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My brother in law had commodores as a kid, first a 64 then the Amiga. 
 

I was telling him that I’ve recently picked up an Amiga along with a few games I knew he had as growing up.  When I asked if he wanted to hook it up and play was a bit hesitant saying that he didn’t know if he wants to ruin his memories of playing those games 30 years ago. 
 

Initially incredulous, I’ve started to think that, God, he might be right. There’s plenty of games I have amazing memories of that are either impossible to play now or Have aged terribly. 
 

Do you play games you loved in the past a lot, or use the gear now to play games you may have wanted in years gone by?  Do you think it’s maybe a bit ruinous?

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Well this is essentially the entire point of Yesterzine and in some cases you're right.

 

Also though there are times where you play something that either wasn't well regarded or you bounced off at the time and get it.

 

It can ruin games though, at the risk of spoiling an episode I recently replayed Top Gear 2 and Lamborghini American Challenge on the SNES, which are effectively Lotus 1.5 and Crazy Cars 3 for Amiga owners.

 

One is probably better than I remember it, one has really aged poorly.

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There are very few games I go back to now that I am disappointed with. Those I enjoyed as a kid I still love now - Run Baby Run and Mega-lo-Mania still get played frequently.

 

In fact, I’ve often found the reverse to be true! I played Ristar last year and enjoyed it despite hating it in the 90s, for example. I’ve also been able to play some old adventure games and SRPGs now which I didn’t get the references, rules or puzzles in at the time.

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I haven't found this to be the case, yet. I have a much better understanding of what my tastes are than when I was 8, obviously, and have pruned my collection according to them, but even if I go back to a bit of a stinker, I'm usually already fully aware of what I'm getting into. I might have fond memories of playing Bart Vs. The Space Mutants, but definitely no rose-tinted specs. :P

 

Finally playing games I couldn't at the time has been a pretty consistently incredible experience, too - e.g. over the last few years I've devoured most of the Shin Megami Tensei games (starting with the earlier, rougher ones) and have fallen in love with most of them, and the recent Mega Drive release of Mad Stalker hasn't revealed a dodgy prototype better left in 1994 but one of the best games I've played this year. I guess it helps if you don't see everything in terms of linear "progress" towards objectively better things, or in terms of "quality-of-life" improvements over time, etc - I'm just as happy playing R-Type as I am playing R-Type Delta, and just as happy playing an old Sir-Tech Wizardry game as I am playing Etrian Odyssey V...

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Recently I remembered a game on the Amiga...I recall the graphics being amazing. Like next level sort of amazing..beautiful, really detailed like something from the future. I looked it up...

 

 

but sometimes things are as fun as you remember..

 

 

 

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For me  I think I remember most games as they were and revisiting them doesn't spoil memories. I can't think of a game I replayed expecting to still love it, the games usually are as I remember them being.  However I have become aware that when I had a Spectrum as a kid I never progressed at many games and kind of missed the point of lots of them, playing them for hours and never actually working through the missions.  Examples like Amaurote, Feud, Glider Rider, Starquake, Head Over Heels, all great games which, when revisiting them on emulation makes the realise I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing. Glider Rider on the 128K especially, I'd drive the bike to a ramp, take off as a glider and listen to the music change, land again and listen to more music.  Never had a clue what I was supposed to be doing to progress.

 

But I do have the feeling you mentioned about specific hardware formats.  The Playstation One was a fab console in the day  and when revisiting it's hard to ignore the dreadful 3D warping and jumping.  On revisiting Tomb Raider on PS1 the cliffs are so blocky, warped and jagged that it seems impossible to see where you're  supposed to go.  There's a few games on PS1 that have the most awful 3D issues  but we never knew until later generations fixed the issues and suddenly you can see them clearly on the previous gen.

 

Likewise the original Gameboy Advance - how did we not realise that it was virtually impossble to see the screen?  I mean  surely that should be a given.  Playing a GBA today is an extraordinary challenge, it can look like it's not switched on!

 

But the confusing one for me is the 3DO, I was a big fan of that but if you go back to play it today you realise that almost every game on it is complete shit. I'm not sure whether that translates as a problem with the games or the system itself but stuff like 7th Guest  , Twisted Game Show , Poed, The Horde , all seemed great at the time but they're truly awful.  Even Demolition Man with the special scenes made just for the game is very poor. 3DO had some belters (Need for Speed, Road Rash) but they all came out on better hardware and in hindsight I can't think of a single 3DO game worth playing. And much as I love Night Trap, it's amazing how truly unplayable the Digital Pictures FMV stuff (Supreme Warrior for example) , or the Mortal Kombat rip off they did (Katsumi Ninja?), I mean you just play them today and they are all really really terrible.  

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14 hours ago, dumpster said:

For me  I think I remember most games as they were and revisiting them doesn't spoil memories. I can't think of a game I replayed expecting to still love it, the games usually are as I remember them being.  However I have become aware that when I had a Spectrum as a kid I never progressed at many games and kind of missed the point of lots of them, playing them for hours and never actually working through the missions.  Examples like Amaurote, Feud, Glider Rider, Starquake, Head Over Heels, all great games which, when revisiting them on emulation makes the realise I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing. Glider Rider on the 128K especially, I'd drive the bike to a ramp, take off as a glider and listen to the music change, land again and listen to more music.  Never had a clue what I was supposed to be doing to progress.

 

But I do have the feeling you mentioned about specific hardware formats.  The Playstation One was a fab console in the day  and when revisiting it's hard to ignore the dreadful 3D warping and jumping.  On revisiting Tomb Raider on PS1 the cliffs are so blocky, warped and jagged that it seems impossible to see where you're  supposed to go.  There's a few games on PS1 that have the most awful 3D issues  but we never knew until later generations fixed the issues and suddenly you can see them clearly on the previous gen.

 

Likewise the original Gameboy Advance - how did we not realise that it was virtually impossble to see the screen?  I mean  surely that should be a given.  Playing a GBA today is an extraordinary challenge, it can look like it's not switched on!

 

But the confusing one for me is the 3DO, I was a big fan of that but if you go back to play it today you realise that almost every game on it is complete shit. I'm not sure whether that translates as a problem with the games or the system itself but stuff like 7th Guest  , Twisted Game Show , Poed, The Horde , all seemed great at the time but they're truly awful.  Even Demolition Man with the special scenes made just for the game is very poor. 3DO had some belters (Need for Speed, Road Rash) but they all came out on better hardware and in hindsight I can't think of a single 3DO game worth playing. And much as I love Night Trap, it's amazing how truly unplayable the Digital Pictures FMV stuff (Supreme Warrior for example) , or the Mortal Kombat rip off they did (Katsumi Ninja?), I mean you just play them today and they are all really really terrible.  

On the GBA, I noticed right away the screen was completely useless. More annoyed that no magazines at the time pointed this out. Sold mine soon after buying and bought the clam shell one when that finally came out.

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I never owned a GBA at the time but did borrow one briefly in 2002 ish to play Castlevania: Circle of the Moon and really struggled to get the lighting just right in order to see. The GBA : SP was the solution albeit not quite as ergonomic but had a proper back light. I think I remember also coming across an attachment to put handles on the SP and thinking that would solve the handling problem and be the way forward. In the end I never got one until my GBA micro about 7 years ago or so. That’s an ergonomic nightmare but has the best screen. I’ve hardly used it at all. 

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The way I think about it is that even if I replay a game I loved as a kid and find that it’s absolutely shite, I still have the memories of enjoying it. If I play Supercars 2 now and discover that it’s a nightmare of continually being blown up and respawning rather than the perfectly balanced action driving classic I remember it as, then that doesn’t invalidate all my memories of laughing so hard during multiplayer games that I could barely see the screen.

 

I mean, it seems obvious, but I’m a different person now to the me who played all those Xbox 360 games, let along the me who played Amiga and BBC Micro games. I could never enjoy them in the same way that I enjoyed them back in the day, even if they were still good. But it’s still interesting to replay old games like Turrican through the lens of thirty years of good game design, and work out why I enjoyed it then but not now. 

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It is subjective, sorry for stating the obvious.

I replayed the original medievil for the first time in years and I was really like wow,

This game is still as good as anything ever, after I finished it again, I checked out some videos and one guy said that he really wish he'd left it in the past. I really couldn't of disagreed more with what he said.

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This doesn’t happen often to me, but the most stark reminder that some games age better than others was when I bought the arcade boards of Double Dragon and Double Dragon II. I’d played the first one on friends computers way back when, and had experienced both briefly in arcades (they were end of shelf life before I ever played an arcade game, but places like caravan sites sometimes had older games). I remember being blown away with the way there were so many enemies and how new and exciting this genre was to me. I don’t think I ever played them after I was about 8 (so early 90’s). When I got the arcade games in around 2013 I tried both and realised how shit both games are. They paved the way for the genre, but in doing so were quickly superseded over and over.

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It also works the other way round.

Arcade conversions on 8 bit hardware, turtles (famicom) for example...I get more out of that now....bitd would of been my young mind saying , inferior, and in some cases, they really aren't.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Soulstar said:

I never owned a GBA at the time but did borrow one briefly in 2002 ish to play Castlevania: Circle of the Moon and really struggled to get the lighting just right in order to see. The GBA : SP was the solution albeit not quite as ergonomic but had a proper back light. I think I remember also coming across an attachment to put handles on the SP and thinking that would solve the handling problem and be the way forward. In the end I never got one until my GBA micro about 7 years ago or so. That’s an ergonomic nightmare but has the best screen. I’ve hardly used it at all. 

 

Front lit unless you were lucky enough to get an AGS-101.

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I try and pretend that revisiting old games is no different to revisiting old books, films, or music - they should still be the same as they were, right? However, the games may stay the same but we change - we don't have the free time or patience we used to, etc - and the games I used to see as fun may be a bit rough when looked at objectively today. On the other hand, a lot of things hold up really well, so I think it's worth rolling the dice. :) 

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3 hours ago, Qazimod said:

I try and pretend that revisiting old games is no different to revisiting old books, films, or music

 

Interesting that you should say that, given I've found revisiting books, film and music to have the same potential for reappraisal as games do for me; going back and discovering media of my youth isn't quite as rich or witty as I recall, or alternatively revealing qualities and depths I'd missed on first encounter, is something I've found across all media.

 

The main difference is that going back 30 years or more with video games often reveals interfaces that are a pain to work with, design concepts that have long been put to rest (for good or ill), graphics or performance issues that render them harder to enjoy with a modern eye. For other media you have to go back a lot further to find similar issues, as their formative years are long passed - for me the silent era of film, the florid 19th century novel are the closest equivalents: hard to go back to outside of certain exceptional titles.

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16 hours ago, K said:

If I play Supercars 2 now and discover that it’s a nightmare of continually being blown up and respawning rather than the perfectly balanced action driving classic I remember it as

 

I used to play this round at a mates on his A600. Haven't played it since. I also remembered it as a stone cold classic. I'd obviously supressed the blowing up memory until you just wrote the above. Now it's all come flooding back!

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7 hours ago, Benny said:

Head over Heels has actually improved with age. It was a lot better than the Ultimate isometric games that inspired the form.

Agree.

 

Main criticism I have of Head Over Heels now is that playing on a emulator with quicksaves, it’s much smaller game than it seemed to me long ago, but that’s part of the territory when replaying 8-bit classics.

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17 minutes ago, MK-1601 said:

I dug out and powered up my GBA:SP recently and I'll just say that those in the thread remembering it as solving the issues with the original GBA screen are in for a shock.

 

It definitely solved the issue of having a screen you couldn't see unless you had perfect lighting.

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The GBA SP(I think) suffers from degradation over time like the original Gameboy did.  That is to say, if you play an original Gameboy today you remember the the trails and faded screen, but that 30 year old console is much more blurry and faded than it was 30 years ago.  

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15 hours ago, MK-1601 said:

I dug out and powered up my GBA:SP recently and I'll just say that those in the thread remembering it as solving the issues with the original GBA screen are in for a shock.

I was playing mine last night, not a 101 but still good enough, I think

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7 hours ago, dumpster said:

The GBA SP(I think) suffers from degradation over time like the original Gameboy did.  That is to say, if you play an original Gameboy today you remember the the trails and faded screen, but that 30 year old console is much more blurry and faded than it was 30 years ago.  

Do they actually degrade!?! Shit. Didn't know that.

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3 hours ago, bplus said:

Do they actually degrade!?! Shit. Didn't know that.

Thinking about it I might be completely wrong.  Was it the screen that fades, or the light in front of it? Or am I misremembering this entirely? 

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3 hours ago, dumpster said:

Thinking about it I might be completely wrong.  Was it the screen that fades, or the light in front of it? Or am I misremembering this entirely? 

To be fair my GBA screen doesn't look amazing. Especially compared to emulator videos of Gameboy color on YouTube (good way to play Gameboy color games with a back light the GBA)

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I do wonder to what degree early LED/LCD etc. screens degrade over time. I dug out an old monitor (circa 2004-5?) to use as an extra screen recently, I couldn't believe how terrible the colours (particularly white balance) were. Did I really play through Half-Life 2 in smeary nicotine-o-vision?

 

(I suspect it's more likely that the lamp had crapped out)

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