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Jo jo rabbit - new Taika Waititi movie

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Mark Kermode too. 
 

When I mentioned having seen it to a couple of friends, they said, “is that the one that’s been panned?”  It breaks my heart that shit reviews are stopping people from seeing this. 

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Yeah, I really don't get the multiple negative reviews either. It's like the critics all got scared.

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Clueless hacks. I doubt I'll see a better film this year. It's fantastic.

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I don't think reviews stop people seeing films. And I'd rather reviewers were honest.

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Oh sure, I want them to be honest. I guess I don't see why there's this critical consensus that Jojo is confused, or not mean enough about Nazis or whatever it is, even from people that enjoy his previous works.

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For all it's worth I think that Telegraph review could be replaced by one of the comments on it.

Quote

More crap from the la-la socialistsloonies... Vote with your wallet... Give them nothing..

 

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Robbie Collin's response to this film is surprisingly short-sighted. It's as if he doesn't understand the use of different lenses in art, and only certain kinds of WW2 film should be made.

 

It also comes across as a little insincere. Like he knows that people get upset by trivilisation of topics, but doesn't really get why. But he's giving it a shot anyway.

 

Anyway, it's brilliant. I loved it. Waititi can (still) do no wrong in my eyes.

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3 hours ago, Rumspringa said:

For all it's worth I think that Telegraph review could be replaced by one of the comments on it.

 

Jesus, imagine your takeaway of a movie about an innocent child rejecting the (historically real) propaganda of Nazi Germany being "Those soft lefties are talking nonsense again."

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This is brilliant - I was up at Glastonbury Tor this morning to see dawn break so by the time I was back in Bristol to see this flick I was very tired and emotional I guess.

 

Or maybe it was just a dusty cinema.

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On 18/01/2020 at 12:24, Popo said:

That was so subtle I thought I imagined it. Were there other clues?


They telegraphed throughout most of the movie - it wasn’t subtle at all.

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It's a great and fitting sub-plot that flew over me.

 

Spoiler

I just thought them flamboyant and sensitive, which it obviously at odds with the Nazi regime and fits well in terms of the absurdity of everything that's going. I didn't twig their relationship, which having read up on it afterwards is revealed in their asides and body language... I really wasn't paying full attention.

 

I also read afterward that the crazy bondage-camp outfit Klenzendorf designs and wears has some historical accuracy - it's got similar pink triangles to ones that homosexual men were forced to wear in German death camps.

 

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Critics on the whole seem to have totally misunderstood this film. It's weird. I think they were expecting some sort of Iannuci-ish satire? 

 

It's sort of like how critics hated The Witcher for not being Game of Thrones. 

 

On the other hand, loads of them are raving about 1917, a spectacular technical showpiece but a war film which lacks emotional impact and is devoid of anything to say and ends up feeling like a modern AAA video game. 

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Saw this last night. Loved it and so did the daughter. Can’t remember the last time I laughed out loud at the cinema. Slightly dusty in my cinema though, especially when you realise 

Spoiler

The shoes are Jojo’s mums


Five Heil Hitlers out of Five

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On 19/01/2020 at 16:16, schmojo said:

Robbie Collin's response to this film is surprisingly short-sighted. It's as if he doesn't understand the use of different lenses in art, and only certain kinds of WW2 film should be made.

 

 

He was also a massive dick to Edith Bowman on the show, completely shutting her down, very much like this:

 

oCYKxMU2LCI4.gif

 

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Watched it this evening. It’s a wonderful film. Beautifully crafted throughout, with the right balance of humour and really quite dark imagery (for a 12A)

 

Earns it emotional scenes, especially *that* one, which drew shocked gasps in the screening I was in.
 

Spoiler

The quote at the end:

Let everything happen to you
Beauty and terror
Just keep going
No feeling is final

- Ranier Marie Rilke


That got me. You don’t need to hear exactly why here, but fucking hell, what a beautifully poignant sentiment to end on.

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On 19/01/2020 at 18:39, deerokus said:

Critics on the whole seem to have totally misunderstood this film. It's weird. I think they were expecting some sort of Iannuci-ish satire? 

 

It's sort of like how critics hated The Witcher for not being Game of Thrones. 

 

On the other hand, loads of them are raving about 1917, a spectacular technical showpiece but a war film which lacks emotional impact and is devoid of anything to say and ends up feeling like a modern AAA video game. 

 

It was pitched in the marketing as an 'anti-hate satire', which seems to have thrown people. Waititi himself described it as a 'weird art comedy' which is a bit closer, but it's very much in keeping with the tone of his previous work - just inevitably a little darker because of the historical context. 

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Well I thought this was superb. I have to admit, based on some of the reviews I approached this with some cynicism, but it was perfectly judged and the tone was very consistent. Fantastic performances and beautifully written and directed. I had no idea it would be that evocative either! I was a mess by the end of the film! So glad I ignored the reviews on this!

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Bit late to this but I would urge anyone to go see this before it reaches the end of its run!

I brought my 9 year old, LOL. No regrets - at the Hitler Youth camp bit he did say out loud "that looks SO COOL" though I like to think he was back on message by the end. The fact it's entirely from the view of a 10 year old does a lot to take the edge off the darkness of it, they captured the mindset of a young boy really, really well. Might not recommend it for a more sensitive child, but hey better they learn about war from something like this before they learn it from CoD.

 

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Saw this on a flight.  It was brilliant with some really nuanced performances in there.  Waititi's Hitler becoming darker and more malign as JoJo's innocence is stripped away is actually very fine work.

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A good kick in the arse for Todd "You can't do comedy anymore- everyone's too 'woke'" Phillips as Waititi wins Oscar for a comedy film starring a semi-Maori Hitler.

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I've not seen Parasite so it could be really good, but I was secretly hoping this would win Best Picture. 

 

Scarlett didn't win best supporting actress which I'm OK about, Roman Griffin Davis didn't get a nomination for leading actor which probably makes sense.  Considering his age I thought he was excellent but that's probably not justification for a nomination. 

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Just on the way back from this and am really happy to see not only a thread full of people praising it, but also kicking the shit out of Bradshaw and Collin for simply not understanding what the film is going for; 
 

 

Jojo Rabbit isn’t a Satire of Nazi Germany. It’s touted as an Anti-Hate Satire, not an Anti-Nazi Satire. The whole point of the thing is to ask the question “why would people hate?” In Jojo’s case it’s the uniforms, the friends, the glorification of the invincible leader who eats unicorns and jumps out of windows. Because he’s a ten year old boy and that's how you indoctrinate ten year old boys. 
 

When Robbie Collin says that the satire doesn’t work because everyone believes Jews have horns and are evil and that's ridiculous, he’s again missed the point. The reason Rebel Wilson is telling an audience of ten year olds that Jewish people can read minds etc can be seen in two ways. 
 

1. they are ten year olds and this is the kind of thing that will build them into hating. Jojo hasn’t learned to be the way he is just through posters; stimulus comes from a number of places. Look at parents telling their kids over the dinner table that “foreigners steal all our jobs” and “there’s no room in hospital because of all of the immigrants”, shit regurgitated that makes kids build these opinions over time. 
 

2. she’s representative of another way that this kind of thing spreads. Via stupidity. All of the stories she repeats are about members of her family but they always sound like retellings rather than things she's directly experienced. So maybe she’s thick, and gets told this nonsense by her father about cousins etc, then tells an audience full of ten year olds who believe it to be fact because it’s come “from an adult.” 

 

Sam Rockwell's character isn't a "stupid Nazi that takes away from how evil everything was" because the whole idea is that to ten year olds in Nazi Germany these people weren't evil. They were Mum's friend and the guy down at the Scout Hut and the source of all of these kid's information. The very things that colour who they are as people. It just so happens that the Scout Hut in question is teaching kids to hate Jewish people and throw Grenades. Then you add in that he's a closeted homosexual that's being forced to fight for the Nazis because what the fuck else is he going to do and it adds another layer to that person. 

 
 

 

 

I believe Collin’s heart is in the right place. He’s sat down and listened to the description "Anti Hate Movie" and heard "Anti Nazi Movie" and that slight misunderstanding has coloured his reading of the film.He can drop all of the speaking over Edith Bowman and that "lalalalalalala no you're wrong I'm a film critic" bullshit that's in the 5 live review because it's rude and it's shitty and it's that attitude that's stopped him understanding the movie in the first place. 

 

Bradshaw on the other hand can go and sit on a big spike. It's clear from his review he's made no attempt to engage what's in front of him and has basically gone "No thank you" and written out the plot of the thing and not really formed any arguments. He's a terrible critic that's way out of touch with pretty much everything he comes into contact with. 

 

I'm in no way anti-critic. I think a lot of Kermode's points can be taken on board, I didn't find it particularly funny and think it's got some slightly slow pacing in the middle third. But it's such a wonderful message told so cleverly that.. well... I think a lot of critics trying to be cleverer than it just sort of missed it. And that's a shame because it's a really special thing that should be shown in schools up and down the country. 

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