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PlayStation 5 - Next gen is here!


Eighthours
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There was a "leak" on reddit a few months back that was very accurate with the info given out today. It stated that the price they were aiming for was 500 dollars with sony losing quite a bit per console (no surprise).

 As for the ray tracing stuff well any card with a compute unit on it can do ray tracing, it's just incredibly expensive to do it. For AMD to do it with a Navi GPU you would see framerates have to drop along with resolution, it's just a fact of how ray tracing works.

 

Remember ray tracing is allowed at the driver level on DX12. There was a recent Crytek demo shown with ray tracing running on a Vega 56.

 The reason Nvidia made a big thing about it is that their cards have a specific capability to drastically speed up how ray tracing is calculated. 

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28 minutes ago, Robo_1 said:

This seems like an odd way to announce the console, almost the exact opposite of the flash and sizzle of their dedicated PS4 event. It all sounds very promising though, the SSD speed seems like a genuine game changer and it's bringing the specs to match. I don't know much about PC graphics cards, but I'm assuming any card made on a 7nm process is cutting edge, smoking fat stuff.

The only 7nm GPU available today is the AMD Vega VII. Which is slower than the 2 year old and 16nm Nvidia 1080ti. 

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11 minutes ago, TehStu said:

Stupid question - can you spend less resources on assets (programming shaders and what have you) if you're raytracing? I've paid no attention to its application to games, my knowledge dates back to playing around with raytracers in DOS.

Yes but with a maybe. As with all techniques, there are benefits and costs. The benefits are obvious, proper lighting, shadows, Global illumination etc. Problem is this all costs power and you have to try and balance the effect it has on a game. So you will still get people faking some effects with rasterization in order to keep resolution and framerates up. 

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1 minute ago, pulsemyne said:

Yes but with a maybe. As with all techniques, there are benefits and costs. The benefits are obvious, proper lighting, shadows, Global illumination etc. Problem is this all costs power and you have to try and balance the effect it has on a game. So you will still get people faking some effects with rasterization in order to keep resolution and framerates up. 

Interesting. Looking forward to seeing what smaller devs do with raytracing and game styles which are less computationally intensive anyway. 

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Will also support current PSVR, a future version of which is heavily implied but not yet being revealed.

 

Literally the only aspect of this that interests me


Not a PS vs Xbox thing, it's the same problem all over - loads more horses to draw more stuff and yet still be limited by the same archaic playing interface

 

I do still think the evolution of hardware is the enemy of exploring how to be more creative with content in games, rather than a facilitator, so I just groan when new hardware announcements surface

 

But the exception is VR, while I'll admit I don't spend a huge amount of timing playing VR games, it's the biggest genuine leap in possibilities since 3D, hindered by an insanely clunky interface and a lack of games support as a result

 

Desperately hope they've got something up their sleeve that is a genuine game changer. 

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1 minute ago, linkster said:

But the exception is VR, while I'll admit I don't spend a huge amount of timing playing VR games, it's the biggest genuine leap in possibilities since 3D, hindered by an insanely clunky interface and a lack of games support as a result

 

 

Lack of games support for PSVR? Wut?

 

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15 minutes ago, bear said:

AMD and Intel both support technologies where you can run an SSD alongside a HDD and have them basically act as a hybrid drive. No reason that can't be done on a PS5/Xbox2020. 

This is what worried me about a hybrid approach, because if that relies on a specific drive then external options are immediately more expensive. The above makes total sense though, if we can cache on the expensive one and then have the bulk of the games sat on the bigger external.

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1 minute ago, linkster said:

Relatively speaking. I'm a fan of it, I've got quite a few (Rez, Resident Evil, the dinosaur one, Moss, some puzzle games) but it's still a drop in the ocean

There's literally hundreds of games for it.  I would say the game support is amazing considering the niche appeal and number of unit sales. And this year it has been the focus for Sony.

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I'm really excited about what getting a new CPU architecture in consoles is going to mean for gaming. Jaguar, which powers both the Bone and PS4, is basically a laptop CPU. From a period of time when AMD was lagging behind Intel hugely, at that. Having an eight-core Ryzen 2 chip in there is going to be a ridiculous leap.

 

Ray tracing I'm not so sold on, by comparison. Even the best PC graphics cards struggle to offer a good experience with ray traced graphics. In a year and a half's time, will the tech have advanced much? Plus there is the need to fit into the lower power / heat budget of a console too. Seems too early for it.

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38 minutes ago, Revival said:

I really don't see the point of going the expensive SSD route, Lots of us now have large digital collections plus people will now have access to their PS4 content. It's bound to launch with a 1TB SSD and the reality is it'd be more forward thinking if we started to see 4TB standard(ish) drives as standard so you have space for everything.

 

 

 

Seems that the point is to completely solve the load times problems of this gen and vastly improve open world streaming capabilities. So it's key to console performance, not a storage thing - it will potentially transform what can be done in videogames. I'm pretty excited about the possibilities.

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7 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

Seems that the point is to completely solve the load times problems of this gen and vastly improve open world streaming capabilities. So it's key to console performance, not a storage thing - it will potentially transform what can be done in videogames. I'm pretty excited about the possibilities.

Yeah, it'll effectively do what harddrives did as we shifted from optical discs. Total bottleneck that needs to be overcome.

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51 minutes ago, Revival said:

I really don't see the point of going the expensive SSD route, Lots of us now have large digital collections plus people will now have access to their PS4 content. It's bound to launch with a 1TB SSD and the reality is it'd be more forward thinking if we started to see 4TB standard(ish) drives as standard so you have space for everything.

 

 

 

You don't really need space for everything. I've got a 2tb in my PS4 and far too many games installed.

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I’m at the stage with the PS4 that I was with the 360... love the machine and whatever comes next will be day one purchase, supporting the current pSVR makes it even more of a sure thing and even a Microsoft e3 level reveal is unlikely to change my buying choice. There is one thing that will be a deal breaker tho...

 

Spoiler

Lack of multiple USB ports on the back of the console

 

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2 minutes ago, MW_Jimmy said:

 

You don't really need space for everything. I've got a 2tb in my PS4 and far too many games installed.

PS5 games are liable to be much bigger in size. Usually its a factor of 10 per generation. Whether that will hold for next gen will remains to be seen

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11 minutes ago, Eighthours said:

 

Seems that the point is to completely solve the load times problems of this gen and vastly improve open world streaming capabilities. So it's key to console performance, not a storage thing - it will potentially transform what can be done in videogames. I'm pretty excited about the possibilities.

 

Is this a common experience?, I've been using a USB 3.0 External drive (7200rpm) for the last two to three years and can honestly say I've had any load time problems this gen (on Xbox anyway) everything is nice and responsive. It's not even something I've thought about as an issue.

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22 minutes ago, Liamness said:

I'm really excited about what getting a new CPU architecture in consoles is going to mean for gaming. Jaguar, which powers both the Bone and PS4, is basically a laptop CPU. From a period of time when AMD was lagging behind Intel hugely, at that. Having an eight-core Ryzen 2 chip in there is going to be a ridiculous leap.

 

Ray tracing I'm not so sold on, by comparison. Even the best PC graphics cards struggle to offer a good experience with ray traced graphics. In a year and a half's time, will the tech have advanced much? Plus there is the need to fit into the lower power / heat budget of a console too. Seems too early for it.

It'll be immense. Ryzen 3000 is going to be a damn good chip. Hell Zen and Zen+ are great chips.

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I mean the article talked about a load timing dropping from 15 seconds to 0.8 seconds. When I upgraded my PC late last year and went from a standard HDD to an SSD the difference is absolutely huge and I could never go back. Playing Horizon 4 on my Xbox S and then switching over to my PC is a world of difference when it comes to loading.

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24 minutes ago, Liamness said:

I'm really excited about what getting a new CPU architecture in consoles is going to mean for gaming. Jaguar, which powers both the Bone and PS4, is basically a laptop CPU. From a period of time when AMD was lagging behind Intel hugely, at that. Having an eight-core Ryzen 2 chip in there is going to be a ridiculous leap.

 

Ray tracing I'm not so sold on, by comparison. Even the best PC graphics cards struggle to offer a good experience with ray traced graphics. In a year and a half's time, will the tech have advanced much? Plus there is the need to fit into the lower power / heat budget of a console too. Seems too early for it.

Ray tracing is awesome, especially on metro exodus. The drivers are being improved all the time as are techniques for denoising etc.  

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1 minute ago, Purin said:

Sony are going to Dreamcast the fuck out of the next Xbox. The hype for PS5 is going to be unlike anything we've seen, this is the start.

 

However great the next Xbox will be, and I'm sure it will be, Sony are going to be hyping the PS5 as the god-machine Xbox killer.

 

Exciting times!

Like PS3 then.

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6 minutes ago, Stanley said:

Like PS3 then.

 

As funny as that conference was I just can't believe they'd be that out of touch again.  They've been pretty good this gen no matter how far ahead they've got (apart from the cross play stuff).   

Can't wait for E3 now to see if MS have a similar sort of console in terms of power.  I'd imagine they probably will.    

then onto xmas 2019 or spring 2020 to see the first one out of the blocks.      

I say now that I won't buy a launch comnsole till people on here say they're not jet engines with fan noise but I suspect I'll crumble fairly quickly. 

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