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Open source Gadot engine: will it have an impact?


Stevie
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The competition, primarily Unreal Engine and Unity have the advantage of a massive headstart and massive developer adoption, even giving shit away for free usually doesn't sway most people, unless they plan to do an Epic and muscle their way into the engine business with some financial support packages to interested developers tired of the duopoly.

 

I found an indie developer testimonial for why they used it, never heard of the game in question:

 

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And then, a new underdog appeared in town, the Godot Engine. It's development started back in 2007 as a proprietary engine and got open-sourced in the 2014. That's 10 years in the making showing how mature it is.

 

When we discovered it we felt that it had the potential to be everything I was searching and Rock Milk needed. We build Reakt as a laboratory to define a production workflow for our studio and put Godot to the test. We ended up loving it SO MUCH because every weak spot that we’ve found in other engines were better addressed on it.

 

 

They certainly make it sound pretty good for indie developers, no taxes to pay and it's practically useful.

 

https://medium.com/rock-milk/why-godot-engine-e0d4736d6eb0

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1 hour ago, mushashi said:

The competition, primarily Unreal Engine and Unity have the advantage of a massive headstart and massive developer adoption, even giving shit away for free usually doesn't sway most people

Most of these things were said about Blender back in the day and while it's still not reached the market share of its paid for peers, it's got a very experienced userbase who are getting some seriously top end results from it.

 

This may develop in the same way, there's always room for competition, especially if it's free.

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On 23/03/2019 at 19:26, cubik said:

Most of these things were said about Blender back in the day and while it's still not reached the market share of its paid for peers, it's got a very experienced userbase who are getting some seriously top end results from it.

 

This may develop in the same way, there's always room for competition, especially if it's free.

 

Yes but.. at the point of entry Unreal and Unity are also free, and have thousands of pages of example code/documentation all over the web.

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Yeah it deploys to them fine but doesn't have a lot of the features that are pretty standard practice when making mobile games natively so if I want them I have to implement myself for all targeted platforms which isn't something that interests me especially when unity it's a couple of clicks and done.

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It's 34MB, it's worth playing with. I've been using it for a while as I've been doing some deving on a low spec laptop. The documentation is piss poor, there's not a massive amount of help out there, but for indie development it's pretty damn good and improving all the time. The scripting language is esentially python, but it also has support for C and C#

 

It just doesn't currently have the bells and whistles to compete with UE or Unity, and has yet to have a product come out as a proof of concept. But I'd gladly recomend it to anyone starting out as an alternative to frameworks like Love2D

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50 minutes ago, partious said:

 

What are the benefits of using godot instead of Love2D for simple 2d games and vice versa?

 

Godot is actually an engine, where as Love is a framework of libraries where you still have to do most of the programming yourself.

 

The benefits of using Love are, well... Someone help me out here.

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1 hour ago, Pixelbark said:

 

Godot is actually an engine, where as Love is a framework of libraries where you still have to do most of the programming yourself.

 

The benefits of using Love are, well... Someone help me out here.

 

The benefit of using Love is that for simple 2D stuff  you don't have layers upon layers of cludgy shit in between you and doing the programming yourself.

 

It's not a practical approach for 3D games or bigger dev teams, but for some old school bedroom coding I massively prefer just having an IDE and coding everything from scratch, making my own tools etc. Last time I looked at Unity (admittedly a few years back now) it wouldn't even let me draw directly to the frame buffer and you had to jump through hoops just to get pixel art to display cleanly without aliasing. I hate not having that level of control.

 

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