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Ennio Morricone passes.


Pavey
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Sad news. I listen to Morricone's music an awful lot. It's fair to say that seeing The Good the Bad and The Ugly at the age of 10 or so had a formative effect on the direction of my musical tastes. For anyone who's not familiar with it, the recording of the concert he gave in Venice is fantastic.

 

 

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RIP

 

OG long version of Come Maddalena has the most perfectly restrained drumming, and Morricone himself later reworked it with a disco beat into a different but equally gorgeous track.

 

 

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Didn't he famously not write the music that was actually used in the Thing? I seem to remember Carpenter wrote his own, and only used little bits and pieces of the stuff Morricone did. Probably explains why it sounds so much like Carpenter's music.

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1 hour ago, David Kenny said:

Didn't he famously not write the music that was actually used in the Thing? I seem to remember Carpenter wrote his own, and only used little bits and pieces of the stuff Morricone did. Probably explains why it sounds so much like Carpenter's music.

 

I think he was trying to take the piss out of Carpenter but was such a talent his music is both a good mimic and excellent.

 

EDIT: Here's the story, apparently: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/the-thing-ennio-morricone-and-john-carpenters-thriller-soundtracks-get-special-rereleases-981073/

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1 hour ago, David Kenny said:

Didn't he famously not write the music that was actually used in the Thing? I seem to remember Carpenter wrote his own, and only used little bits and pieces of the stuff Morricone did. Probably explains why it sounds so much like Carpenter's music.

If I recall correctly, Morricone did most of it. Carpenter just instructed him to "use fewer notes". Carpenter himself wrote a lot of the shorter cues in-between. The main theme that sounds like classic Carpenter is actually written by Morricone.

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I consider myself deeply fortunate that I got to see him live in Budapest last year. Was an emotional wreck for the whole thing, then Cinema Paradiso was the encore and I completely fell apart.

 

Personal favourite of mine:

 

It just builds and builds, absolute blood stirrer.

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17 minutes ago, Cheyenne said:

I consider myself deeply fortunate that I got to see him live in Budapest last year. Was an emotional wreck for the whole thing, then Cinema Paradiso was the encore and I completely fell apart.

 

Personal favourite of mine:

 

It just builds and builds, absolute blood stirrer.

 

You lucky bugger!

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It was honestly a really refreshing selection of his work, sizable amount of his efforts with other Italian filmmakers outside of Leone and the Spaghetti Westerns. Opened with The Untouchables, got things like Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion, second half opened with L'Ultima Diligenza di Red Rock from Hateful Eight (think that film is crap but that track is stellar) as well as an obligatory rendition of The Ecstasy of Gold that sent literal chills through me. Only thing that let me down was no tracks from Once Upon a Time in America.

 

Also saw Joe Hisaishi last year as well. Good year for film concerts. :P

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There is a 2 minute or so track on a £3 cheapo ‘Western Spaghetti’ CD I bought when I was 17, which I think is my most listened to bit of music of my life (I’m 42 now and still go back to it often) - I don’t even know what film it’s from, having gone digital and disposed of the actual CD package around 15 years ago.

 

“A Gun for Ringo”. It’s just beautiful.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxUEipddLac

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On 06/07/2020 at 09:02, Mr Majestyk said:

I actually thought he'd died years ago. Love his work. And scored possibly my favourite scene in any film.

 

 

It’s so good I had to stop watching it.  
last saw this when I borrowed a projector from work and lobbed it up on a nice empty wall pre kids. Had some mates over - watched in awe. 
@Pavey make this the first film you watch in your home cinema will ya(I’ll bring the beers). 

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On 06/07/2020 at 09:02, Mr Majestyk said:

I actually thought he'd died years ago. Love his work. And scored possibly my favourite scene in any film.

 

 

I was just trying to imagine what the generation of filmgoers raised on MCU would think of that scene if it came out today. Imagine them sitting in though 8 minutes of music and close-ups of faces. Yet it's one of the greatest action scenes in cinema history in my opinion. 

 

Also made me wonder what a modern recreation would look like. No doubt today's hotshot leading man actors would love the camera just to be pointed at their faces for all that time but it would be all glowering and brooding. They (well Clint and Van Cleef) just look calm and collected but the scene conveys so much power because of their presence and of course the soundtrack. 

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My 7 year old daughter sat through the entirety of TGB&U with me last year, when train lines were shut by a typhoon and her school was closed. She watched the ending from behind the sofa. I talked about Ennio Morricone at dinner the other night, and when she asked who he was I told her he wrote the music from this movie - she remembered it vividly.

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