Jump to content

Formula One - 2020


T Pot
 Share

Recommended Posts

Imola was one of the few that actually managed to get its changes properly done for 1995 - both Tamburello and Villeneuve were re profiled. They looked a bit like building sites, mind! Montreal used a tyre chicane to break up its once-fearsome back sweeping section leading to the chicane/wall of champions in 1995 before basically bulldozing it and turning it into a giant long straight for 1996.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, kiroquai said:

Ah - McLaren are linking up with Gulf so they took a car down to a Gulf filling station for the PR stuff :)

 

Where on earth does one go to buy Gulf fuel from? or is that an independant garage that's gone 'excellant PR opportunity if you cover up your shell logo's for half an hour!!!'

 

37 minutes ago, kiroquai said:

There's an excellent book by David Tremayne (for my money one of the finest motorsport authors/journos in the business) called Echoes of Imola and in the chapter that inevitably has to deal with the 72-hour nightmare in 1994, it struck me as very touching that a group of senior F1 journalists took time to purchase gifts for and comfort their annual bed-and-breakfast hosts near the circuit who were completely devastated by what had happened. General gist of it was that no circuit had deserved to have its reputation forever scarred like that, but of all the circuits on the calendar it was particularly sad that it happened to Imola.

 

That's my next read sorted, many thanks.

 

I never get why Tamburello wasn't sorted after Berger went off and nearly cooked himself only a handful of years before. I guess they'd want acres of run off to have such a corner these days, which at the time I seem to think wasn't an option.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Senna and Berger wandered down to Tamburello in 1990/1991 and took a look and realised that there was a big stream behind it, so figured they couldn't make the corner safer because the wall couldn't be moved. It only occurred to Berger years later that a tyre wall might have worked. I think gravel was off the cards due to the circuit's motorbike races.

 

Oh! Echoes of Imola is a really good read. Highly recommended, and should be able to pick it up pretty cheaply. Whilst looking for it, I can equally recommend Tremayne's 'Racers Apart' as another superb, affordable read :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Codemasters are going to be working overtime putting the new circuits into the 2021 game. My only worry is that apart from the Nurburgring the circuits are so narrow and F1 cars are so wide there's going to barely any overtaking behind Hamiton as he wins from pole. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, beenabadbunny said:

I'm clearly missing something with that forecourt photo. What's the story (and why is the car facing the wrong way?)

 

McLaren haven't announced Gulf sponsorship, that logo is new.  They just didn't hide the photo shoot very well.

 

16 hours ago, kiroquai said:

Yeah, the changes were a mixed bag in that they added two chicanes and took two away. .....

 

The final remaining Variente Bassa chicane was removed in 2008, so the cars now have a flat-out drag after the second Rivazza corner all the way down to the Tamburello Chicane.

 

Yeah, somehow Imola has 1 fewer net chicane than 1994.  Some designer is a genius.

 

16 hours ago, marsh said:

 

Where on earth does one go to buy Gulf fuel from? or is that an independant garage that's gone 'excellant PR opportunity if you cover up your shell logo's for half an hour!!!'

 

 

There are still actual UK Gulf stations. There's one near me.

 

image.png.84aa9260573c48a469b520ac1d7fc5b9.png

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 23/07/2020 at 23:00, Dudley said:

image.png.d5ba44da1d17599fde5b858a54f5ceaf.png

 

Well it's already blue and orange I guess...


Shame it’s not the old lighter blue...

 

17 hours ago, marsh said:

Where on earth does one go to buy Gulf fuel from? or is that an independant garage that's gone 'excellant PR opportunity if you cover up your shell logo's for half an hour!!!'

 

I thought that too, though it seems McLaren didn’t have to go too far since that one is in Aldershot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 05/07/2020 at 22:41, marsh said:

Dudley has nailed it imo.

 

Anyway, this should be far more interesting, I expect a Williams version in the future, though I sincerely hope it doesn't come to pass:

 

 

FB_IMG_1593985038608.jpg

 

Finished this just before returning to work last week. It's fair to say that losing Chapman was the begining of the end. Hiring Piquet was a collossal mistake, and the only person to do well out of that deal was Nelson, he trousered millions.

 

Another reason to dislike him just a little bit more....

 

It riases some interesting points that are valid today, Frank Williams would never let a driver command wages negotiations. You do wonder if by holding on to Russell, they are waiting for the right offer to be made?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, wev said:

Is Echoes of Imola only available in hardback?


I believe so, yes. It’s a smaller-sized hardback mind!

 

As for other book recommendations...

 

Chris Nixon’s trio of Rosemeyer, Mon Ami Mate and Racing the Silver Arrows are sublime. They are sadly very expensive, but superb pieces of work that really bring their historical subjects back to life like no other books I’ve read... apart from David Tremayne’s The Lost Generation. That deals with Tom Pryce, Roger Williamson and Tony Brise and is a touching, well-written tribute to three men who were all gone way before their time. I’d say that’s a mid-range book in terms of price. Maybe about £30.

 

if you’re really into the sport’s history and want to absorb yourself in seasons gone by, Mike Lang wrote four volumes of Grand Prix! (sometimes volumes 1 and 2 are bundled into the same book). These are superb race-by-race accounts of F1 seasons between 1950 and 1984. I believe he wanted to carry on but sadly it seems he became very ill before he could do so. Anyway, if you can get any of these books for under £20 (Volume 4 possibly a little less) then it’s money well-spent. They are excellent and much more than dry repetition of events; Lang really weaved each season’s story in superbly well. I’d argue these are my ‘go-to’ books to build any budding F1 book collection around. Some books that excellently dissect single seasons are Grand Prix Retro 1970/Grand Prix Retro 1980 by Mark Hughes and 1982 by the late and much-missed Christopher Hilton. These are all around £30 - £40.

 

A few biographies worth looking at are Gilles Villeneuve and James Hunt by Gerald Donaldson (both easily and cheaply available), the Didier Pironi book by David Sedgewick, Piers Courage by Adam Cooper (this offers a fascinating insight into early-era Frank Williams), Jim Clark by (that man again) David Tremayne which is pricy but an absolute masterpiece. One autobiography that is rather expensive but can appear cheaply on occasion on eBay is Peter Revson: Speed with Style. Revson penned this himself, but his ghost writer had to finish it for him as he unfortunately died shortly before it was completed. Oh, and (yet another) David Tremayne title in Jochen Rindt - Uncrowned King. I believe that this recently was re-released as a paperback at a decent price.

 

If you want a couple of period books written at interesting and tumultuous times in the sport’s history, go for The Chequered Flag by Douglas Rutherford and Chequered Year by Ted Simon. These were written in 1955 and 1970 respectively and offer a fascinating - if slightly of-the-period linguistically - look at two utterly chaotic and tragic seasons in motorsport. You can get both of these for about £20 if you are patient enough.
 

On the other hand, if you fancy a laugh or something that’ll make you feel mildly nauseous (and give you amazing Alan Partridge vibes) then go ahead and grab the Nigel Mansell book by James Allen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that amazing post!

I gave my dad Chris Nixon’s Rosemeyer a couple of years back, managed to get it for what I think was a very good price too.

 

Might set up some eBay watches, and get myself some, though I don’t read too often which I put down to me having no visual memory (eg can’t picture anything so fiction is a bit lost on me) but non-fiction is of course another story!


Also just remembered I have a Jim Clark book sitting unread somewhere, I’ll have to look it out and give it a read.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Freeman said:

 I don’t read too often which I put down to me having no visual memory (eg can’t picture anything so fiction is a bit lost on me) but non-fiction is of course another story!

 

 

 

Genuine question - does that affect you when you're learning a race circuit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 25/07/2020 at 09:22, Dudley said:

 

There are still actual UK Gulf stations. There's one near me.

 

image.png.84aa9260573c48a469b520ac1d7fc5b9.png

 

 

Drove past this for the first time in months today.

 

It's now a Harvest Energy.

 

So er... as you were.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, beenabadbunny said:

 

Genuine question - does that affect you when you're learning a race circuit?


Properly, but it’s hard to say as I don’t know any other way.

I remember things by fact / logic, so things like a tyre mark or darker grass or the start of a kerb for breaking points work perfectly for me. I think the repetitive nature of circuits helps a lot!

 

The biggest problem I have at 37 is that my memory is no where near as good as it was even 10 years ago, which I think is down to me having to rely on memory much more than most.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel dirty just sharing this because I'm so convinced this can't be true, at least not fully. So apparently Lewis Hamilton shared some anti-vax bill gates conspiracy video on Instagram. I'm struggling to believe this is fully true. I suspect he's been the victim of something. I've not seen the video and I'm only going on what is being said on the Autosport forum. I very much doubt this fully true. I mean, it can't be. He'd surely be dropped by Merc by the end of the end of the day if it was.

 

https://forums.autosport.com/topic/215601-lewis-hamilton-comes-out-as-anti-vaxxerconspiracy-theorist/

 

This guy makes a good point : https://forums.autosport.com/topic/215601-lewis-hamilton-comes-out-as-anti-vaxxerconspiracy-theorist/?p=9150169

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He has been bothering god for a while now no?

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/jul/04/lewis-hamilton-faith-perspective-f1

 

Quote

The 33-year-old has always been open about his Christian faith and believes it plays a major role in his life and his racing. At the Nurburgring in 2007 during qualifying, a wheel nut that had not been located correctly caused his tyre to blow under heavy loading into turn eight at 160mph and his car to spear nose-first into the barrier. It illustrated the danger he knows is a constant companion in F1.

“You don’t have time to pray,” he said of such incidents. “Anything can happen any day, but I feel God has his hand over me.” It is a belief strengthened by regular prayer and attendance at church. “I go with a couple of my close friends,” he said. “We meet, we go for breakfast and then we go to church together. We leave most often feeling enlightened and empowered, it’s like a re-centring.”

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In other news, I am still inching slowly towards writing that book I mentioned a while back. It’s a tricky proposition, mainly as the driver involved was dead by 1948. I do have a line of contact with a family member, mind - that would be invaluable help. I just want to make sure I feel I can do the subject properly. Mainly out of respect.

 

He’s had plenty written about him, but nothing much in English. It’s a story of a love affairs with team mates’ wives, drug addiction, seclusion and then a triumphant return tragically cut short. If he’d been born in any other era he’d have been a legend, but he sadly (and unfairly in some regards) will always sit in Tazio Nuvolari’s shadow.

 

But yes - I might be about to go on a hunt to uncover the enigmatic Achille Varzi :sherlock:

 

1C7C64B6-B6F6-4E09-A49E-62134C1335BD.png.b0ffdc426e9277625d0b7ae1a3deea11.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, kiroquai said:

In other news, I am still inching slowly towards writing that book I mentioned a while back. It’s a tricky proposition, mainly as the driver involved was dead by 1948. I do have a line of contact with a family member, mind - that would be invaluable help. I just want to make sure I feel I can do the subject properly. Mainly out of respect.

 

He’s had plenty written about him, but nothing much in English. It’s a story of a love affairs with team mates’ wives, drug addiction, seclusion and then a triumphant return tragically cut short. If he’d been born in any other era he’d have been a legend, but he sadly (and unfairly in some regards) will always sit in Tazio Nuvolari’s shadow.

 

But yes - I might be about to go on a hunt to uncover the enigmatic Achille Varzi :sherlock:

 

1C7C64B6-B6F6-4E09-A49E-62134C1335BD.png.b0ffdc426e9277625d0b7ae1a3deea11.png

 

If someone can write a two parter on the demise of lotus, well, where do I sign??

5 hours ago, fragglerock said:

 

Just a bit too Senna for me. We all remember big nose using the 'Ayrton believe's in god' line, and I'd hate to think that could happen again. Like I said, if it works for him then great. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.