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7 hours ago, QuackQuack said:

Ditch the orchestra, bring back the bangers

 

 


What game is this?! What a banger of a track, and fantastically homoerotic stage. 
 

I’m surprised this hasn’t been said, but - the loss of the arcade, not just as a scene and a phenomenon, but as a driving force for game development. The idea that a home release would be “arcade perfect” and it be the highest compliment. That games were designed to be understood, playable and enjoyed within 5 minutes - easy to learn, difficult to master, according to Nolan Bushnell’s maxim. It’s a way of playing that we just don’t do anymore - the need to feed a machine with coins that led to the development of a whole ethos of game design. 
 

I believe it has everlasting merit and, artistically and intellectually, hasn’t been exhausted. 

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Silence.

 

Prior to optimal media, consoles (and 8 bit computers too) didn't make a noise when you were playing. No fans, nothing spinning and whirring.

 

Nowadays, people spend hundreds on making their PCs quieter, or console users wear headphones to drown out the blast of fans and low volume but highly irritating console whine.

 

My PS5 is nice and quiet when playing but the disc drive sounds like a Chinook taking off. It's still 10 times better than my PS4 which drowned out most of TLOU2.

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Big budget AAA 2D games, don't get me wrong - there's the odd one and AAA studios do make 2D games - but they're usually exploitative cash grabs or low budget, almost Indie like affairs.

 

I'd love to see the industry's best - all competing over who can make the biggest 2D action game, giving them CoD like budgets and the latest tech.

 

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34 minutes ago, cubik said:

Silence.

 

Prior to optimal media, consoles (and 8 bit computers too) didn't make a noise when you were playing. No fans, nothing spinning and whirring.

 

Nowadays, people spend hundreds on making their PCs quieter, or console users wear headphones to drown out the blast of fans and low volume but highly irritating console whine.

 

My PS5 is nice and quiet when playing but the disc drive sounds like a Chinook taking off. It's still 10 times better than my PS4 which drowned out most of TLOU2.

You need a series x, my friend. It's oh, so quiet. 

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There are still plenty of games which don't necessarily concern themselves with cinematic or literary ambitions, and which definitely still feature very 'gamey' soundtracks. Any half-decent shmup from the last five years should scratch that itch. :)

 

 

Edit: the Nakazawa track is a remix of Shinin' Queen from Cleopatra Fortune.

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While we're on the subject of videogame music I've always wanted to know what was going on with Sega back in the day.  Who the hell was Alan Jay, the voice? If you played Ferrari F355 challenge you know what I mean. The music on that game was unbelievably bad, wrong in so many way, yet it suited the game and was part of the experience.  Not a single intelligible lyric but I wouldn't have it any other way. 

 

Yet there's no information on the internet at all about who the band was. Was it Sega's own in-house rock band?

 

The same is true of Sega Rally 95. The music on the arcade version is the same as the music on the Saturn version. For the Saturn it's obviously been performed by a real band. Or at least been performed with real instruments. The arcade version uses FM synthesis which begs the question which came first? The music works too well as a CD quality rock song to make me believe that it was originally composed as arcade FM synthesis music. Sega must have employ their own rock band.

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1 hour ago, GamesGamesGames said:

Good arcade style football games. Kick Off 2 would still wipe the floor with everything of its type.

But Kick Off 2 was a pile of shite. Sensible World of Soccer on the other hand....

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Can you imagine Magical Hat Turbo Flying Adventure getting made away from anything other than some random indy phone game? That shit got released, and despite having almost zero english, you could play it and have some vague idea of what was going on.

 

Hell, every trip to the local games importer was an adventure of discovery. That did obviously have it's drawbacks on occasion....

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Something else we have lost....  The limitation.  Bear with me.

 

Watching stuff like Spaceballs State of the Art and 9 Fingers demos, they are fascinating. Amazing even. But the reason is that all the way through you're constantly thinking "holy shit, they made this on an Amiga!" .  The graphics , the music, it's all made all the more impressive because you know it's coming from a couple of 880k floppy disks.  That music you're hearing is coming from a machine that has 512k of ram and can only play 4 samples at once. If someone gave you a VHS copy you'd be like, who cares? It's the fact it's running on an Amiga and you know what an Amiga is capable of and it shouldn't be able to do that.

 

Today the stuff programmers can achieve seems limitless, so I'm not impressed by amazing graphics and great music because there's no reason not to have great graphics these days.  It doesn't seem possible to be impressed by how hard programmers are pushing the hardware because the hardware is limitless.

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2 minutes ago, marsh said:

Can you imagine Magical Hat Turbo Flying Adventure getting made away from anything other than some random indy phone game? That shit got released, and despite having almost zero english, you could play it and have some vague idea of what was going on.

 

Hell, every trip to the local games importer was an adventure of discovery. That did obviously have it's drawbacks on occasion....

My first Megadrive game was Magical Hat. Played it to death.

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1 hour ago, Popo said:

fantastically homoerotic stage

The background for that Youtube track/video, is the background for Yuri Sakazaki's stage in Art of Fighting 2.

Which funnily enough is exactly the sort of game that you intimate in your awesome post!

Supremely well-crafted, high-quality audio/visual and with gameplay that's quick to play, takes longer to master and that stands the test of time.

God I miss decent arcade-style games, they're so few and far between now.

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Fantastic thread.

 

I think for me the biggest thing is there being any mystery. I know it's compounded by the wonder of youth, but games used to feel limitless, and part of that was not having the internet tear into it and uncover absolutely every detail on day 1. We know literally eveything about games as soon as they're released now, and I really miss the feeling that there could be something amazing hidden away.

 

12 hours ago, dumpster said:

Nailed that.  Light Guns stopped working with household TVs just as the TVs got big enough to make them really fun.  I thought VR would work well with Time Crisis style games but the 3D seems to make it really hard to aim accurately.  I'm contemplating the Sinden gun because the idea of Point Blank on a big TV is really tempting.

 

I find the aiming on VR controllers, Wii remotes and all modern pointer devices is really shaky and horrible. I don't know if it's because it's actually more accurate, or because there's a cursor on screen but it feel like absolute garbage compared to a GCon 45.

 

11 hours ago, Jolly said:

I'm afraid to say everyone that I think the videogame music thing is just you being a bit old. There's plenty of excellent original stuff still being produced. 

 

It's more the need to create something memorable. I don't think it's necessarily the hardware aspect, because I'd argue that movie soundtracks are also not great anymore. The desire to have a clear, memorable melody that drives a main theme is just not as common in any media now. It's true of games, where we're still rehashing the Zelda theme for every new game 30 years on but very few new games have a memorable central theme, but it's also true in movies where the closest we have is the weak ass Avengers theme and nobody has come close to the golden age of Star Wars, Indiana Jones etc.

 

10 hours ago, Popo said:

 

Yes agreed - the cynical side of me says that DLC business model has rendered this kind of thing obsolete, but I think this also extends from the modern trend to allow the player to see as much of the game as possible because they paid for it.

 

The concept of hiding content away behind late game challenge barriers has emerged now that we know most people don't finish their games.

 

I can't imagine how the "Dark Souls should have an easy mode" crowd would respond to whole modes being locked behind completion. As you've pointed out, the idea that if you've paid for the game you should be allowed to play any bit of it as and when you want to is way more common now.

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7 hours ago, Broker said:

I find the aiming on VR controllers, Wii remotes and all modern pointer devices is really shaky and horrible. I don't know if it's because it's actually more accurate, or because there's a cursor on screen but it feel like absolute garbage compared to a GCon 45.


git gud

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, dumpster said:

Something else we have lost....  The limitation.  Bear with me.

...

Today the stuff programmers can achieve seems limitless, and this negatively affects my impressions of it.  I'm not impressed by amazing graphics and great music because there's no reason not to have great graphics these days.  The tech is capable of such incredible performance that amazing graphics and sound becomes the normal expectation.  It doesn't seem possible to be impressed by how hard programmers are pushing the hardware because the hardware is limitless.


Yeah, I think the above is why Mode 7 effects on the SNES still impress me to this day whenever I’m lucky enough to witness their splendour.

 

If anything I’m even more impressed by it nowadays because I understand the inventiveness of its trickery better than I did at the time.

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3 hours ago, Plissken said:

Local split-screen multiplayer stopped being a thing a while ago.  I remember seeing it done in Pitstop II and thinking that it was witchcraft.

That's a really good example.  Used to have some good multiplayer Stunt Car Racer sessions with a null modem cable. There's a lot of fun you get from multiplayer when you're all in the same room.  I usually find that playing online multiplayer is like playing single player where the other characters are way better than the game than me.

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What's even weirder is that it was very popular when you had 14-20" screens in the 80's, or 24-30" screens in the 90s but now people are only 40"-60" screens and don't have the option.

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12 minutes ago, Plissken said:

What's even weirder is that it was very popular when you had 14-20" screens in the 80's, or 24-30" screens in the 90s but now people are only 40"-60" screens and don't have the option.

And using the strategy of looking at other people's windows to see what they were doing!  I much prefer multi player on one couch.

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Enjoying this thread. Although somethings here are best consigned to history. Remember multi-load Spectrum games? Ugh. 
 

However, one thing I have missed since the PlayStation 1 days, is value game compilations. The cash-strapped whippersnapper could score some massive bargains and think they’d just bought £60 of games for £15. 
 

107772F7-70DF-448C-B523-A5B40B0A231D.jpeg.132002f0e7073f569cf4b48cc6d99be1.jpeg

Power Up was one of the best things I owned as a kid. So many good games in one box! And Altered Beast!!! (Which I still loved because you didn’t often get massive sprites on the Spectrum)

 

But I loved how random they sometimes were, and got you into games you never would’ve bothered with otherwise. I’d’ve never bought a snooker game, but I played Jimmy White to death, thanks to “The Greatest”.

 

B73F0B31-35FC-4717-BCA3-43FAEE4689A7.jpeg.16aedd956b0f7afe0b66721678b2645c.jpeg

 

So I miss that. I’m treating this batch of free PS4 games coming out this month as a compilation. Abzu + The Witness + Horizon Zero Dawn? Bargain!!!

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I'm not nostalgic at all, and I think Gen Xers are being served well enough for their 'chunky physical shit to plug cartridges into' with the Evercade, Analog Mega Drives and all sorts of other FPGA gubbins coming down the line. 

 

That said, I think 'progress' on pads has taken a step back. What I mean is, they have been packed with too much tech and become fragile. I've been restoring an SFC for sale and this:

 

112097381_s-l300(3).jpg.0b823c0e5180f0143322c1063fc044d7.jpg

 

... is utter perfection. You could take it to a building site, knock nails in with it all day then beat your laps on F-Zero with it when you got home. 

 

The push to have haptics, increased rumble, more sensitive analogue systems etc has made modern pads (particularly the Joycons and the Dualsense) way too fragile and prone to failure. If you get inside them, they're crammed full of tiny ribbon cables, miniature contacts and an excess of carbon - all stuff that fails fast when used a lot, and/or bashed about. 

 

It's all form over function or, well, more accurately, over robustness and durability. A pad's first duty is to take physical punishment, and we're in a period now that reminds me of early CD players: blink at them and they'd jump, skip, fail. 

 

I'd personally make the Dualsense an 'elite' controller and increase the price whilst using components with far higher durability. I'd pack-in a less sophisticated but more robust option, ie a slightly upgraded DS4. But hey, consumers have sky-high expectations so going 'backward' is verrrry hard. 

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4 hours ago, Twinbee said:

Enjoying this thread. Although somethings here are best consigned to history. Remember multi-load Spectrum games? Ugh. 
 

However, one thing I have missed since the PlayStation 1 days, is value game compilations. The cash-strapped whippersnapper could score some massive bargains and think they’d just bought £60 of games for £15. 
 

107772F7-70DF-448C-B523-A5B40B0A231D.jpeg.132002f0e7073f569cf4b48cc6d99be1.jpeg

Power Up was one of the best things I owned as a kid. So many good games in one box! And Altered Beast!!! (Which I still loved because you didn’t often get massive sprites on the Spectrum)

 

But I loved how random they sometimes were, and got you into games you never would’ve bothered with otherwise. I’d’ve never bought a snooker game, but I played Jimmy White to death, thanks to “The Greatest”.

 

B73F0B31-35FC-4717-BCA3-43FAEE4689A7.jpeg.16aedd956b0f7afe0b66721678b2645c.jpeg

 

So I miss that. I’m treating this batch of free PS4 games coming out this month as a compilation. Abzu + The Witness + Horizon Zero Dawn? Bargain!!!


Five Crash Smashes! And wasn't there a compilation linked to Live Aid?

 

Yes, Soft Aid: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_Aid

 

Also, full games and compilations as cover mounts, on mags for ageing machines...

 

 

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