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Mark Kermode's Secrets of Cinema - Tuesdays 9pm BBC 4

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On ‎02‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 11:36, grindmouse said:

It’s in my list of forgettable British crime thrillers. They do a heist and then it’s sort of a whodunnit as one of them double-crosses the rest (it’s a first act spoiler so not giving anything away), and the revelation of who that is and the climax are poor IIRC. It’s been a long time since I watched it, but this is an example of where I think Kermode is recommending a film based on it’s context and director, rather than anything exceptional or must-watch.

 

If you watch a lot films and are interested it’s not terrible way to spend 90mins, but it’s not some unearthed gem.

 

The world largely agrees with you on this one, 42% on Rotten Tomatoes is harsh, and letterboxd users aren't that fond of it. And I agree Kermode picked it out to acknowledge the director. I disagree with him about the 'dynamite soundtrack', it was its weakest aspect, playing mediocre 90s rock over some of the intense shoot outs and romantic scenes. Had to forgive it and accept it added to its charm. 

 

So, obviously, finally watched it and..loved it. Far better than I thought it would be. It's hardly a mystery thriller so it didn't matter as to how it finally played out in terms of being a revelation, what mattered from beginning to end was how brilliant to watch it was, from the directing to the performances and the dialogue. Robert Carlyle in a 90s film showing the humdrum of ordinary life is magic. He's so good, so honest, never performing. There's a lot more to the film in terms of its commentary,

Spoiler

a career criminal who was once politically active who has since given up. Who admits crime doesn't pay (literally), yet continues on his path anyway. None of this is new, but it worked for me because Carlyle is so convincing with it. 

 

mega spoilers

 

Spoiler
Spoiler
Spoiler

I enjoyed the hell out of that final police station shoot out - laughing my head off at just the attempt, then the betrayal yet again, and how on earth they're going to get out of this. It doesn't play on that, or stretch it out, which is maybe a shame. It becomes an after thought as to whether Lena Headey will turn up at the meeting position and even to the end can conjure some tension as a slow moving police vehicle stalks Carlyle. I didn't think she would arrive (I know...it's obvious really I guess), so the film kept me engaged as to whether Carlyle's character would end up in jail or get a fresh start. The film ends optimistically. 

 

 

 

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I know this is TV, not the podcast discussion, but anyone else find Clarisse Loughery hard to listen to?

Like, she’s good when she is reading her pre-planned, researched reviews and her criticism is often interesting and well-articulated, but this week’s podcast opposite Sanjeev was poor. Her delivery is all over the place, exacerbated by her accent, it sounds like she’s super nervous all the time, and there’s no flow to her delivery, it’s all awkward pauses and “I feel that”, which is fine except she’s not doing a podcast she’s on the BBC opposite Sanjeev Bhaskar who’s been in lots of tv and movies and clearly knows his stuff and can deliver it clearly and justify his opinions. So as a presenter you had him constantly prodding “the expert” and you could hear her winging it and making broad generalisations, whilst he was giving more thoughtful questions and comments.

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1 hour ago, grindmouse said:

I know this is TV, not the podcast discussion, but anyone else find Clarisse Loughery hard to listen to?

Like, she’s good when she is reading her pre-planned, researched reviews and her criticism is often interesting and well-articulated, but this week’s podcast opposite Sanjeev was poor. Her delivery is all over the place, exacerbated by her accent, it sounds like she’s super nervous all the time, and there’s no flow to her delivery, it’s all awkward pauses and “I feel that”, which is fine except she’s not doing a podcast she’s on the BBC opposite Sanjeev Bhaskar who’s been in lots of tv and movies and clearly knows his stuff and can deliver it clearly and justify his opinions. So as a presenter you had him constantly prodding “the expert” and you could hear her winging it and making broad generalisations, whilst he was giving more thoughtful questions and comments.

Pretty much agree with all that. I like her to a point, and often agree with her reviews, but she doesn't seem like a natural presenter. Not a patch on Robbie Collin.

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On 29/10/2018 at 14:09, grindmouse said:

I know this is TV, not the podcast discussion, but anyone else find Clarisse Loughery hard to listen to?

Like, she’s good when she is reading her pre-planned, researched reviews and her criticism is often interesting and well-articulated, but this week’s podcast opposite Sanjeev was poor. 

 

My wife and I can't listen to her reviews either, actually- she frequently struggles to articulate herself and her insights concerning the film at hand are often strikingly obvious. We can't believe that the BBC continue to have her on. Perhaps she's improved since the reviews we've seen but we tend to skip her reviews by default.

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14 minutes ago, DeciderVT said:

 

My wife and I can't listen to her reviews either, actually- she frequently struggles to articulate herself and her insights concerning the film at hand are often strikingly obvious. We can't believe that the BBC continue to have her on. Perhaps she's improved since the reviews we've seen but we tend to skip her reviews by default.

 

Yes - I think I meant well-phrased rather than well-articulated, because her delivery is generally poor. But especially when she's challenged or the review becomes conversational, she tends to struggle.

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After posting my previous comment I looked into who she is for the first time and found that she was offered the job of guest presenter based on her YouTube channel, so I might watch a few of her videos to see if she fares better there. Perhaps I've missed something.

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Watched four of these over a couple of nights. Just made me want to watch all the movies all over again.

 

cant believe no room for 3000 Miles to Graceland in Heist tho :(

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Kermode raved about the Bros documentary on two editions of wittertainment...

 

It’s gash. Failed the one laugh test. Staged arguments and a laboured X Factor sob story that amounts to an extended promo/marketing material for the band. 

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On 30 January 2019 at 20:46, linkster said:

 

cant believe no room for 3000 Miles to Graceland in Heist tho :(

 

Costner's best role.

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People thought the supposedly band-ending spat over one brother wanting to try out something in the live session was completely genuine?

 

No cynicism when it comes to Bros, please!

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On 04/01/2020 at 10:18, Sarlaccfood said:

Oh great!

 

I wonder what genre they’ll be about this time?

 

The three episodes are going to be on superheroes, British History, and spy films.

 

That's one of a few announcements about BBC film programmes:

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2020/life-cinematic

 

Quote

BBC Arts announces the opening line up for upcoming Life Cinematic, a new series of television specials featuring world-renowned directors exploring the art of filmmaking

 

Life Cinematic will begin with a programme featuring 1917 director Sam Mendes. Subsequent episodes will feature Shaun Of The Dead director Edgar Wright and Fifty Shades Of Grey director Sam Taylor-Johnson

 

Mark Kermode’s Secrets Of Cinema returns with three brand new episodes, exploring the subjects of Superheroes, British History and Spies in film

 

The BBC’s exploration of film of television complemented by Inside Cinema, online video essays available on BBC iPlayer each exploring a single topic related to the world of film

 

A long essay special - Inside Cinema: Meet The Family to be broadcast on BBC Four

 

They're getting in on the YouTube video essay game too:

 

Quote

Complementing the BBC’s coverage of film on television, Inside Cinema, online video essays produced by Little Dot Studios have been commissioned to tie into a range of the most exciting and relevant contemporary film releases, classic film anniversaries and significant talking points in the wider world.

Behind the video essays are some of the best and brightest critical minds, with commissions in progress from film critic Simran Hans, video essayist Grace Lee, critic and broadcaster Robbie Collin, video essayist Leigh Singer, broadcaster Michael Leader, and writer Christina Newland.

 

Video essays include:

 

The Long Voyage Of The Movie Spacesuit - a look at everything from obsessively realistic recreations of NASA’s finest threads in First Man, to flights of cosmic fashion fantasy in Barbarella

 

The Menace Of Miniatures - why are we at once drawn to, and repelled by, the creepy miniature world of the dolls’ house, as seen in Hereditary, The Shining and The Lovely Bones.

 

Nixon's America, A Country Divided - during Vietnam and Watergate, cinema fiercely questioned the status quo and biked down Route ’66, long hair streaming in the wind: but did anything really change?

 

The Changing Shape Of The Action Hero - an entirely level-headed look at the changing shape of the male body in action movies, from rugged Dirty Harry, to bulging Arnie, through to the leaner 90s, and today’s buff superheroes

 

When Meg Met Nora - director Nora Ephron (When Harry Met Sally) dubbed her favourite star Meg Ryan ‘America’s Sweetheart’, we look how that ended up being both a blessing and a curse that hung over Ryan’s career.

 

The Sixth Sense: A Game-Changer With A Twist - how an unknown filmmaker delivered a smash-hit sleeper horror hit, spooked the Oscars and redefined the movie twist ending forever

 

Why Tim Burton Is The Only Director To Get Gotham Right - how an Oscar-winning masterpiece of production design, created by two genius minds, now stands as a Gothic monument to practical filmmaking craft. Tim Burton: The hero Gotham deserves

 

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That Tim Burton one sounds great. I got mildly obsessed with Anton Furst's designs for Gotham around the time Batman came out and the Gotham he and Burton created still stays in my head as the one all the versions of Batman lives in whenever I'm reading a comic. 

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