramatically by backwards compatibility. Both the PSone & 2 will be emulated on the PS3

I'm sure it was announced ages ago that the PS3 would not be backwards compatible with the PS1 - just the PS2.

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Don't quote me on that ;) I can't remember if it's completely true or not.

well, to be honest, I doubt I'll be buying a PS3 anyway.

or, for that matter, any next generation console - at least not until I've fully played through all my games on the current generation.

(though this will probably turn out to be a lie)

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Well, I dont know about you guys but Im a million miles away from filling up my Xbox HD. What if they just kept it at 8GB? Surely by then, the price would be miniscule? If you want a bigger HD, put in a new one or something or however the PS2 HD is slotted in.

That way, everyone has a HD but those who want a bigger one will do that.

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Well, I dont know about you guys but Im a million miles away from filling up my Xbox HD. What if they just kept it at 8GB? Surely by then, the price would be miniscule? If you want a bigger HD, put in a new one or something or however the PS2 HD is slotted in.

That way, everyone has a HD but those who want a bigger one will do that.

It doesn't work that way with HD prices. Capacies increase and they stop making the smaller ones. Even now some Xbox's have bigger drives, even though you can't access the extra space.

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