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Wireframe - a new gaming magazine (yes, on real paper)


ianinthefuture
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Red Dead Redemption review. 76%!

 

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Breathtakingly vast and beautiful, RDR2 nonetheless relies on decade-old mechanics in a world that has, quite frankly, moved on.

 

https://wireframe.raspberrypi.org/features/red-dead-redemption-2-review?utm_source=Raspberry+Pi+Press+Newsletter&utm_campaign=e08270d3f0-WF_RSS_EMAIL&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e2ce89f288-e08270d3f0-495498087&mc_cid=e08270d3f0&mc_eid=5ece2ece88

 

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On 16/11/2018 at 12:59, womblingfree said:

 

I had this too but can’t remember anything about it. Was it a freebie? Maybe my dad bought it if not??

 

On 16/11/2018 at 13:42, deKay said:

I still have it. There was a whole range of them.

 

Is that of the Usborne computer books? I loved them as a teenager.

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Well I finally found time to read through issue 1 yesterday, and I was very surprised.... as it was really rather excellent. I read through it more or less cover to cover in an hour on the train. It seems completely fresh and modern compared to Edge, and there was more of a focus on independent games, some of which I had not heard of. I also thought the article about how mathematics is used in games was really good, and very interesting. I have subscribed with the VIP offer, which was 12 issues for £12.

 

The only problem is, two weeks is a very short turn around, lets hope they are able to maintain the quality and diversity of the content.

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I got my free copy (to Norway) of issue 1 a few weeks back, good read. Opted for the subscription, £21 for 12 issues shipped overseas isn't too bad, I'll see if I continue my sub after those 12. Issue 2 was just posted so hopefully it will arrive next week.

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Still waiting for my copy of issue 2, which is a shame as I was looking forward to reading it this weekend! Also, having spelled out in some detail things which had bothered me in the first issue, I feel a little bad for not drawing more attention to the things I liked about it:

  • Aside from the general broad focus of the magazine and willingness to look at more technical/'under the skin' stuff than most, I really enjoyed the Citycraft article - just a nice, reasonably light look at a subject I don't see discussed all that often, and makes me look forward to Dimopoulos's upcoming Virtual Cities.
  • Similarly, though I had serious reservations about the sample code attached to it, I very much liked the article about Defender's explosions - a fascinating look at the development of a classic game through a uniquely narrow lens, I'd love to see more things like that.
  • The discussion of resource-minimising techniques in game development offered an equally interesting choice of focus on the development process, helped by the fact it was from the perspective of the development of games I've loved.
  • A retrospective of Treasure was welcome simply in the fact that it was a retrospective of, well, Treasure, who seem to manage that odd trick of being lauded but also frequently forgotten about. Slight downside: the only way is down from hereon in!

So, yes, I'm hoping for more pieces similar to the above in this fortnight's issue, and a bit less of the weirdly self-aggrandising waffle or hollow jargon disguised up as deep mathematical lessons.

 

Edit: speak of the devil:

25284795_WireframeIssue2.jpg.90c1f31b952ec2311c0389491b6f137d.jpg

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Issue 2 turned up for me yesterday, but I'm still getting through the first one. I read a chunk of that today though and I must say I've really enjoyed it. Even the device stuff I wasn't expecting to like proved interesting.

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The article on RPG development was interesting, especially the quotes from that one developer who was very matter of fact about the nuts and bolts of building such games in comparison to the practically unlimited freedom P&P RPG developers have, as they can rely on human imagination/interaction to fill in the blanks.

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I really like how personable and welcoming the tone is. Someone could be thinking of getting in to games, pick this up and find an article that ends with “go off and try to make up a board game which has this and that concept in it” and be really inspired.

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