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What books did you read in 2019?


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I read Don’t Hold My Head Down by Lucy-Ann Holmes the other day. It’s a very interesting read about the aithor’s exploration of her sexuality. The writing style isn’t wonderful, she’s a YA/mag writer  so it’s all a bit twee in that regard, but it’s also a very personal exploration of her own sexual experience and identity, and the societal factors that contributed to it.

 

Incidentally I’m also listening to the amazing audiobook of Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook at the moment, and it’s depressing to note how many similar experiences and feelings Lessing’s Anna and Holmes seem to have shared, some sixty years apart.

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4. Masters Of War by Chris Ryan

I read this mainly because I have enjoyed the Strike Back TV series. This is the first book in the Danny Black series of novels and it was a lot better than I was expecting. Compared to similar military thrillers, which felt like being hit in the face with a plank of wood, this was a well-crafted read. The political backdrop was very simplistic, a Tom Clancy-style in-depth tome this is not, the story instead concentrates on a more intimate on-the-ground story with our protagonist, a young SAS member, in Syria babysitting an MI6 agent aiming to do a deal with a rebel leader. It's surprisingly balanced, not too gung-ho but not anti-war either, the main commentary coming in the descriptions of war-torn Syria and the people caught up in it. Other than that it's just a straightforward thriller really, readable, some twists and turns, bit of military lingo thrown in for flavour. I'll read the next one.

 

Previous:

Spoiler

1. The Panama Papers by Frederik Obermaier and Bastian Obermayer
2. Broken Skin by Stuart McBride
3. Can't Stand Up For Falling Down by Allan Jones

 

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When do you guys do all your reading? I drive to work and listen to music so I'm not reading or listening to audiobook on my commute. I tend to do most of my reading just before bed, for about 20 minutes before I fall asleep, and then for another 15 minutes or so in the morning over breakfast.

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On 22/03/2019 at 21:53, Jamie John said:

When do you guys do all your reading? I drive to work and listen to music so I'm not reading or listening to audiobook on my commute. I tend to do most of my reading just before bed, for about 20 minutes before I fall asleep, and then for another 15 minutes or so in the morning over breakfast.

I'm all over the place when it comes to reading. Audiobooks are listened to in the bath, some Sunday mornings in bed or when I'm walking to the shops. Other books I tend to read before bed, on the loo and at work I'll find one of the small meeting rooms on a lunchtime and get a few pages done there. I try really hard to fit some reading in when I can rather than just zoning out or daydreaming.

 

 

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5. The Speed Of Sound by Thomas Dolby

Was looking forward to giving this a listen as I had a passing knowledge of his pop career and memories of seeing him talking about interactive audio in the 90s, and whilst this does cover all that I found myself not really enjoying this, partly because the book was clearly written with an American audience in mind, but also it goes into tedious detail about all the goings-on in 90s Silicon Valley, with talk of IPOs, VC funding rounds, and corporate chancers.It had the potential to be an interesting account of an exciting period of Internet history, and granted this was more his personal story so I'm being unreasonable really, but it did drag on towards the end.

 

Spoiler

 

1. The Panama Papers by Frederik Obermaier and Bastian Obermayer
2. Broken Skin by Stuart McBride
3. Can't Stand Up For Falling Down by Allan Jones

4. Masters Of War by Chris Ryan

5. The Speed Of Sound by Thomas Dolby

 

 

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Previous:

 

Spoiler

 

1. Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

2. Sea of Thieves: Athena's Fortune by Chris Allcock

3. How To Be Right in a World Gone Wrong by James O'Brien

4. Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late by Kieron Dyer with Oliver Holt

5. Our Story by Ron and Reg Kray with Fred Dineage

6. Step By Step - The Life in My Journeys by Simon Reeve

7. How Not To Be A Boy by Robert Webb

 

 

8. Cheer Up Peter Reid by Peter Reid

 

Got Peter Reid's autobiography on a Kindle daily deal, and there's nothing much to say about it.  A very 'vanilla' autobiography, not that much in the way of juicy football gossip and I wasn't that surprised to see him long for the 'good old days' when tough tackling and heavy drinking was the order of the day.  Won't go on about this too much but probably not really worth it, there are far better football autobiographies out there (Kieron Dyer's which I read earlier this year for one).

 

2/5

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9. The Water Cure by Sarah MacIntosh. Booker long-listed debut from last year. It’s a dystopian tale of a family living on an island surrounded by a toxin-saturated world. Division between men and women is apparent from the start and it’s a compelling story which is a mixture of The Handmaid’s Tale, King Lear and The Virgin Suicides. 

 

Recommended. 

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13. All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy. I loved this. I'm sure I've owned the book for over 20 years, but somehow never got round to reading it, so I got it on Audible and I'm glad I did - I thought the narrator did a great job of capturing the flow and tone of the book. This is my third McCarthy novel (The Road and Blood Meridian were the others) and perhaps my favourite so far.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

 

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6. Divine Justice by David Baldacci

It's another Camel Club novel by David Baldacci, it's a supermarket-pulp thriller thing with twists and action and all that, easy to read and enjoyable. Other than that it's unremarkable, purely entertaining.


 

Spoiler

 

1. The Panama Papers by Frederik Obermaier and Bastian Obermayer
2. Broken Skin by Stuart McBride
3. Can't Stand Up For Falling Down by Allan Jones

4. Masters Of War by Chris Ryan

5. The Speed Of Sound by Thomas Dolby

6. Divine Justice by David Baldacci

 

 

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On 03/04/2019 at 11:39, Miner Willy said:

13. All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy. I loved this. I'm sure I've owned the book for over 20 years, but somehow never got round to reading it, so I got it on Audible and I'm glad I did - I thought the narrator did a great job of capturing the flow and tone of the book. This is my third McCarthy novel (The Road and Blood Meridian were the others) and perhaps my favourite so far.

 

Previously:

 

  Reveal hidden contents

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

 

 

Although All the Pretty Horses is lovely, I'm surprised you enjoyed it more than The Road and Blood Meridian. If you like his work you should definitely give No Country for Old Men a go. It's much more of a page turner than AtPT. There are two other novels in the border trilogy as well, which AtPT belongs to: The Crossing and Cities on the Plain. Child of God is the best of his earlier stuff.

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1 hour ago, Jamie John said:

 

Although All the Pretty Horses is lovely, I'm surprised you enjoyed it more than The Road and Blood Meridian. If you like his work you should definitely give No Country for Old Men a go. It's much more of a page turner than AtPT. There are two other novels in the border trilogy as well, which AtPT belongs to: The Crossing and Cities on the Plain. Child of God is the best of his earlier stuff.

 

The Road is great, but felt very bleak. I only read Blood Meridian last year and confess I struggled with it, despite knowing people whose views I respect who love it. I'm tempted to think that if the same narrator read that I'd have warmed to it more - he really draws you in to McCarthy's writing style. 

 

The others in the border trilogy are already on the list. Don't seem to have the same narrator on audible though, unfortunately. 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Miner Willy said:

 

The Road is great, but felt very bleak. I only read Blood Meridian last year and confess I struggled with it, despite knowing people whose views I respect who love it. I'm tempted to think that if the same narrator read that I'd have warmed to it more - he really draws you in to McCarthy's writing style. 

 

The others in the border trilogy are already on the list. Don't seem to have the same narrator on audible though, unfortunately. 

 

 

 

Yeah, Blood Meridian would be quite tough to listen to, I imagine. A lot of the more poetic passages in it benefit from being read through a few times.

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14. The Tattooist of Auschwitz. Think I got this on a whim as an Audible deal of the day. It's unsurprisingly a harrowing and enlightening (true) story, but sadly it was somewhat undermined by a very dodgy audio recording.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

 

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Finished The Body Snatchers the other day. Thought it was great, and nice to read the source material for my fave movie version, the 70s one. I love the pacing of some of these classic SF books. TBS in particular just hits the ground running.

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Jarhead- Anthony Swofford.

 

Gulf war memoir of a sniper  who saw very little action  due  probably to America bombing the fuck out of most of the Iraqi forces before most ground forces could engage.  Details the tedium and depression of most of the soldiers lives as the wait for combat  and in the very brief instances of actual combat experienced by the author leaves him disappointed and disillusioned. It echos a lot of other 1st hand accounts of war  but gives a  unique insight into  such a one sided fight.  the author's account of the Iraqi    casualties is horrifying and the subject of nightmare fuel and the movie seems relatively faithful. I picked it up for $1 in the local 2nd hand bookshop and got through it pretty quickly (it's not long either) , interesting enough read but hard to recommend unless you really  like war memoirs.Being a soldier sounds shit , regardless of whether you're at war or not.

 

 

 

 

 

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15. Normal People by Sally Rooney. Another Audible deal of the day that I bought on impulse and probably wouldn't have read otherwise, but actually really enjoyed. I felt it really captured so much of growing up and learning about relationships, and has likeable, believably flawed characters. However, I'm not sure I understand how it became quite such a sensation.

 

Oh, and I again didn't love the Audible narrator. Maybe I'm just becoming a grump.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

 

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I really am reading very slowly this year. Last year’s book per week has become this year’s book per month.

 

4. Neurotribes - Steve Silberman 

 

The title might make it sound like a sci-fi novel, but the subtitle dispels any confusion: “the legacy of autism and how to think smarter about people who think differently.” I bought this (for 99p in a Kindle sale) because we have an adult daughter with Asperger’s, and since her diagnosis about 8 years ago I’ve realised that I’m a fair way along the spectrum too. I’m not sure what I was expecting this book to contain, but I wasn’t expecting what it turned out to be, which is a thorough and comprehensive history of the understanding and treatment of autism as it has changed over the years since Asperger in the 1930s. At first when I realised that’s what the book was, I was a bit disappointed, but by the end I realised that it was a great way to talk about autism, because it has been so misunderstood and subject to so many controversies in that time. It’s a fascinating story and very sad because of all the people who have been misdiagnosed and mistreated as a result. And there are several depressingly recurring themes, including various researchers and practitioners putting their own careers and prestige over the lives of the people they were supposedly helping. Some of that was down to lack of understanding, but there was plenty of good old-fashioned corruption too. But it ends positively because now, due to the internet, autistic people are able to have a voice and speak up for themselves collectively for the first time.

 

I recognised so much of my own daughter in the accounts of autistic lives, and of our own feelings reflected in the parents’ stories. Others without that personal connection might not get so much out of it but I found it both interesting and useful, which isn’t a word I often use to describe a book.

 

1. The Long Walk - Richard Bachman (Stephen King)


2. The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury 
3. Interview with the Vampire - Anne Rice 

4. Neurotribes - Steve Silberman

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QBVII by Leon Uris. It’s a split-narrative story of a Polish doctor knighted by the UK but later takes an American author to court over a claim of operating unnecessarily on Jews in a Nazi concentration camp which ultimately plays out in the UK high court, hence the name

 

it’s from 1971 and there are some frankly unpleasant themes regarding women - they are either selfish, grasping, worthless wives (but are great in bed) or socialites (also great in bed). Or mothers. He doesnt strike you as a very forward thinking chap

 

The meat of the book, however, concerns the wartime atrocities and these frankly made me feel anxious, depressed and nauseous, not least because there are grandstanding speeches by QC in which they talk of how nobody would ever have thought a civilised society capable of what Germany ultimately did, but how when you dehumanise a race you make anything possible, and 1971 or not it made me despair at how entire segments ring true with what is happening in the US right now

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16. The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis. Very different to the two previous Lewis books I've read (The Big Short and The Fifth Risk). It tells the story of psychologist/economists Daniel Kahneman (I've read one of his books) and Amos Tversky (who I'd never even heard of). Interesting to hear how Kahneman came to many of his ideas, and Tversky sounds like an incredible person, but overall I didn't find it as captivating as the other Lewis books I've read. 

 

Previously:

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

 

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Read a few books over the Easter break. 

 

Firstly, Journeyman by Ben Smith. The autobiography of a lower league football player. I think I might have been a bit more emotionally invested in the book if I'd known anything about him but it seemed to be a fairly open account of the travails of a decent professional/amateur footballer. It wasn't particularly illuminating but I felt the need to finish it off when I'd got half way through. 

 

Secondly, a new slice of sci-fi by a debut writer, Do you dream of Terra-Two? by Temi Oh. The plot centres around a group of British astronauts who have been trained to travel across the galaxy to reach a new Earth-like planet, Terra Two. The majority of the astronauts are teenagers who have effectively been groomed to perform the mission. It's not hard sci-fi and is more in keeping with books like The Martian. The chapters fluctuate between the various protagonists and whilst occasionally predictable, it's a good read. 

 

Thirdly, The Wall by John Lanchester. From the author of Capital. It's an eminently believable scenario; a wall has been erected around the UK to protect The Others from entering the country following a fairly cataclysmic event, The Change.   The book is concerned with a new recruit who is tasked with manning one of the monitoring stations on the wall. I thought it was excellent and in part this was down to the lack of bloat; whilst it's not a thrill-a-minute page-turner, it's tightly written and engaging throughout. 

 

Spoiler

1.The Life and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah

2. Borne by Jeff VanderMeer.

3. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine.

4.In your defence:Stories of Life and Law by Sarah Langford

5.My Thoughts Exactly by Lily Allen

6. Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky

7. 84k by Claire North

8. Chalk Man by C. J. Tudor

9. The Water Cure by Sarah MacIntosh

10. Journeyman by Ben Smith

11.Do you dream of Terra-Two by Temi Oh

12. The Wall by John Lanchester

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7. American Gods, Neil Gaiman

 

image.png.c26315b2d2e31884d9a9edcf08a86075.png

 

I thought I would enjoy this more than I did, and the fact that it's nearly taken me two months to get through is quite telling (although I did read a couple of issues of Edge in that time as well). It's good for the first two thirds (and it's at this point that I stopped reading it when I tried it several years ago) but in the final act he seems to do that thing which Pratchett does towards the end of lots of his novels where he tends to flit around from scene to scene, between dimensions and planes of existence and so on in a sort of willfully ambiguous way, and it's all a bit tiring. It's a good thing I read this on Kindle, too, with its ability to search Wikipedia for different words and phrases, otherwise a lot of the allusions to gods from various pantheons would have been right over my head.

 

I've only read a few of Gaiman's novels but I've yet to find one that I've thought was truly fantastic, given how well-received he is in sci-fi circles.

 

Next up: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. I've had this sitting on my Kindle for bloody years and must be the only person in the world who has yet to read it.

 

Previously:

Spoiler

1. Life, the Universe and Everything, Douglas Adams.

2. The Spy Who Came In From the Cold, John Lewis Carre

3. The Fishermen, Chigozie Obioma

4. Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Robert Louis Stevenson

5. The Black Echo, Michael Connelly

6. Ready Player One, Ernest Cline

 

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On 05/04/2019 at 16:07, Jamie John said:

 

Yeah, Blood Meridian would be quite tough to listen to, I imagine. A lot of the more poetic passages in it benefit from being read through a few times.

 

I couldn’t get on with the audiobook of Blood Meridian at all. Just for reference, I’ve previously read The Border Trilogy and count that as one of my favourite books of all time.

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14 minutes ago, Fierce Poodle said:

 

I couldn’t get on with the audiobook of Blood Meridian at all. Just for reference, I’ve previously read The Border Trilogy and count that as one of my favourite books of all time.

 

Try the print version. It's one of my favourite novels but it definitely dips into prose poetry at points. The diction and lexicon is often pretty epic, in the original sense of the word. Harold Bloom called it "The bloodiest book since The Illiad", which seems quite fitting.

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Being on holiday has meant I have, possibly only temporarily, returned to my previous book-per-week pace.

 

5. Star Wars: Thrawn Alliances - Timothy Zahn

 

I've written my thoughts on this in the Star Wars New Canon thread, so I'll just say that this is the second part of a new trilogy about one of the fan-favourite characters from the (now no longer canon) old Star Wars books, now restored to the new canon by his original creator. And it was pretty good, although not quite as good as part one. Still, I romped through it, which given my overall pace this year, is praise indeed.

 

 

 


1. The Long Walk - Richard Bachman (Stephen King)
2. The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury 
3. Interview with the Vampire - Anne Rice  
4. Neurotribes - Steve Silberman
5. Star Wars: Thrawn Alliances - Timothy Zahn

 

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13 down. Blood, Sweat and Pixels by Jason Schreier. Sure quite a few people on here will have read it but it’s a book concerned with game development. I was worried that it might prove to be overly technical and too specialised for my Luddite intellect. But it proved to be a thoroughly engaging and informative book, placing as much focus on the human impact as to the technological machinations. Each chapter centres on a particular games’ development; some more successful than others. The games range from the AAA development of Destiny to the indie production and Kickstarter financing of Hollow Knight. The author is able to speak to a large number of those involved and the reportage comes across as realistic rather than sycophantic. A really interesting and entertaining read. 

 

Spoiler

1.The Life and Rhymes of Benjamin Zephaniah

2. Borne by Jeff VanderMeer.

3. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine.

4.In your defence:Stories of Life and Law by Sarah Langford

5.My Thoughts Exactly by Lily Allen

6. Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky

7. 84k by Claire North

8. Chalk Man by C. J. Tudor

9. The Water Cure by Sarah MacIntosh

10. Journeyman by Ben Smith

11.Do you dream of Terra-Two by Temi Oh

12. The Wall by John Lanchester

13. Blood, Sweat and Pixels by Jason Schreier

 

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17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August by Claire North. Picked this up after it was recommended on here, and really glad I did as it was excellent. The concept sounded intriguing if potentially a little trashy, but in reality it was clever, thought-provoking, extremely well written and just really enjoyable throughout.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

 

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Previous

 

Spoiler

 

1. Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

2. Sea of Thieves: Athena's Fortune by Chris Allcock

3. How To Be Right in a World Gone Wrong by James O'Brien

4. Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late by Kieron Dyer with Oliver Holt

5. Our Story by Ron and Reg Kray with Fred Dineage

6. Step By Step - The Life in My Journeys by Simon Reeve

7. How Not To Be A Boy by Robert Webb

8. Cheer Up Peter Reid by Peter Reid

 

 

9. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

9780575082441-1-pdpxl.jpg

Huzzah!!  This is actually GOOD!  I really wasn't sure what to expect when I started this series, and I thought I'd start at the very beginning - this is one of 2 books of short stories before the main novels kick off.  Easy to read, amusing in parts with some cool monsters thrown in, this sort of book is perfect for a standard half hour commute and didn't take me long to get through.

 

I've not really played much of Witcher 3 but I've told myself that I MUST start it again from scratch, so when I saw this on sale I set myself the target of reading through all the novels before I return to the game.

 

I've bought the 2nd book which I'll read in a month or so (I've other books to read which I've borrowed!) and I'm looking forward to it as this introduction to Geralt, Dandelion and Yennefer left me eagerly anticipating more of the same.

 

4/5

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18. The Hobbit. I've been reading this to my 7 year-old daughter over the past couple of months. Haven't read it since I was a kid, though I've re-read Lord of the Rings several times. I really enjoyed it  - as did my daughter, albeit with the help of some on the fly amendments to story details, given that some parts were a little less child-friendly than I'd remembered.

 

I was a little surprised how much foreshadowing of LOTR stuff was in there, apart from the obvious stuff. It's made me want to have another read through, or possibly to listen to the BBC dramatisation which I loved.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

 

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Finished Absolution Gap by Alistair Reynolds

 

It's in the Revelation space universe and for me is the 3rd part of the trilogy of Revelation space, Redemption Ark and Absolution Gap(the other stories in the series seem to be almost standalone even though some are set in the same locations) and continues in that a number of significant characters, not least the Nostalgia for Infinity . It take place over three different time periods and I was initially slightly confused  as there appeared to be little crossover. Once my dim wits caught up with what was going on  it all  slotted into place and I found it a far better book than the middle entry, Redemption Ark, though thinking about that book there's some cracking sections in it too. Reynolds continues his habit of  poor characterization for some of the "bit part" players who are focused on for  significant  sections and dropped with a few lines and barely a sentence or two referencing them  in the remainder of the story.There always appear to be some forward momentum to the story  which is fitting given the setting and it's a satisfying but a bit excessively quick ending .

 

Will have to pick up Chasm city and anything else set in the universe too.

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