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Controllers - Batteries not included


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1 hour ago, Clipper said:

Hey remember how we love talking about batteries :D

 

https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2021-01-07-no-microsoft-isnt-forced-to-use-batteries-in-xbox-controllers-because-of-a-deal-with-duracell

 

:D

 

 

 

(turns out MS choose AAs because some people like the choice :P )

I've got four of the exact batteries shown so it looks like it worked on me.

 

Everyone seems to go on about Eneloop batteries, are they better than Duracells?

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9 minutes ago, Timmo said:

I've got four of the exact batteries shown so it looks like it worked on me.

 

Everyone seems to go on about Eneloop batteries, are they better than Duracells?

 

I've really no idea but after the shambles of my PS4 controllers dying after a few hours after years of use I honestly prefer using batteries.

 

Got eneloops, they last forever honestly. I've a stack charged - if my controller dies I swap in new ones in a minute and I'm playing again and the old ones go on charge and back in the small pile once done. I prefer it so much!

 

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Amazon Basics rechargeables are the ones I go for. I think they're the same manufacturer as eneloops, not quite as good I'm sure but a lot cheaper. Cheap enough you can just buy a big stack to keep around for anything and everything. 

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The thing I like about Eneloops is, they hold a charge for ages. Not sure how it is with other rechargeables, but I'm sure I read a few years back that one of Eneloops claims was that they hold a charge much longer than other rechargeables. I have about 8 of them always sat ready charged and it's so much better than plugging in a cable and continuing to play that way while a controller charges. 

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25 minutes ago, SteveH said:

The thing I like about Eneloops is, they hold a charge for ages. Not sure how it is with other rechargeables, but I'm sure I read a few years back that one of Eneloops claims was that they hold a charge much longer than other rechargeables. 

The generic term is low self-discharge (LSD) rechargeable batteries - Eneloops were the first brand on the market of this type but lots of other brands and generic versions exist now, generally made in the same factory (Sanyo originally developed, manufactured and sold Eneloop batteries, Panasonic acquired Sanyo but were made to sell the factory for competition reasons but retained the Eneloop brand. This doesn’t explain how Eneloop branded batteries are still better today, though).

 

You can usually tell rechargeables are low self-discharge because they come pre-charged and usually describe themselves as such.

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7 hours ago, Simmy said:

 

I've really no idea but after the shambles of my PS4 controllers dying after a few hours after years of use I honestly prefer using batteries.

 

Got eneloops, they last forever honestly. I've a stack charged - if my controller dies I swap in new ones in a minute and I'm playing again and the old ones go on charge and back in the small pile once done. I prefer it so much!

 

 

Completely agree. There are some controllers like the Switch Pro Controller which have awesome internal batteries, but these designs are few and far between. I much prefer to have a controller which takes AA batteries so that I can use rechargeable ones like the Enerloops you mention, or if I'm desperate, just slap in a couple of AA's I have in the kitchen drawer. Under-spec'd internal battery designs for controllers with complex lighting, sound, and rumble features is a nightmare.

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I have had AAs on a cycle through my controllers for 10 years. Judging battery life is hard as I dont jot down start and stop game times! But I think on a freshly recharged 1900MaH pair I get about 15 hrs ish - it might be more but I'm guessing based on how many days play I get before I have to swap out the batteries for a fresh set. My current stock of batteries consists of (in order of effectiveness low to high)

 

1) AmazonBasics that are 5 yrs old... These last least amount of time in the controllers , I think they have lost about 50% of their charge over that time so I still get 7+hrs out of them

2) Eneloops that are nearly 10 years old - They hold a good 70% at least charge I am still getting 10hrs plus out of the,

3) "New" AmazonBasics ones that are about a yr old - still hold full charge so 15 hrs ish

 

all of the above stay in rotation as none of them are dead and they easily last longer than it takes to recharge them :D

 

EDIt - so I much prefer having the choice of using rechargeables or play/charge etc but the price is annoying. I would expect the AA controller to be cheaper than a controller with internal battery as I have to supply a play/charge or rechargeable AAs... it is not a great problem as I already own AAs for various kids toys etc but it is a niggle :D

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im not getting "into it" as we had too many derails on batteries before... the xbox controller is 55 quid retial, switch pro is 55 and (yes ok) the PS5 is 60

 

So one competitor is same price and the other is 5 quid more (and has more "stuff" in it like those triggery things and microphone/speaker). So yes one is 5 quid more but, to me, that isn't enough of a discount for not having internal battery and having to supply my own batteries or a play/charge. If yhou want equivalent internal battery it makes MS far more expensive.

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We ought to have a batteries in controllers thread so this topic can be found easily by those who want to watch this debate play out in exactly the same way 1000 more times.

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11 minutes ago, Clipper said:

im not getting "into it" as we had too many derails on batteries before... the xbox controller is 55 quid retial, switch pro is 55 and (yes ok) the PS5 is 60

 

So one competitor is same price and the other is 5 quid more (and has more "stuff" in it like those triggery things and microphone/speaker). So yes one is 5 quid more but, to me, that isn't enough of a discount for not having internal battery and having to supply my own batteries or a play/charge. If yhou want equivalent internal battery it makes MS far more expensive.

 

I think having batteries as a choice is brilliant, and wouldn't want it any other way. But I agree that MS over price their pads. It should be £39.99 RRP tops. Not the same price bracket as other much more advanced pads. 

 

Microsoft have been testing the waters to see what fans think of the PS Triggers and would they like it in the Xbox pad. I could see them in the future updating the pad to have them and a built in battery, become the default pad for the console and have an rrp of about £70-80. 

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24 minutes ago, Wahwah* said:

We ought to have a batteries in controllers thread so this topic can be found easily by those who want to watch this debate play out in exactly the same way 1000 more times.

Can you now ask for tomorrows lottery numbers?

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51 minutes ago, Clipper said:

im not getting "into it" as we had too many derails on batteries before... the xbox controller is 55 quid retial, switch pro is 55 and (yes ok) the PS5 is 60

 

So one competitor is same price and the other is 5 quid more (and has more "stuff" in it like those triggery things and microphone/speaker). So yes one is 5 quid more but, to me, that isn't enough of a discount for not having internal battery and having to supply my own batteries or a play/charge. If yhou want equivalent internal battery it makes MS far more expensive.

 

Of course it's cheaper in the long term because when the batteries die it's £5 batteries not a £60 controller.

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See if we're going to get pedanty about it the Pro Controller has no triggers nor a headphone jack. That's two pieces of functionality that Xbox Controller has and is the same price.


Seriously though, I would have loved a headphone jack on the Pro Controller.

 

As for batteries I just bought a Venom dock thing with battery packs. Not sure if the constant charging is any more economical than the disposable batteries. I guess it would be as there's no physical waste.

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How much of a doofus do you have to be to hear that Microsoft and Duracell have a deal, and then conclude that Big Alkaline is calling the shots in the Xbox division?

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7 minutes ago, Clipper said:

SLow news day at Eurogamer I think :D

 

(that's nothing - I have to like with the ignominy of "starting" a thread of controller batteries :D )

 


I did see the false story going around Twitter for a while before so I can see why they bothered to do a debunking.

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14 hours ago, Simmy said:

 

I've really no idea but after the shambles of my PS4 controllers dying after a few hours after years of use I honestly prefer using batteries.

 

 

I'm intrigued though, what's a few hours in this case? I can start a game night at 18:00, end at 01:00 while in a voice chat, and the thing just doesn't run out. Same experience on PS5. Granted, DS4 and the DualSense are not a "charge once every month" proposition akin to the Switch Pro Controller, but battery life has not been that much of an issue in the grand scheme of things.

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1 hour ago, Clipper said:

im not getting "into it" as we had too many derails on batteries before... the xbox controller is 55 quid retial, switch pro is 55 and (yes ok) the PS5 is 60

 

So one competitor is same price and the other is 5 quid more (and has more "stuff" in it like those triggery things and microphone/speaker). So yes one is 5 quid more but, to me, that isn't enough of a discount for not having internal battery and having to supply my own batteries or a play/charge. If yhou want equivalent internal battery it makes MS far more expensive.

"I'm not getting into it..."

 

*immediately gets 'into it'*

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55 minutes ago, Dudley said:

 

Of course it's cheaper in the long term because when the batteries die it's £5 batteries not a £60 controller.

 

Oooh, you pay way too much for batteries, man. Who's your battery guy?

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9 minutes ago, Swallow said:

 

Oooh, you pay way too much for batteries, man. Who's your battery guy?

 

£5 is about right for decent rechargeables no?

 

Of course if you have 2 sets, an Xbox controller also charges near instantly.

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I bought an official play and charge kit when I bought a Xbox One years ago and its still going strong - get at least 6-7hours play with a headset attached. So whilst the official kits may seem expensive - especially when you buy a new console etc they are good value long term. 

 

Also have a bunch of rechargeable AA batteries kicking around too. 

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12 hours ago, Halo said:

 

I did some looking into this recently.

 

Even though they are made in the same Japanese factory, they are not quite the same product.

 

Eneloops seem to last about 25-50% more recharge cycles than “generic” (i.e. non-Eneloop) low self-discharge batteries (say 1000 vs 500-750 cycles before their held charge becomes significantly worse that it seriously impacts performance).

 

AmazonBasics seem to be one of the better generic versions (around £1.50-£1.75/AA battery). It seems reasonable to assume Energizer/Duracell sit in the middle of the pack in terms of performance but there doesn’t seem to be much info on this.

 

Value-wise, it depends on the cost you can get the Eneloops - and there seems to be a bit of a shortage of Eneloops right now. If you can get them for something like £2-£2.50/AA battery delivered then they become slightly better value long-term, along with being slightly more convenient as they don’t need to be replaced as often, but at a higher upfront cost.

 

You also need to be aware of fake Eneloop batteries which are widespread on places like eBay. They will work but are rewrapped lower-quality batteries that won’t last as long so are best avoided.

 

Eneloop Pros have a higher capacity (2400mah vs 1900mah) but have about a third-to-a-quarter of the lifespan of standard Eneloops (about 250-350 cycles). They are also considerably more expensive than standard Eneloops (around £3 per battery).

 

Eneloop Pros last about 25-50% more recharge cycles than generic high-capacity low self-discharge batteries.

 

Only buy high capacity rechargeables if you decide you really need the high-capacity, otherwise they are a false economy over their lifetime compared

with standard low self-discharge batteries, whether Eneloop or generic.

 

Given this, if you really want high capacity batteries, most generic high-capacity batteries - such as IKEA Ladda batteries (at £1.38/AA battery collected or £1.86 per battery for 8 delivered) or AmazonBasics High Capacity (around £1.50/AA battery) - will be much better value over their lifetime than Eneloop Pros.

 

No matter what you get, they are much better value than equivalent disposables.

 

Still getting over this post since reading it this morning. Stunning stuff.

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