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Xbox Series X | S


djbhammer
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1 hour ago, Plissken said:

Ars mentioned that there is a mesh in there somewhere.

 

I do hope you are right, I did scan their article but couldn't see it mentioned and have a look at this... 

 

image.png.e2600d515f4d1512b75fe737772fcca1.png

 

You can see some of the fan blades clearly but I still could be wrong.

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39 minutes ago, JPL said:

I’m pretty confident they’re telling the truth about its capabilities. Imagine the backlash if they were lying!

 

It’ll still be good to see it next to the X though.

Oh yeah, totally. I'm not suggesting they are lying about it at all, more that there may be a bit of 'glossing over' some details at this stage if they are less positive. 

 

e.g. will a target frame rate be solid on both but just at different resolutions, or could we end up seeing stuff like 60@4K on an X and 40@1440 on an S, or what does a BC game look/run like using the 'One S' BC mode upscaled on the S verses the full 4K native BC mode on the Series X. We've had some info but nothing has really been put to the test to see what that actually means.

 

If it genuinely runs a Series X game exactly the same as a Series X but just at 1440p upscaled then happy days! I'm just keen to know before the money leaves my account and I'm locked in :) 

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55 minutes ago, BarryL85 said:

 

I do hope you are right, I did scan their article but couldn't see it mentioned and have a look at this... 

 

image.png.e2600d515f4d1512b75fe737772fcca1.png

 

You can see some of the fan blades clearly but I still could be wrong.

 

There deffo is - I remember reading it - might have been from DF - I'll see if I can find it again...

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On the hard drive video - thanks for posting that, it was quite interesting to know as I do think that 1TB internal is going to fill up quickly.

He's testing an SSD SATA drive, attached with a SATA -> USB adapter.

There's basically no difference with this and an external, USB3.1 SSD drive, right?

I have a Samsung T5 1TB SSD drive that is empty and currently I'm not using, so it's pleasing to know that I can stick all my Xbox One and earlier games on that without much difference and not use up space that is more valuable for XSX games. 

I'm just curious why he seemed to talk about SATA adapters like there wasn't another option there. I guess that he's talking about the cost benefit, and maybe this is cheaper than a USB SSD drive.

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Just now, Wahwah* said:

 

On second look, you might be right, it's more longboat than pirate ship, whoops! 

 

But still, just two games?

 

I wonder if all of Microsoft's marketing was to be Halo and AC?

 

There was the big space face eating the planet and those weird buildings as well, which I presume are from a couple of new games. No idea what they are though!

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10 minutes ago, cowfields said:

On the hard drive video - thanks for posting that, it was quite interesting to know as I do think that 1TB internal is going to fill up quickly.

He's testing an SSD SATA drive, attached with a SATA -> USB adapter.

There's basically no difference with this and an external, USB3.1 SSD drive, right?

I have a Samsung T5 1TB SSD drive that is empty and currently I'm not using, so it's pleasing to know that I can stick all my Xbox One and earlier games on that without much difference and not use up space that is more valuable for XSX games. 

I'm just curious why he seemed to talk about SATA adapters like there wasn't another option there. I guess that he's talking about the cost benefit, and maybe this is cheaper than a USB SSD drive.

It's a good video. I looked up that Samsung drive and it's still over £100 for 1TB:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-Internal-Solid-State-MZ-77Q4T0/dp/B089QXQ1TV?th=1

 

Definitely worth considering for the next year or two, while we're still playing XB1 games and waiting for the official expansion drive to come down in price!

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25 minutes ago, Pob said:

It's a good video. I looked up that Samsung drive and it's still over £100 for 1TB:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-Internal-Solid-State-MZ-77Q4T0/dp/B089QXQ1TV?th=1

 

Definitely worth considering for the next year or two, while we're still playing XB1 games and waiting for the official expansion drive to come down in price!

 

I swear I didn't pay that much for it! Maybe I did...I bought it to use with a Macbook pro as I thought I'd be moving a lot of data but, I just didn't end up using it, so it's sat around doing nothing. It's really nice and compact though, so I'm happy I've got it for this launch! 

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I picked up this no-name TCSUNBOW 2TB SSD, which routinely drops below £130, and have no complaints after putting it in a USB 3.1 enclosure.

 

Granted I'd be more hesitant about going with a less established brand if I was installing the drive in a server or storing important data, but the worst case scenario when using it with a console is that the drive fails and I have a bunch of downloading to do.

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Anyone know if Elite is getting the XSX treatment? I backed the kickstarter but my PC was too crap to run it, and then honestly found the base Xbox version to be clunky, too. But figure it'll be glorious, given the 4k treatment. 

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2 hours ago, BarryL85 said:

 

I do hope you are right, I did scan their article but couldn't see it mentioned and have a look at this... 

 

image.png.e2600d515f4d1512b75fe737772fcca1.png

 

You can see some of the fan blades clearly but I still could be wrong.

 

Quote

Oh, right, the holes. I'll conclude this Xbox Series X preview by talking about the console's venting array.

 

I've never seen a console expose its essential venting apparatus as much as Xbox Series X, and with such a large surface, at that. Pretty much any other console I can think of has been careful about which sides include openings for venting, or ensuring that the likely "top" surface is, to put it bluntly, kid-proof. The dot-lined sides of Microsoft's previous console, Xbox One X, were the thin ones, and if you put the console in vertical orientation, you couldn't easily balance a soda on top of it.

 

When I first previewed Series X last week, I included a photo of me placing a soda can on top, in order to demonstrate how flippin' easily you can do so. The symmetry of this venting divot is perfect for holding standard cans, soup cans, or thinner cans, in such a way that they don't tip over. Yet the funky angle of it is perfect for accidentally tipping them, should you not get a good handle as you grab hold.

 

There's really no other way around it: you can absolutely get liquid and crumbs directly into your Series X's innards by spilling them down there. The larger, pencil-sized dots are interrupted by a rubber venting fan. Beneath that are many smaller dots, and beneath those are shielded motherboard elements. You probably won't get water directly onto crucial motherboard elements with a small spill, but if it was a good idea to spill solids and liquids onto a shielded motherboard, Microsoft would've filled the console with water already. (Or, for gamer cred, with Doritos and Mountain Dew.)

 

I'm confident that didn't block the console from dissipating heat as needed, but I point it out as a reminder. The console's handsome vertical orientation is tempting to leave stuff on top of, but this is generally a bad idea. Worse, this orientation is a tougher sell if you've got kids in your home—who, at the very least, are going to put stuff on top of this venting array, if not do worse. I'd suggest parents immediately turn an Xbox Series X to horizontal orientation and hide it in a cabinet. That's not out of fear for your kids' fingers, by the way; the holes are all 10mm in diameter, smaller than the "baby" sized ring-diameter rating of 12.9mm. But you can absolutely get a pencil in there (perhaps not a thicker crayon), at which point it will collide with the console's quickly spinning fan to make a loud, rubber-flapping sound.

 

I didn't experiment any further than getting a pencil to make significant contact with the system's fans for about half a second, or inserting a plastic straw for roughly 10 seconds of fan contact. I wasn't trying to break the thing, since I still have at least one more article about this hardware in the works. But I was surprised that neither test wasn't recognized by the hardware and met with an automatic shutdown, perhaps with an on-screen notice upon reboot like, "Out of an abundance of caution, we noticed a hardware irregularity and powered down; please don't do that again."

 

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33 minutes ago, TehStu said:

Anyone know if Elite is getting the XSX treatment? I backed the kickstarter but my PC was too crap to run it, and then honestly found the base Xbox version to be clunky, too. But figure it'll be glorious, given the 4k treatment. 


It’s got 4K assets already. 

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48 minutes ago, deerokus said:

I suppose 'can you balance a can of irn bru on it' is a sensible test to... someone. 

I mean at some point, you just have to accept that you can't let kids pour liquid on 500 dollar electronics. And I know that's flippant, but you can break anything with a drink, so. 

 

On the heat thing, I've had to tell the kids not to leave the pads on the XB1, they leave them right in the big fan outlet. I think having this thing behind the TV will help considerably. 

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