Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Whilst I saw a few people had commented that they own and are playing this game in the 'What Are You Playing?' thread, I noticed there wasn't a dedicated thread for this game; A Game of Thrones Card Game (Second Edition) [BGG Link]

 

I got into the game quite late, personally - mid 2019. I taught myself to play, and the wife - and we play together sometimes but I've never really found too many more people who are interested in playing it. So, hopefully I can find some fellow RLLMUK'ers to talk about it with here.

 

There's lots of resources online to help with the game, including agot.cards for news and podcasts, thronesdb.com for deckbuilding, and you can also play the game online at theironthrone.net - but of course, using the real physical card game is far more rewarding.

 

20190508_184609-2000x1125.thumb.jpg.feb2d33c808bdef4db401bddba9e5e0b.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The girlfriend and her neighbours are big into GOT since watching the TV Series.

 

We have been playing the GOT Skirmish RISK and it's been a blast!

 

I think this maybe right down our street, especially if we can play a faction each or something.

 

I'll give this a look and see if it could be our thing, is it easy for beginners would you say? 

  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I played Game of Thrones LCG 1.0 back when that was still running and I absolutely loved it. We had a decent group of people who played it and it only ended (after several years!) after our little meta became so refined that the game basically became a contest for who could deploy their power-combo first. I picked up 2.0 and actually liked it even more - the small changes to the rules improved the game hugely in my opinion (and put paid to the Lannisters drawing 5+ cards a turn, the fucks), but I never really had much of a group to play it with. I do have a complete playset though, which I'm happy about.

 

Most other LCGs have fallen by the wayside for me as they somehow expanded outside of my headspace. I absolutely loved Netrunner for the Core set and the first cycle or two - after that playing local became impossible as the game mutated far too fast and I couldn't dedicate the time to keeping up with it. The only competitive LCG I really place above AGoT was the Call of Cthulhu one which was really very special. I hope that one day they'll give it a bit of a reboot, but I'm not going to hold my breath over it.

 

Competitive LCGs die because of their weight. After a year, casual buy in becomes impossible if you want to compete with longer term players. The whole model needs a re-examination; the co-op ones seem to do much better because each cycle is so self contained.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Maybe this is a question that @Lying Cat can answer; but if anyone else can help - please chime in.

 

Winning the game; you need to get 15 or more power for your faction (incl. cards you control). And see that decks "must contain exactly 7 plot cards". What do you do when you have exhausted the 7 plot cards? Start again with those 7 plot cards? Grab some new plot cards? Or is the game over and whoever has the most power wins?

 

Right now, depending on how long the game has been going on for (and how tired the participants are), we have always mixed it up. Sometimes we picked out some random plots from the game box, sometimes we started over with the initial seven, and sometimes we called it a night and just let the person with the most power win.

 

I ask because some of the cards gain strength depending on how many plot cards are in the used pile. So, if you were to start over, what does that mean for that character's strength.

 

GT01_26.jpg

 

Also, some of the plot cards are a bit vague when it comes to which players the descriptions effect. For instance, the card Wildfire Assault reads that "Each player chooses up to 3 characters he or she controls. Kill each character not chosen (cannot be saved)." Now, I would personally say that "Each opposing player" would have to kill all but three. Only, when I played this on theironthrone.net then it wiped out my characters too. Which doesn't make sense to me. Why would I wipe out my own characters?

Whereas other cards mention you as the one receiving the action. You have to sacrifice a character - but in return you are getting the First Player token and a lot of gold.

 

GT08_47.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, scottcr said:

It's a great game - but I balied from it because LCGs are just money pits.  

 

Sure, but so are a lot of things that provide entertainment. To paraphrase a work colleague; "Look at it this way, if you get 3 hours of entertainment from it in a night, and play at least once a month. Over the years you'll own the game, you've spent your money better than, say, going to the cinema with those friends". 

 

I haven't really done the maths, but I guess it's correct of any game. You've just got the balance the money you are putting in with how often you play it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:

Maybe this is a question that @Lying Cat can answer; but if anyone else can help - please chime in.

 

Winning the game; you need to get 15 or more power for your faction (incl. cards you control). And see that decks "must contain exactly 7 plot cards". What do you do when you have exhausted the 7 plot cards? Start again with those 7 plot cards? Grab some new plot cards? Or is the game over and whoever has the most power wins?

 

 

Plot cards can exist in three different states: -

  1. In the plot deck
  2. Currently in use
  3. In the used plot pile

Once you've got 6 plots in the used plot pile, after you reveal your 7th and final plot, all the used plots are returned to your plot deck. The current plot is still in use and will go to the used plot pile at the end of the turn. On the 8th turn, you will then have your 7th plot in the used plot pile, and your 6 previous plots available to select.

 

58 minutes ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:

Right now, depending on how long the game has been going on for (and how tired the participants are), we have always mixed it up. Sometimes we picked out some random plots from the game box, sometimes we started over with the initial seven, and sometimes we called it a night and just let the person with the most power win.

 

No new plots enter play from the box!

 

58 minutes ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:

I ask because some of the cards gain strength depending on how many plot cards are in the used pile. So, if you were to start over, what does that mean for that character's strength.

 

On the 7th turn, as soon as your reveal your last plot, your used pile is returned to your normal plot pile, so any characters using traits dependent on the number of plots will reset to baseline as soon as the 7th plot is revealed.

 

58 minutes ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:

GT01_26.jpg

 

Also, some of the plot cards are a bit vague when it comes to which players the descriptions effect. For instance, the card Wildfire Assault reads that "Each player chooses up to 3 characters he or she controls. Kill each character not chosen (cannot be saved)." Now, I would personally say that "Each opposing player" would have to kill all but three. Only, when I played this on theironthrone.net then it wiped out my characters too. Which doesn't make sense to me. Why would I wipe out my own characters?
 

 

Yep. Unless a card specifies that it only affects opponents, then it always affects you as well. Wildfire is an indiscriminate attack, so it's a plot you want to time to use correctly. If you've got a board advantage in terms of the number of characters, this is definitely not a plot you'd want to use. It is however fantastic if your opponent has 6 characters, and you only have 3 because it will close the gap up.

 

Maintaining board advantage, or stopping your opponent from gaining one is a core element of AGOT. You don't want to kill your own characters, but hurting yourself a bit to hurt your opponent more is often something you DO want to do.

 

58 minutes ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:



Whereas other cards mention you as the one receiving the action. You have to sacrifice a character - but in return you are getting the First Player token and a lot of gold.

 

GT08_47.jpg

 

Yep. This is right. 7 Gold and 7 Initiative is a fantastic card, so the price is you have to kill a character. But if your deck is well built, you'll have some claimbait laying around to throw into the grinder.

 

edit - another thing to consider is that if you starting deployment consists only of locations, you can use this Plot first, have to sacrifice nothing and get the benefits too, so depending on what's going on it can be a brilliant kickstart card for your game. Especially if one of the locations get get down first is an econ location.

 

---

 

So as an example, here's a particularly brutal card: -

 

GT12_80.jpg.fd11a7958d26ede2179620d9d862945e.jpg

 

So this one just wipes the entire board (but character can be saved).

 

It's also important to note that some plot cards have "When Revealed" on them. This means that they these effects must be resolved first in the order of the player winning initiatives choosing. So it's possible for the winning player to force a player to use their plot to put another character into play and then Valar, killing the new guy.

 

After that, you do the rest of the plots which aren't When Reveal, again in the order of the player winning initiative's choosing.

 

edit - if at any point you want to jump on the online game, @BlackHoodedCrow, I would be more than happy to talk you through game strategy from my perspective and the like? Just let me know if you want to, and we can sort it out!

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lying Cat said:

No new plots enter play from the box!

 

What can I say?! I'm a rebel.

 

1 hour ago, Lying Cat said:

So any characters using traits dependent on the number of plots will reset to baseline as soon as the 7th plot is revealed.

 

Mamma mia!

giphy.gif

 

1 hour ago, Lying Cat said:

edit - if at any point you want to jump on the online game, @BlackHoodedCrow, I would be more than happy to talk you through game strategy from my perspective and the like? Just let me know if you want to, and we can sort it out!

 

Awesome! Thank you for your tips and advice! I really want to get some of my friends into it and play the physical game some more. I spend too much time staring at the screen. However, I might take you up on your offer one day! I need to learn how to play properly so I can teach others too.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BlackHoodedCrow said:

 

Sure, but so are a lot of things that provide entertainment. To paraphrase a work colleague; "Look at it this way, if you get 3 hours of entertainment from it in a night, and play at least once a month. Over the years you'll own the game, you've spent your money better than, say, going to the cinema with those friends". 

 

I haven't really done the maths, but I guess it's correct of any game. You've just got the balance the money you are putting in with how often you play it.

 

Oh if I played it enough I'd have stuck with it - I just didn't and couldn't keep up.  Too many games and other things pulling on my time :(  I got rid of my Arkham Horror LCG collection for the same reason.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/08/2020 at 17:46, BlackHoodedCrow said:

Awesome! Thank you for your tips and advice!

 

If you're sick of staring at screens, and don't want to get locked into an online game with some random guy online unless you absolutely have to (understandable), I thought I'd scribble out some of the stuff that's occurred to me over the years when I've been playing the game across two different editions of the game. It's important to remember that I am principally a Greyjoy player, and they've got quite a specific style of play.

 

The Golden Rule: Game of Thrones is a complicated game with a hell of a lot to think about. You can lose a lot of games getting lost in trying to be clever, so the most important thing to do at the start of every turn is to look at the board and ask yourself "can I win this turn?" 

 

Deck Building - Game of Thrones has it's roots in the Magic: the Gathering school of needing to get some resource cards out to pay for stuff. It's less necessary as you have your plot deck to provide basic income, but you definitely want to be including more stuff, especially as the upper level characters are pretty expensive. Generally you want this sort of ratio for your deck: -

  • 25% Economy Cards - this includes cards that you destroy to reduce the costs of these things. Stuff like Sea Tower is great, especially early on as it provides cost reductions for a deployment cost of zero. Generally I rate cost-reducers above +Gold cards because gold can be stolen, Cost-Reducers can't really be used by your opponent.
  • 25% Low Cost Characters - I think for Second Edition, a "cheap" character is going to be between 1-3 Gold to play out. You never want to be without cheap characters to soak up military claim, and it's absolutely legitimate to include characters in your deck just to have them die in the place of the characters you want to keep. While there's nothing in 2.0 as crazy at this 1.0 Theon, it's fine for people to die. Generally I don't include multiple copies of my cheap uniques for this reason.
  • 25% Higher Cost Characters - So this is the 4+ cost guys. These are the cards that you'll generally hinge your strategy on, and they need to be protected by your cheap dudes. Before you include multiple copies of these guys, consider whether you really need that many copies. Once they die, all duplicates in your hand become dead cards. It's best to include multiple copies of cards that you really need to draw.
  • 25% Everything Else - This is quite a tight category for Attachments/Events/Locations, but having a flood of these things is a total nightmare.

... From this point, you just refine the deck through the usual process. Finding you're ending up with too much money with nothing to spend it on, take out some economy cards, etc. This is a large chunk of the fun of the game for me.

 

In terms of your Plot deck, there are a couple of things I always like to include: -

  • A card with some cash! Pentoshi is a great example of this. It helps your opponents, but if they're likely to be getting a smaller advantage than you! If you combine this with an Agenda like Red Door, it really helps you get your start customised to begin with. If you can get a couple of econ locations out as part of Setup, you can really come out of the gates fast by playing Pentoshi and buying a whole bunch of characters. Obviously, if you don't have any money, don't use Pentoshi!
  • A Reset - Valar or Wildfire Assault are excellent. If your opponent is pulling ahead of you, kill everyone. If you notice that your opponent has got a bunch of his super important characters out, then Valar. Kill them. Once they're in the dead pile, they're out of the game. Then you can start to come back.
  • Tutors - If your deck really hinges on some specific dudes or locations, tutors can really help with getting them out.
  • Consider a Stall - Calm over Westeros is a great first turn card if you want to build board position. Name Military as the conflict type and it means that your opponent will be reduced to claim zero and unable to kill your dudes. If the deploy a Claim 2+ card on the first turn, they're likely giving up a lot to do it, and you'll blunt it anyway.
  • A high initiative card - sometimes you really need to be able to go first.

Challenges Phase - This is of course where you're going to kick one anothers teeth out, so to speak. You'll generally want to approach this differently whether you're playing Melee or Joust. If you're playing a lot of Melee, please remember the golden Melee rule: Don't take the lead until you're ready to win on your turn. Melee games can rapidly turn into a "kick the leader" games - so just make sure you're doing that well.

 

Also for Melee, forget about honour. If you can win on your turn by absolutely savaging the player who's least able to protect themselves then do that. There's absolutely no reason to stand up to the big guys unless they're going to win if you don't. I've won a lot of games, and a few (local) melee tournaments by maintaining a slightly distant second place, wait for the winner to be kicked in, dropping my high initiative card the next turn and then wrecking him enough to scramble up over the Power threshold before he has had time to recover. If you're playing Melee with friends, it can be hard to do this, especially if somebody is having a bad game and they're not having fun...

 

... but it's Game of Thrones. At least you're bringing the game to a close, and they'll probably be doing it to you next game.

 

In terms of the actual challenges, you really need to think about the order you want to do them in. Military can make it harder for them to defend more challenges, Social can strip cards out of their hand they might try and ambush you with - generally I always do Power challenges last because they don't actually help the board state. If they've got a front line of big tough guys, then absolutely do not be afraid to poke at their front line with your Strength 1 starving peasant. You'll force them into a tough position where they either need to Kneel their Strength 5 powerhouse to block you (meaning they can't use it to hit you back), or you get an uncontested strike.

 

On the other hand, don't always feel like you need to defend yourself. The point is to win, not keep your guys safe. And so what if that Strength 1 Starving Peasant has to die to satisfy their claim? Let them walk through, and take it unchallenged. That's just more Power for your turn. Generally, I'm always happy to take loses as long as I know that when it comes back around I'm going to be hitting back harder. It's fine to let your opponent exhaust their top guys charging you unguarded lines. If they kneel enough you might just get three unopposed attacks back the other way on your turn.

 

This is why you need to have Claimbait chumps on the board at all times - to eat up this and leave your big guys to tear them apart on the return. The only thing to really remember is that lots of event cards activate if your opponent wins by 5 or more. So it can often be worthwhile trying to keep their victory to 4. But always remember, all that matters for the most part is that you got punched. How hard you got punched is irrelevant.

 

---

 

I've probably written more than you care to read already, so I'll shut up now, but if you've got any questions, please do come back to me on it! I'm really enjoying talking about this game because I love it so much. Just make sure you keep your eyes on that 15 Power victory condition. Everything else is just a resource to get you over the line - getting protective over your board state because you like the character rather than because they're helping you win is sometimes a mindset challenging to get past - Game of Thrones as a lot of great characters, and people include their favourites.

 

One of the people I used to play with always included John Snow as a triplicate because she loved the character so much and would always try and turn him into Voltron - I always did my best to kill him, because whenever I did she immediately went on Tilt and generally lost games because of it.

 

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.