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Unintentionally hilarious moments in film


Monkeyboy
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No clips, but the other day I watched Daylight on ITV2, and laughed throughout.  Stallone has loads of lines of dialogue that really don't fit with the rest of the script, and they all seem to be crowbarred in to give him some opportunities to show he really can act.  Thing is, he can't and when you spot these lines they are fantastic.

 

"Frank, it's two hours....  It's two hours, Frank"

 

"Breath Frank! In! Out! In! Out! Don't die on me!"

 

"I just need some time to figure it out.  Just some time.  Just(unintelligible)frank"

 

Can;t put it across in a forum post, but it's on TV more often than the news, well worth a look.

 

 

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On 26/08/2019 at 20:46, Monkeyboy said:

Watched an eighties movie I'd never heard of tonight (John Carpenter was one of the writers!), Black Moon Rising, starring Tommy Lee Jones. Anyway, there's a bit where a deaf guys gets runs over, that made me chuckle. I'm not sure that was the intention. His buddy's reaction at the end is priceless.

 

 

That's awesome. Run over by a trampoline.

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There’s a scene at the start of The Kings of Summer (a pretty good coming of age story) where widower Nick Offerman is trying to get his teen son Nick Robinson (the kid from Jurassic World, not the Tory journalist) out of the shower so he can get ready for work, yelling and cursing at him and so on. Finally the teenage boy leaves the bathroom, naked. His dad watches him as he passes and then sighs:

”He’s got his mother’s fanny”

 

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On 26/08/2019 at 23:04, John Edward Gammell said:

 

 

So TWBB is my favourite film, this year I went to see it on the big screen for the first time at The Prince Charles and a weird thing happened. I've always seen the movie as a study of capitolism, a drama about humanity and parenting put against the backdrop of the oil trade. At The Prince Charles it played more like a knockabout comedy, and it was completely brilliant in that way too. 

 

Like, Daniel Day Lewis gives my favourite performance ever in this movie. He's so remarkably over the top and evil and such a sheer bastard that you often find yourself laughing out of awkwardness. The I Drink Your Milkshake scene is amazing because he's so theatrically destroying this man's life. It's like that all the way through, and you get a real sense that this was sort of what they were aiming for if you listen to PTA on Adam Buxton's podcast. This "outtake" also kind of hints that they found the whole thing completely over the top funny. 

 

 

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I always assumed Paul Thomas Anderson was this austere cineaste kind of guy, who’d look at you askance if you didn’t pick up on his visual allusions to Italian telefon bianchi films of the 1930s, but on the basis of that Adam Buxton interview, he seems like he’s a funny, likeable guy making comedy films, like Kevin Smith or Adam McKay, except he’s just massively better at it than they are. 

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28 minutes ago, K said:

I always assumed Paul Thomas Anderson was this austere cineaste kind of guy, who’d look at you askance if you didn’t pick up on his visual allusions to Italian telefon bianchi films of the 1930s, but on the basis of that Adam Buxton interview, he seems like he’s a funny, likeable guy making comedy films, like Kevin Smith or Adam McKay, except he’s just massively better at it than they are. 

 

I watched Phantom Thread a few days ago, and I was expecting a fairly intense, ponderous film. Especially since it's impossible not to look at Daniel Day Lewis playing an artist obsessed with perfection in his craft to the exclusion of all else, and not speculate on how much it might be autobiographical.

 

So it surprised me that there are moments in the film of humour, absurdity, and lightheartedness. It's not exactly uproariously funny, but it's far from the relentlessly serious magnum opus I expected.

 

That continues on the DVD, which has a bonus feature - unused footage from the fashion show scene - that's narrated by Adam Buxton using his posh newsreel announcer voice. (I haven't listened to Adam's podcast episodes with Anderson and Jonny Greenwood yet.)

 

The DVD also has a bonus feature showing assorted lighting/camera tests, with optional Paul Thomas Anderson audio commentary. But then at the end (at 6:20 in the YouTube version below) he tags on two takes of a scene that appears to be part of principal photography, and seems to be at least partially scripted... but I can't imagine how it would have fitted into the film!

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Nick R said:

 

I watched Phantom Thread a few days ago, and I was expecting a fairly intense, ponderous film. Especially since it's impossible not to look at Daniel Day Lewis playing an artist obsessed with perfection in his craft to the exclusion of all else, and not speculate on how much it might be autobiographical.

 

So it surprised me that there are moments in the film of humour, absurdity, and lightheartedness. It's not exactly uproariously funny, but it's far from the relentlessly serious magnum opus I expected.

 

That continues on the DVD, which has a bonus feature - unused footage from the fashion show scene - that's narrated by Adam Buxton using his posh newsreel announcer voice. (I haven't listened to Adam's podcast episodes with Anderson and Jonny Greenwood yet.)

 

The DVD also has a bonus feature showing assorted lighting/camera tests, with optional Paul Thomas Anderson audio commentary. But then at the end (at 6:20 in the YouTube version below) he tags on two takes of a scene that appears to be part of principal photography, and seems to be at least partially scripted... but I can't imagine how it would have fitted into the film!

 

 

 

I thought Phantom Thread was genuinely hilarious in places. The scene where he's ordering that insane breakfast had me in stitches, as did little random stuff like Day Lewis saying hello to his staff (who have names like 'Biddy' and 'Nana'). I dunno why I found that so funny, but it really amused me.

 

Definitely listen to the Adam Buxton interview. Not only does it reveal PTA to be a surprisingly chilled guy, it also made me revise my opinion of Daniel Day Lewis. I'd assumed he was a humourless guy who took himself so seriously it was impossible to have any kind of normal conversation with him, but it sounds like he's fully on board with PTA making a comedy, and seems to have intended for his characters in Phantom Thread and TWBB to be at least partly comic. He sounds like he's hard work, but more fun than you would think. 

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Phantom Thread is a film that just keeps on giving the more you think about it.

 

Back on topic: Tim Burton's Planet of the Apes is a treasure trove of unintentional hilarity. Especially when Mark Wahlburg is the only actor panting while they run through the jungle.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 27 August 2019 at 11:13, dumpster said:

No clips, but the other day I watched Daylight on ITV2, and laughed throughout.  Stallone has loads of lines of dialogue that really don't fit with the rest of the script, and they all seem to be crowbarred in to give him some opportunities to show he really can act.  Thing is, he can't and when you spot these lines they are fantastic.

 

"Frank, it's two hours....  It's two hours, Frank"

 

"Breath Frank! In! Out! In! Out! Don't die on me!"

 

"I just need some time to figure it out.  Just some time.  Just(unintelligible)frank"

 

Can;t put it across in a forum post, but it's on TV more often than the news, well worth a look.

 

 

 

Stallone trying to play soccer in Escape To Victory is full of hilarious moments. Love that film.

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