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Biggest incremental jump between console generations?


Droo
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An issue of perspective, I guess. In football games your view is pretty much that of a spectator at home, while your god-given ability to control each player means you don't feel like you're a inhabiting a specific role, so commentary doesn't feel out of place.

 

Racing games, on the other hand, you are very specifically the driver, viewed from a first- or second-person camera; you don't feel like a viewer in the same way, so commentary doesn't feel quite as appropriate.*

 

(biggest console jump for me was 32-bit to Dreamcast, thanks to finally achieving truly arcade-perfect performance - and due to having been a home computer gamer all my life, so the 'shift to 3D' of the previous gen having felt a bit less of significant than it might otherwise have done; too many 3D flight sims, fps's and adventure games had already left me used to that sort of tech, so it wasn't until the DC's clarity of visuals that I was really blown away)

 

*unlike, say, co-driver chatter in rally games

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That's true. I'd also say the commentary in F1 wasn't so much about the commentary itself, it was the fact that it was Murray Walker doing it. His voice was such an iconic part of watching motorsport that it added a phenomenal amount of enjoyment to the game - I'm no expert, but I feel like no-one else has achieved the same status since. I don't think you'd get the same thrill from Ben Edwards and David Coulthard.

 

I enjoyed Chris Harris' voiceover in the Top Gear bits in Forza Horizon 4 in the same way. It's about recreating the atmosphere of a particular aspect of watching televised car racing, not that commentary actually adds some inherent value to a game.

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On 16/12/2020 at 09:19, mikejenkins said:

To me, 8 to 16 bit generation jump was big, then two more big jumps to PS1/N64 gen for usable real-time 3D and PS2/DC/Xbox which made 3D less ugly. Everything since seems to have been incremental.

Agree in terms of pure visuals. Don't think games have evolved that much since the PS3/360 in terms of concepts and ideas.

 

 For me the biggest jumps recently have been in experiences has been how we can engage with gaming environments so the release of VR into mainstream price brackets has been great.

 

 

 

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To throw a curveball at this one, the Series X is hands down the biggest improvement on quality of life I’ve ever seen. It’s slowly been getting worse as consoles have more and more stuff on their home screens, and it’s all got rather bloated and sluggish, but this generation everything is so much faster than my PS4, I must have put thousands of hours into retro consoles over the past 7 years because I couldn’t be arsed turning on the PS4 only for it to need to update whichever friggin game I wanted to play then the PS4 needed an update, then it’d take 10 minutes from the updates to actually having booted into the game and loaded where I was up to.

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14 minutes ago, phillv85 said:

To throw a curveball at this one, the Series X is hands down the biggest improvement on quality of life I’ve ever seen. It’s slowly been getting worse as consoles have more and more stuff on their home screens, and it’s all got rather bloated and sluggish, but this generation everything is so much faster than my PS4, I must have put thousands of hours into retro consoles over the past 7 years because I couldn’t be arsed turning on the PS4 only for it to need to update whichever friggin game I wanted to play then the PS4 needed an update, then it’d take 10 minutes from the updates to actually having booted into the game and loaded where I was up to.

 

wow... and how does it compare to the original xbox one? :coffee:

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I'm late to the thread but I've always thought of it like this

 

PS1/N64 = WOW POLYS!

PS2 era = WOW NORMAL MAPS!

PS3 era = WOW DYNAMIC LIGHTING!

PS4 era = WOW PBR!

PS5 era = WOW RAYTRACING AND VIRTUALIZED GEOMETRY! (Too early to tell but this seems to be the way it's going)

 

I don't know if there will ever be a bigger shakeup than that PS1 era, it really changed the dev landscape. 

 

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I’ve thought about this and I really can’t think of a bigger jump than 16bit to 32bit. Especially if we can cherry pick titles from along the console lifespan.
 

When I think of the best racing game on the SNES, and put it up against Ridge Racer 4 or Sega Rally, it’s just such an incredible difference, an experience not possible on the systems before. 

 

Sure, jumping from Toy Story to Clockwork Knight is not as impressive, but you know what I mean.

 

Yeah the Dreamcast was nice, going from e.g. House of the Dead 1 to 2, for me it was great. But I had a Japanese DC on RGB scart in my uni room and ‘normal’ people had no idea it wasn’t a PlayStation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

When I actually sat down and thought about the features that had the most impact on the games I played, and more importantly, how I played them it was 4 joypad ports as standard on the N64 (and GC). You could simply take your joypad to a friends house and be able to join in, not rely on the logistical entertainment of making sure whoever owns the multitap has remembered it. 

 

It's just taken for granted now that you can connect 4+ joypads to a console.

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Biggest jump for me was - by far - PS1/N64/Saturn to Dreamcast/PS2/GC/Xbox.

 

An absolutely gargantuous leap, from basically early 3D to "refined 3D".

 

Seeing Soul Calibur on Dreamcast in a shop for the first time was utterly mind blowing. Literally couldn't believe what I was seeing. 

All of this was in shop kiosk displays. Seeing Ridge Racer V! Seeing Rogue Leader for the first time! Seeing Halo for the first time and that massive open world!  

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I think that one is magnified by the awful output of UK N64s and the fact people still used RF with PS1 and Saturn quite a lot to a Dreamcast in VGA.

 

Not only were the machines a leap, it's the era people finally started universally using non shit cables.

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45 minutes ago, Dudley said:

I think that one is magnified by the awful output of UK N64s and the fact people still used RF with PS1 and Saturn quite a lot to a Dreamcast in VGA.

 

Not only were the machines a leap, it's the era people finally started universally using non shit cables.


err who had an rgb tv in 1997?
 

My friends all had rf tellies in their room with small portables, cables didn’t even come into it. 

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Saturn came with RGB Scart cable in the box (which caused a problem for anyone without an RGB Scart capable TV - articles about hooking it up via your VCR)

 

I loved it though as it saved me needing to buy a RGB Scart cable

 

in fairness anyone into Megadrive (in particular) there were lots of articles in the early 90’s about how much better RGB Scart was and also about 50Hz vs 60Hz in the magazines if the time. 

 

Most people with a Sony portable tv would have had RGB Scart.

 

However - agreed that most people would just use RF or Composite. I seem to remember even PS3 coming with composite as standard (with HDMI extra?) 360 had that awesome Composite/Component switchable cable which I thought was a brilliant idea.

 

Seeing Dreamcast running on a good CRT PC monitor via VGA was a true show-stopping moment. So much visual fidelity!

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20 hours ago, ulala said:


err who had an rgb tv in 1997?
 

My friends all had rf tellies in their room with small portables, cables didn’t even come into it. 

 

That's what I'm saying yes.  We all had shit TVs with shit cables than the DC came along with VGA monitor support.

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A sign of the times but when the Saturn launched (and also when there were massive shortages of the PS1 and Game managed to source PAL machines from abroad which came with a scart cable and a power lead we had to swap in store for a UK one) it was funny how many people had no idea what Scart was and didn't know if their TV had it or not.  It was the era of going to someone's house and seeing that they watched 4:3 TV stretched weirdly on their new 16:9 set.  People were often not that tech savvy, you just plugged stuff into your TV and watched it.  

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21 hours ago, ulala said:


err who had an rgb tv in 1997?
 

My friends all had rf tellies in their room with small portables, cables didn’t even come into it. 


Me. I got my Sega Saturn in 1996 and that came with an RGB Scart lead that I simply plugged into my TV. 

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I got my Saturn in 1996 edit: it was actually March/April 1997 from special reserve. I'd worked my paper round for ages to afford it then when it came I only had RF on my bedroom TV, so had to trade in two Mega Drive games at the local market for a Blaze RF Unit. Never felt so gipped in all my young life. Sega were just too far ahead of the times, as usual. 

 

Then the Dreamcast came with a fucking RF unit and I had to buy a SCART :lol: mom and dad had divorced by now so I was allowed to set up my consoles downstairs. Every cloud etc

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39 minutes ago, SeanR said:


/me waves in nerd

 

22 hours ago, ulala said:


err who had an rgb tv in 1997?
 

My friends all had rf tellies in their room with small portables, cables didn’t even come into it. 


 

I had a RGB tv back in 94. Even back then I knew there was a massive difference. Not just in picture but in sound. RF was mono only

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Just to add to the TV willy waving. I had a really decent Sony set that did just about everything, including ntsc and teletext, in 1995. But we used to get them in the staff graded sale for something stupid like £30.

 

My grandparents set, which I think they got in the late 80s, would accept any input you could name as well. I sold it last year, purely because of the space it took up, but it worked really well for everything up the the ps360 hdmi generation. 

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The set I used was bought from something called the Bargain Pages. :lol: Which was the early 90s equivalent of Ebay.

 

If i remember i wrote off the set prior to this one, by opening it up and expanding the v-size setting which was on a potentiometer. This set was fucking ancient, no remote, no service menu. But the upshot of this was I could play Street Fighter 2 on SNES without the massive borders. However, other games wouldn't look right so I had to keep on opening and messing about when I wanted to play other games. How I avoided electrocution I have no idea. 

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17 hours ago, Grey Fox said:

Saturn came with RGB Scart cable in the box (which caused a problem for anyone without an RGB Scart capable TV - articles about hooking it up via your VCR)

 

I loved it though as it saved me needing to buy a RGB Scart cable

 

I've heard people talk before about how the UK Saturn came with a SCART cable so many people got the console home to find they couldn't play it - but I'd assumed they meant it came with a composite SCART lead, not RGB!

 

Quote

in fairness anyone into Megadrive (in particular) there were lots of articles in the early 90’s about how much better RGB Scart was and also about 50Hz vs 60Hz in the magazines if the time.

 

I think the first time I ever heard of the idea that there might be something better than the lead that came with the console was when someone wrote into the Official Sega Magazine (issue #9 if anyone wants to check!) with a circuit diagram and instructions for making your own. (Bonus yellow letter in the photo!)

 

IMG_20210116_150333_resize_45.thumb.jpg.47afe029422bea31a4e16faead3d10ee.jpgIMG_20210116_150156_resize_16.thumb.jpg.502a660406d7fc3801c83aaaa0fbdbd6.jpgIMG_20210116_145820_resize_96.thumb.jpg.0d9b06b6a092333cb314064d9d7bae29.jpg

 

Releasing a design into the public domain and then threatening to sue anyone who claims it as their own? I don't think that's how the public domain works... :unsure:

 

Quote

Most people with a Sony portable tv would have had RGB Scart.

 

However - agreed that most people would just use RF or Composite. I seem to remember even PS3 coming with composite as standard (with HDMI extra?) 360 had that awesome Composite/Component switchable cable which I thought was a brilliant idea.

 

I got my 360 in 2010 after the Slim revision came out, but I think it only came with a composite cable and HDMI lead, and I didn't have a HDTV yet. Not wanting to use the composite cable, I had to hunt down an RGB SCART Xbox 360 cable, which were already quite hard to find; Game and Gamestation didn't have any. I think I ordered one from either Zavvi or Lik-Sang in the end.

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