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Streaming service costs!


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4 hours ago, Hitcher said:

I think you're wrong they'll never go yearly because that would a sure fire way to lose subscribers.

 

In fact all of these services need to keep the costs relatively low to be able to compete.

 

Virgin, Sky, phone, mobile, broadband, even magazines - all have yearly (or biannual even!) “contracts”. I can see streaming services do the same.

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On 14/07/2019 at 18:53, deKay said:

 

Virgin, Sky, phone, mobile, broadband, even magazines - all have yearly (or biannual even!) “contracts”. I can see streaming services do the same.

 

And now you can add textbooks to that list:

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-48998789

 

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Pearson said students would only be able to rent physical textbooks from now on, and they would be updated much less frequently.

 

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He added: "For the Netflix and Spotify generation, they expect to rent not own."

 

Fuck sake.

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More bad news for Netflix

 

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shares plunged as much as 12% to $320.30 in New York Thursday, tumbling toward the worst one-day drop in three years, after the company reported a loss of 130,000 customers in the U.S. Netflix blamed higher prices and a weak slate of TV shows. It signed up 2.8 million subscribers internationally in the period, roughly half what the company predicted.

 

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  • 10 months later...

HBO Max have decided to do what Disney seem to have given up doing. Rotating movie releases. For now, it appears to be DC movies, with some leaving the service in July and being replaced with others. The departing ones will reappear at some point in future. Seems even more pointless than when Disney did it with physical releases. It's not like there's limited shelf space.

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2 hours ago, JohnC said:

HBO Max have decided to do what Disney seem to have given up doing. Rotating movie releases. For now, it appears to be DC movies, with some leaving the service in July and being replaced with others. The departing ones will reappear at some point in future. Seems even more pointless than when Disney did it with physical releases. It's not like there's limited shelf space.

 

It's to stop people paying for a couple of months, watching everything, then cancelling. They now need to come back in the future and pay again.

 

I reckon it's only a matter of time before 12 month contracts (rather than monthly) on these services happen.

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I'm not so sure its a good idea. I got a year's sub to Disney+ and who knows if I will continue.  But its attraction is that I know it will have everything I want whenever I want it.  Not knowing if a movie I want is going to be on or not is a massive minus.  The constant disappearing of content is a major irritation with both Amazon and Netflix and almost make them try before you buy services if you want assured constant access to a specific film or series. 

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On 19/07/2019 at 11:26, gospvg said:

Britbox has been announced at £5.99 per month

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-49037855

 

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Asked why viewers should pay an extra charge to watch shows originally funded by the licence fee, Lord Hall compared BritBox with releasing a programme on DVD. "That was the BBC saying, there's a secondary market - you pay for content after we've shown it," he said. "This is just a modern-day version of that, and an even better version of that, because it used to be infuriating when you'd seen a programme on the BBC and you couldn't get hold of the DVD." Any money the corporation makes will be put back in to programme-making, he said. "I think this is wins all round for the licence fee payers."

 

Bollocks. Lots of manufacture and distro costs associated with DVDs, you would buy them and watch them forever, you could borrow them off friends, plus you could sell them on or re-buy for a fraction of the cost down the line. With Britbox you're renting, if the shows can be hosted on iPlayer and watched by those who pay the license fee then charging for it later is just taking the piss. Admit it, Lord Hall, it's about double-dipping and taking back control of the content from the second-hand market. Oh and "ploughing the money back into programme-making", what, so you can charge us again to watch it later? 

 

But as has been mentioned young people today are all about subscriptions and renting, not owning shelves full of stuff. The BBC and co are biding their time until we're history and they can charge in perpetuity for things we could buy outright. 

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22 hours ago, Vimster said:

 

 

Bollocks. Lots of manufacture and distro costs associated with DVDs, you would buy them and watch them forever, you could borrow them off friends, plus you could sell them on or re-buy for a fraction of the cost down the line. With Britbox you're renting, if the shows can be hosted on iPlayer and watched by those who pay the license fee then charging for it later is just taking the piss. Admit it, Lord Hall, it's about double-dipping and taking back control of the content from the second-hand market. Oh and "ploughing the money back into programme-making", what, so you can charge us again to watch it later? 

 

But as has been mentioned young people today are all about subscriptions and renting, not owning shelves full of stuff. The BBC and co are biding their time until we're history and they can charge in perpetuity for things we could buy outright. 

 

The BBC are only allowed to keep shows on iPlayer for a certain period of time. It has recently been extended but blame the lawmakers for the rules. They have to charge for their shows outside of that period as otherwise it's considered an unfair advantage over the competition.

 

They can explain the reasons in whichever way they want - but that's the real reason behind them charging for their back catalogue.

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Another alternative to subscription fatigue I'd just to download the shows or movies you want. I use Usenet and just grab the content I want rather than having to choose from whatever content a sub service had in its licence portfolio at the time.

 

Queue up a series on sabnzb or similar and then binge away. 

 

Amazes me people will subscribe to a service just for one show like sheep.

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17 minutes ago, new666uk said:

Another alternative to subscription fatigue I'd just to download the shows or movies you want. I use Usenet and just grab the content I want rather than having to choose from whatever content a sub service had in its licence portfolio at the time.

 

Queue up a series on sabnzb or similar and then binge away. 

 

Amazes me people will subscribe to a service just for one show like sheep.

A while ago it was brought home to me how, thanks to Netflix et al, piracy is at an all-time low especially in the west. In 2004 I remember reading a story that 35% of net traffic was BitTorrent on one ISP alone. Some people at work use Kodi boxes and have them set up by "my dad's mate" or whatever, but there was a golden period for Netflix about 2011-2015 where there wasn't much competition, you could use a VPN and get the most out of streaming. Maybe we'll see a rise in piracy again if all these services keep trying to fragment the market.

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5 hours ago, Tony said:

 

The BBC are only allowed to keep shows on iPlayer for a certain period of time. It has recently been extended but blame the lawmakers for the rules. They have to charge for their shows outside of that period as otherwise it's considered an unfair advantage over the competition.

 

They can explain the reasons in whichever way they want - but that's the real reason behind them charging for their back catalogue.

I'd suggest then the BBC has its own service where license-fee payers can log in and watch BBC content in the same way Netflix lets people watch Netflix content. I know the BBC were thinking of making it so you had to enter your license ID into iPlayer at one point, not sure what happened there. I'd happily do that and say I'm paying £14 a month in license fee if I can have access to a ton of BBC-produced content.

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12 hours ago, Vimster said:

A while ago it was brought home to me how, thanks to Netflix et al, piracy is at an all-time low especially in the west. In 2004 I remember reading a story that 35% of net traffic was BitTorrent on one ISP alone. Some people at work use Kodi boxes and have them set up by "my dad's mate" or whatever, but there was a golden period for Netflix about 2011-2015 where there wasn't much competition, you could use a VPN and get the most out of streaming. Maybe we'll see a rise in piracy again if all these services keep trying to fragment the market.

 

Yep, we used to have a Kodi set-up on our Shield TV five years ago. But when 'most stuff was on Netflix' we stopped bothering with it (updating builds and changing builds was a faff). Then Amazon came and we added that. Now Disney. Then HBO.. 

 

Now we've installed some simple dodgy apk's like Cinema HD and Viva TV on the Shield TV which automatically update themselves, add new links as old ones disappear etc. Way simpler to set up than Kodi. You can make one watchlist via Trakt, rather than having to flip between Netflix, HBO, Disney, Prime etc etc.

 

We still have subscriptions to three legit services but are using them less and less.

 

I'm sure we're not alone in doing this.

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