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Jamie John

What books did you read in 2019?

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On 17/09/2019 at 22:43, Jamie John said:

13 & 14. The Blade Itself and Before They Are Hanged, Joe Abercrombie

 

 

I'm re-reading this series because I enjoyed it so much the first time around. They really are great "low" fantasy stories. I actually prefer them to A Song of Ice and Fire, I think. They certainly don't suffer from the bloat that plagues the later books in that series, nor does the focus stray from the main cast of characters. I'm currently getting towards the end of the third book, The Last Argument of Kings, and then I'm straight on to the next trilogy in the same universe (prequels, I think), which I've not yet read. Highly recommended to anyone who likes medieval-type fantasy.

 

I'm halfway through The Blade Itself and I'm struggling a bit with it to be honest, every character’s got a name like a dropped hand of Scrabble tiles and it's structured like a TV show rather than a novel: it jumps between characters every chapter so you can’t remember who anyone was when you swing back around 100 pages later. It's all very very generic.

 

Finally I'm getting to the point where the characters are actually coming together though so hopefully it settles into a groove from this point out. As it stands though it's not exactly inspiring me to read any further books in the series.

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1 hour ago, Garwoofoo said:

 

I'm halfway through The Blade Itself and I'm struggling a bit with it to be honest, every character’s got a name like a dropped hand of Scrabble tiles and it's structured like a TV show rather than a novel: it jumps between characters every chapter so you can’t remember who anyone was when you swing back around 100 pages later. It's all very very generic.

 

Finally I'm getting to the point where the characters are actually coming together though so hopefully it settles into a groove from this point out. As it stands though it's not exactly inspiring me to read any further books in the series.

 

That's a shame. I'd suggest you stick with it as once the 'core' characters are introduced, from whose perspective the chapters are told, then Abercrombie doesn't add any more in the later books. There's Logen (aka Ninefingers/The Bloody Nine), Jezal, Glotka, Ferro, Major West and the Dogman. That's it, isn't it? I don't think it's too much of a spoiler to say that

Spoiler

some of the characters group up as the novel goes on

which might make it easier to track what's happening.

 

As fantasy novels go, however, I'd say it's pretty light on lore and back story. I certainly found it less confusing than the later ASoIAF books where I had to keep looking up people's names every chapter, and lots of the characters seemed indistinguishable from each other.

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38. Feed the Beast by John Parkin. I thought this was a bit mixed. Having gone through the football system myself as a kid I really related to much of the opening section. I also thought the book did a good job of lifting the lid on the unglamorous reality of life as a journeyman footballer, but I didn't really find the early career lad/drinking/bants stuff particularly engaging.

 

Previously:

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

 

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The Last of the Mohicans  by JF Cooper

 

 Most people probably have an idea of the plot - British colonials in America get captured by unpleasant Indians   allied with the French and  Hawkeye/ La Longue Carabine(oh matron!) and his two Indian NPCs help get them back a couple of times as they keep getting kidnapped.Basically a chase story set in and of the time. Which is part of the problem with this - it's inherently racist . Hawkeye's heritage keeps being distinguished from his two Indian companions to ensure that we're aware  a white fella is  front and centre. Uncas & Chingachgook barely get a look in character wise and   other than Magua  as the big bad there's barely any characterisation of any on the natives. Even the darker of the two sisters is basically sidelined and the "fairer" of the two is described quite often , possibly to give the male audience of the time itches in their britches.Anyway,  it's a 250 page book dragged out to 400+ pages with  unnecessary descriptions of nature/people's complexions for the nth time  etc .There's also some really daft plot armour in the latter stages of the book in relation to disguises . In saying all that , there's obviously a bit to it as it's considered a classic and sections in the 1st and middle 3rds  aren't bad.

 

The Michael Mann movie took some  liberal allowances with the plot and is probably the better for it IMO.

 

 

 

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I read that as a teenager and recall being very confused that it bore almost no relation to the film. Also something about a man dancing in a bear suit (or maybe not - it was a depressingly long time ago).

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On 27/09/2019 at 17:52, Miner Willy said:

I read that as a teenager and recall being very confused that it bore almost no relation to the film. Also something about a man dancing in a bear suit (or maybe not - it was a depressingly long time ago).

Yeah, thats the really daft plot armour I was referring to, happens twice within the space of  a few chapters and  takes what was already a pretty fantastical situation

Spoiler

in that Indians were just allowing some pleb wander round their camp as a "healer"

and extends it further.

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15. Solo: a Star Wars Story - Mur Lafferty

 

The fact that this short and easy to read novelisation of a film I enjoyed took me six weeks to plough through should tell you all you need to know about how gripping this is. I only bothered because I'm a Star Wars completist but I'm starting to wonder whether life's too short to be wasting any of it reading stuff as bland as this. Oh well. I'm on to the second book of the Three Body trilogy next so that should be a vast improvement.

 

Spoiler

1. The Long Walk - Richard Bachman (Stephen King)
2. The Martian Chronicles - Ray Bradbury 
3. Interview with the Vampire - Anne Rice  
4. Neurotribes - Steve Silberman
5. Star Wars: Thrawn Alliances - Timothy Zahn
6. The Dead Zone - Stephen King
7. The Dragon Queen - William Andrews
8. Firestarter - Stephen King
9. The Sirens of Titan - Kurt Vonnegut
10. God Emperor of Dune - Frank Herbert
11. The Song of Achilles - Madeline Miller

12. Roadwork - Richard Bachman (Stephen King)

13. The Three Body Problem - Cixin Liu

14. Cujo - Stephen King

15. Solo: a Star Wars Story - Mur Lafferty

 

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39. Fahrenheit 451. A classic I'd never read, and picked up as it was on one of the Kindle deals. I enjoyed it, though the impact is probably lessened these days by everyone knowing the premise.

 

Previously:

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

 

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4 hours ago, Miner Willy said:

39. Fahrenheit 451. A classic I'd never read, and picked up as it was on one of the Kindle deals. I enjoyed it, though the impact is probably lessened these days by everyone knowing the premise.

 

Previously:

  Reveal hidden contents

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

 

 

If you like audiobooks Tim Robbins does a reading of this on Audible, and it’s an exceptional example of the form.

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29 minutes ago, ZOK said:

 

If you like audiobooks Tim Robbins does a reading of this on Audible, and it’s an exceptional example of the form.

 

Yeah, I love Audible. Shame - I'd have liked to hear that!

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Well worth a listen in a bit when your own reading has left you - his narration is superb. I think the only one I’ve heard that’s better is Juliet Stephenson’s reading of The Golden Notebook.

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40. The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. This is a really impressive book in the way Atwood carries multiple narratives, each with their own distinct tone and feel. However, none of the narrative strands completely grabbed me, and overall I didn't enjoy it as much as her other books I've read. 

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

40. The Blind Assassin

 

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Spoiler

 

1. Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

2. Sea of Thieves: Athena's Fortune by Chris Allcock

3. How To Be Right in a World Gone Wrong by James O'Brien

4. Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late by Kieron Dyer with Oliver Holt

5. Our Story by Ron and Reg Kray with Fred Dineage

6. Step By Step - The Life in My Journeys by Simon Reeve

7. How Not To Be A Boy by Robert Webb

8. Cheer Up Peter Reid by Peter Reid

9. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

10. Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View by various authors

11. Survivor – Auschwitz, The Death March and My Fight for Freedom by Sam Pivnik

12. Daughters of the Dragon by William Andrews

13. The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz by Denis Avey

14. The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

15. Vespasian - Tribune of Rome by Robert Fabbri

16. Indianapolis by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic

17. Vespasian - Rome's Executioner by Robert Fabbri

18. This Is Going To Hurt - The Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay

19. Vespasian - False God of Rome by Robert Fabbri

20. How to Be a Footballer by Peter Crouch

21. Star Wars - Master and Apprentice by Claudia Gray

 

 

22. Vespasian - Rome's Fallen Eagle by Robert Fabbri

 

The fourth instalment of the thoroughly enjoyable Vespasian series sees the future emperor planning the invasion of Britain as legate of the II Augusta.  I think I prefer the ancient Roman politics as opposed to the battlefield action, and this one is heavily weighted to the latter.  Still incredibly fun to read but compared to the previous couple of titles, I think this one went on a bit too long - those pesky Britons didn't give up easily!

 

I do love how Robert Fabbri merges historical fact with elaborate fiction - it makes this series a real pleasure to read through.  Book 5 is loaded onto my Kindle already.

 

3.5/5

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41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Slowly working my way through the sci-fi classics. What's left to say? It's just really great.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

40. The Blind Assassin

41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

 

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Spoiler

 

1. Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky

2. Sea of Thieves: Athena's Fortune by Chris Allcock

3. How To Be Right in a World Gone Wrong by James O'Brien

4. Old Too Soon, Smart Too Late by Kieron Dyer with Oliver Holt

5. Our Story by Ron and Reg Kray with Fred Dineage

6. Step By Step - The Life in My Journeys by Simon Reeve

7. How Not To Be A Boy by Robert Webb

8. Cheer Up Peter Reid by Peter Reid

9. The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

10. Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View by various authors

11. Survivor – Auschwitz, The Death March and My Fight for Freedom by Sam Pivnik

12. Daughters of the Dragon by William Andrews

13. The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz by Denis Avey

14. The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

15. Vespasian - Tribune of Rome by Robert Fabbri

16. Indianapolis by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic

17. Vespasian - Rome's Executioner by Robert Fabbri

18. This Is Going To Hurt - The Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay

19. Vespasian - False God of Rome by Robert Fabbri

20. How to Be a Footballer by Peter Crouch

21. Star Wars - Master and Apprentice by Claudia Gray

22. Vespasian - Rome's Fallen Eagle by Robert Fabbri

 

 

23. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

 

What a delightfully written, clever and moving piece of work this is.  I was pretty much the only person I know who enjoys reading who hadn't read this yet, and I'm pleased I finally did.  Just wonderful.

 

4.5/5

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On 10/10/2019 at 22:59, Miner Willy said:

41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Slowly working my way through the sci-fi classics. What's left to say? It's just really great.

 

Previously:

 

  Reveal hidden contents

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

40. The Blind Assassin

41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

 

 

I absolutely love Philip K. Dick. I feel like he doesn't get spoken about enough. Pretty much all of his full length novels are great. If you haven't read Ubik or A Scanner Darkly yet, make sure you do.

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57 minutes ago, Timmo said:

 

I absolutely love Philip K. Dick. I feel like he doesn't get spoken about enough. Pretty much all of his full length novels are great. If you haven't read Ubik or A Scanner Darkly yet, make sure you do.

 

Thanks. I've not read either actually. Read some of his short stories years ago and thought they were great as I recall. I'm also 1/3 through The Lies of Locke Lamora now, on your recommendation.

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42. Arm of the Sphinx by Josiah Bancroft. This is the second in Bancroft's Babel series. I didn't like it as much as Senlin Ascends, but it's still an enjoyable read. 

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

40. The Blind Assassin

41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

42. Arm of the Sphinx

 

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43. The Door into Summer by Robert Heinlein. Picked this up recently as part of my sci-fi classics quest. Initially I was struck at the setup's similarity with a Phillip K Dick novel I recalled reading... then about a third in I realised said book was actually not by Philip K Dick - I've read this before, a few years back. Anyway, it's a brilliant story, fantastically written. I was completely loving it and for the most part it is one of my favourite sci-fi novels, but I did really struggle with one particular aspect of the final section.

 

Previously:

 

Spoiler

1. The Body Library by Jeff Noon

2. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

3. Enlightenment Now

4. The book of Humans

5. Little Fires Everywhere

6. Everything Under

7. The Stand

8. Roadside Picnic

9. The Retreat of Western Liberalism

10. Things Fall Apart

11. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

12. Hello World

13. All the Pretty Horses

14. The Tatooist of Auschwitz

15. Normal People

16. The Undoing Project

17. The Fifteenth Life of Harry August

18. The Hobbit

19. Six Days of War

20. The Expert System's Brother

21. All the President's Men

22. Station Eleven

23. In Order to Live

24. The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

 25. Senlin Ascends

26. Daughters of the Dragon

27. The Crossing

28. Chernobyl - History of a Catastrophe

29. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

30. The Sellout

31. The Underground Railroad

32. All the light we cannot see

33. The Railway Man

34. The Unauthorised Biography of Ezra Maas

35. The Penelopiad

36. Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

37. Rosewater

38. Feed the Beast

39. Fahrenheit 451

40. The Blind Assassin

41. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep

42. Arm of the Sphinx

43. The Door into Summer

 

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Yeah, it’s a great read but the ‘motivation’ of the main character ends up being more than a little suspect, to put it mildly!

 

But that’s one of the great things about Heinlein - anything that remotely connects with sex in his books is always just plain weird. I don’t think he can even write about marriage without it being code for kink.

 

Beyond This Horizon is probably the most ‘normal’ in that regard, and that’s odd in all sorts of other ways to compensate.

 

Heinlein is basically a magnificent nutbag.

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6 hours ago, ZOK said:

Yeah, it’s a great read but the ‘motivation’ of the main character ends up being more than a little suspect, to put it mildly!

 

But that’s one of the great things about Heinlein - anything that remotely connects with sex in his books is always just plain weird. I don’t think he can even write about marriage without it being code for kink.

 

Beyond This Horizon is probably the most ‘normal’ in that regard, and that’s odd in all sorts of other ways to compensate.

 

Heinlein is basically a magnificent nutbag.

 

Yeah, that was the troubling element. He's clearly a brilliant writer based on this - I've not read anything else by him so far. 

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2 hours ago, Miner Willy said:

 

Yeah, that was the troubling element. He's clearly a brilliant writer based on this - I've not read anything else by him so far. 

 

Really?! Read Starship Troopers immediately. Also Beyond This Horizon, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and the novella The Unpleasant Profession Of Jonathan Hoag.

 

Your post will also act as a pheromone signal that will attract @Flub here to recommend The Number Of The Beast.

 

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Does Stranger in a Strange Land still stand up today or has it dated horribly? I loved it when I was about 15.

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It’s a decent read, and nothing Heinlein has ever written isn’t a decent read of course, but not one I revisit.

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10 hours ago, ZOK said:

 

Really?! Read Starship Troopers immediately. Also Beyond This Horizon, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and the novella The Unpleasant Profession Of Jonathan Hoag.

 

Your post will also act as a pheromone signal that will attract @Flub here to recommend The Number Of The Beast.

 

 

Ok, thanks, I've noted those. Between this post and the Kindle deals this forum is single handedly destroying my recent progress towards cutting my library down to size!

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12 hours ago, ZOK said:

 

Really?! Read Starship Troopers immediately. Also Beyond This Horizon, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and the novella The Unpleasant Profession Of Jonathan Hoag.

 

Your post will also act as a pheromone signal that will attract @Flub here to recommend The Number Of The Beast.

 

 

Not just Number of the Beast either. Every Heinlein novice should also read Time Enough For Love and To Sail Beyond the Sunset. Those two are Heinlein at peak arousal.

 

Late Heinlein was a weird and often disturbing place but did give us Job so I'll allow it.

 

Don't read Farnam's Freehold though. That's just wrong. BAD HEINLEIN. I'd rub his nose in it if he wasn't dead.

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On 07/08/2019 at 07:05, Stopharage said:

@charley farley - as the resident Station Eleven fanboy I implore you to go for it. It's a really unconventional dystopian novel with a great deal of charm and heart running through it. The 2 Jeff Noon 'Nyquist' books are based on superb world building with an effective and engaging protagonist; the level of craft and ideas within are impressive. Big fan of the Senlin books too. 

 

@Stopharage And @Miner Willy

 

After working my way through The Stone Sky, Children of Time, The Hod King and The Hunger Games I've just finished Station Eleven and I absolutely loved it. I've read some really great stuff this year, but this (along with the 3 Senlin books) has been my favourite. I love it so, so much. Thanks both for the recommendation.

 

A Natural History next, then Uprooted and then the 2 Nyquist books.

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6 hours ago, charley farley said:

 

@Stopharage And @Miner Willy

 

After working my way through The Stone Sky, Children of Time, The Hod King and The Hunger Games I've just finished Station Eleven and I absolutely loved it. I've read some really great stuff this year, but this (along with the 3 Senlin books) has been my favourite. I love it so, so much. Thanks both for the recommendation.

 

A Natural History next, then Uprooted and then the 2 Nyquist books.

 

Good to hear!

 

I just read Arm of the Spinx and didn't like it as much as Senlin Ascends. I'll definitely read the third, but I wondered which was your favourite of the three?

 

I really loved Children of Time too. I've got the follow-up slowly approaching the top of my next read list.

 

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12 hours ago, Miner Willy said:

 

Good to hear!

 

I just read Arm of the Spinx and didn't like it as much as Senlin Ascends. I'll definitely read the third, but I wondered which was your favourite of the three?

 

I really loved Children of Time too. I've got the follow-up slowly approaching the top of my next read list.

 

 

Senlin Ascends has the advantage of opening into this new world that's all wonder and amazement like any first book/film in a series which anything coming after can't match, but I agree it's also the best aside from that as it clips along at a pace that neither of the others can match. I will say though that Arm of the Sphinx feels more like the middle entry in a trilogy - a lot more plot actually happens in The Hod King, but I really liked the slower paced world building and especially

 

Spoiler

All the bits once they made it to the Sphinx's lair even if the plot stalled somewhat.

 

I wasn't exactly, not sure if disappointed is the right word - maybe underwhelmed with Children of Time. I did like it but I was expecting something more. I suspect due to the universal positive praise I've seen it get. I was expecting something really amazing and though there were some great ideas in there it never came together for me for some reason. I'll definitely get the sequel when it's out in paperback though.

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