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If You Love a Game, Buy It at Full Price says Days Gone Creative Director


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I bought Lair Of The Clockwork God on switch at launch for full price because I liked their previous stuff and have only put a few hours in, and that was down to a fiver recently.

No regrets though. 

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3 minutes ago, phillv85 said:


Well I figured I was always going to buy the game and play it relatively soon, so why not get the free DLC and whatever other nonsense for pre-ordering? I don’t have time to play everything as soon as it comes out, so now I just pick it up when I’m ready, often at a lower price.

 

See my edit :)

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I thought days gone was okay but it was clearly padded for length and I'd have probably been more disappointed if I paid full price for it tbh.

 

There's definitely a good game in there but even in it's patched and finished state, it's not a £60 game by a long shot. 

 

If anything, the fact that it's got x hours worth of gameplay does it a disservice and could be a lot tighter. 

 

Portal is always one I think of in regards to it not over staying it's welcome perfectly. I think i finished it in 6 hours and didn't feel cheated in the slightest.

This really had that problem with a lot of open world games where "size of map" is more important than it having much interesting in it I thought. 

The horde stuff was great and some of the encounters and town stuff was cool but I dunno, not worth it imho at full price but then I think cod and fifa shouldn't be remotely full price either these days...

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2 hours ago, Qazimod said:

Yeah - I see where he's coming from, but games are

 

  • going to have a full-price £70 admission fee if the new gen is anything to go by
  • often being released without any playable trials
  • massive commitments of time if we're talking about the big budget experiences

 

Pretty much everything I decided to buy at full-price last year was a game I had been following for months and had already made up my mind about - FFVII, P5 Royal, Yakuza LaD. Most other purchases were - yes - from sales. Or they were nice surprises like P4G on Steam. Everything else is too much of a risk when they're all big commitments with big price tags.


You forgot “often launched half finished and full of bugs and issues that require multiple patches to fix”

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21 minutes ago, Broker said:


7 years to make a game that on the surface looks like pound shop The Last of Us. But yeah it’s all our fault that it failed because we didn’t throw them £60 for something we had no chance to try out.

From what I recall Sony did their part dedicating ample marketing and E3 press conference time to it too.

 

I’m really not seeing any great injustice here.

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Give me a demo and if it's good I'll buy your game. In the absence of demos I'm far, far less likely to take a punt.

 

In the case of this particular developer, their game was completely average and needed patching/updating for months before they were finally done with it. Based on that form I'll be waiting for their future games to be at least six months old before buying, inevitably in a sale.

 

This is how it works.

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45 minutes ago, phillv85 said:

They should stop dropping prices so quick. I got sick of buying a game day 1, not playing it until 3 months  later and seeing it’s on Amazon for £17 when I finally crack the seal. Now I just wait.

 

The problem was known years ago, it's just gotten much worse over time:

 

https://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/iwata-slams-unhealthy-software-price-reductions

 

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40 minutes ago, Stanley said:

I take full responsibility, I didn’t even buy it when it was discounted, in fact I’m partly responsible for all the games ever that didn’t do well and that I didn’t buy. 

 

I didn't even download it on ps plus.

 

But yeah, he's essentially saying pay £70 for something based on a few videos and maybe a review from one of the very few non-official sources that even do that now.

 

Nope.

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I thought it was pretty common knowledge that most developers stopped doing demos, after them becoming relatively commonplace at the start of the 360/PS3 era, because they very rarely helped sales. If anything, I believe they were found to be more likely to have a negative effect on sales.

 

It's really difficult to get a demo right. The opening of a game probably isn't the best way to demo a game, especially if it's a slow burn. But if you take a chunk from further into the game then it's often lacking any context and can be hard to engage with. Offer too small a slice of gameplay and people might end up shrugging their shoulders and feel underwhelmed because you haven't done enough to sell them on it. Offer too large a slice and people might have their fill of the demo alone. It's a difficult balance to get right.

 

The incredible reaction to the Bioshock demo was probably the biggest outlier I can recall. I don't remember any other demo around that time inspiring anything close to that reaction. I seem to recall the reaction to most demos being either muted or disappointed.

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I don't know why the publishers stop marketing their games shortly after release.* Nintendo keep their prices full-whack because they continue to advertise the software usually all the way up until the death of the host system.

*I've had a think. Maybe they're publishing far too many games in order to do this effectively.

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4 hours ago, Mr Do 71 said:

Thankgod for Game Pass.

So do you reckon Microsoft are going to make “engagement” the metric they use to judge a sequel?


I see what this guy is saying but it’s just universal risk averse behaviour on behalf of the publishers and the customers themselves.

 

Im not sure trust in the industry is what it was 10-15 years ago.

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11 minutes ago, Fallows said:

Maybe they're publishing far too many games in order to do this effectively.


I think this is a big part of the problem in general, if you want to call it a problem. 

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2 hours ago, wretcherd said:

I bought Lair Of The Clockwork God on switch at launch for full price because I liked their previous stuff and have only put a few hours in, and that was down to a fiver recently.

No regrets though. 

 

It's an argument that's stronger the cheaper the game is, as the saving to be had is likewise smaller.

 

But even then, every game is competing with the race to the bottom and it has clear knock on effects. The small difference between £15 now and £5 in six months isn't worth waiting for if you really want to play it now, but it's enough to make you think twice when you can just play all the other stuff competing for your attention.

 

The stuff that's already been out for six months, and is reduced right now.

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10 hours ago, b00dles said:

I thought days gone was okay but it was clearly padded for length

 

God it really is.

It got more than a little ridiculous many hours and countless life threatening missions in and the camp still doesn't trust me enough to SELL me a shotgun.

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This is an odd situation, because I know there are a vocal internet (minority) group bemoaning the fact that Days Gone 2 has been cancelled. But to be honest would it have sold that well. A sequel to an average game at best. Now if it did something brilliant and different and could expand the audience- maybe. But as it stands there have been far worse cancellations than this. 

 

Why did people only buy and play this on discount should be the question the devs are asking. And if they want the answer see all of the above posts...

 

Shifting the blame on the cancellation onto consumers is a bad look IMHO. 

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13 hours ago, Mawdlin said:

I love Days Gone but that is a bit rich. Someone needs to tell him not to hide away the f****** USP of your big budget release until the player is 20 hours in.


that is a good point. They should have paced it like a blockbuster movie . Ie big set piece before the opening titles to give it that wow factor.

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9 hours ago, Fallows said:

I don't know why the publishers stop marketing their games shortly after release.* Nintendo keep their prices full-whack because they continue to advertise the software usually all the way up until the death of the host system.

*I've had a think. Maybe they're publishing far too many games in order to do this effectively.


Well, there’s a middle ground between full-on marketing and dropping the price by 50% within a month of release, which happens all too often.

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14 minutes ago, chipsgravy said:

This is an odd situation, because I know there are a vocal internet (minority) group bemoaning the fact that Days Gone 2 has been cancelled. But to be honest would it have sold that well. A sequel to an average game at best. Now if it did something brilliant and different and could expand the audience- maybe. But as it stands there have been far worse cancellations than this. 

 

Why did people only buy and play this on discount should be the question the devs are asking. And if they want the answer see all of the above posts...

 

Shifting the blame on the cancellation onto consumers is a bad look IMHO. 

Well he’s no longer with the company having apparently bowed out of game development altogether, it’s still insulting to his audience though. 

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With the odd exception, the only games I buy at full price are Nintendo’s. 
 

I can be reasonably confident that their games are ‘finished’, enjoyable, and the price won’t be cut to the bone before I find time to play it. 

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I remember when they first announced it. An open world where you pleay a growling 'badass' and get to do rinse and repeat tasks like clear bandit camps. Oh it's set in post-apocalyptic America and features zombies. I was all like.

 

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8 minutes ago, Harsin said:

I remember when they first announced it. An open world where you pleay a growling 'badass' and get to do rinse and repeat tasks like clear bandit camps. Oh it's set in post-apocalyptuc America and features zombies. I was all like.

 

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Yet that’s the exact same setting at The Last of Us 2 and that sold incredibly well.

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I’m intrigued by the desire to slash prices to sub-£20 within a year of release. Who decides this anyway? The publisher?

 

Is it because it generates a short-term revenue uptick for an otherwise non-performing game?

 

Or is it because there’s a desire to clear the decks before the next big release splashes down? Perhaps dropping the price gives that game a chance to keep its head above water and be seen by players before being swept under the waves?

 

I’d love to read an Edge article on this phenomenon. 

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His issue should be with the publishers and retail channels of his industry.  They've collectively walked into a situation over the years where they've created a pattern for pricing. With cuts coming quickly after release and there being frequent sales. Their continuous and predictable behaviour means games are continually available at a fraction of their launch price.

 

I mean put it this way... if a consumer didn't know about a game until 6 months after it's release they'd have no choice but to pay the cut price for it. This isn't like piracy or buying from abroad where the user is trying to get around the price. They flat out only have the cheap slashed price available to them.

 

 

Nintendo continually demonstrate it doesn't have to be this way. Make quality products. Don't release a broken mess that needs patching (and sours everyone to full price day one purchases). And build games that for the most part no-one else is. Even when Nintendo do make a multiplayer shooter (Splatoon) it doesn't feel like it has got any competition because it's on Switch, where most big name shooters either don't appear or a compromised versions, and it skews (at least visually) to a younger audience.

 

Of course no one else can follow this model because for the most part they're competing in a very crowded market place and the quality of their products is too varied. Whilst I don't think all shooters or all third person open world adventures are the same the reality is that they're close enough that they are competing for money more directly than Nintendo's products are in their segments.

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1 minute ago, Popo said:

Or is it because there’s a desire to clear the decks before the next big release splashes down? Perhaps dropping the price gives that game a chance to keep its head above water and be seen by players before being swept under the waves?

 

 

With Ubisoft who are one of the main offenders for prices dropping like a cartoon character with an anvil instead of a parachute, I imagine this is major motivator.


Not many people are going to bother buying the last identikit Assassin's Creed or FarCry when the next functionally identical but in a new setting entry has just been churned off the conveyor belt.

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The thing is, without games going on discount the hobby immediately becomes a lot less accessible. £70 for a game just doesn’t make sense for loads of people who might be scraping by but can afford £30 or so for a game. There’s loads of niche Nintendo titles I’d love to give a go but I never do because they’re so expensive!
 

Days Gone is a brilliant game but is also very flawed and a bit marmite. I got it free with my PS5 and I absolutely love it, but if I’d paid £60 day one to play it on my launch PS4 with slowdown and even more bugs and all that nonsense I wouldn’t have been happy. 

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14 minutes ago, Harsin said:

 

 

With Ubisoft who are one of the main offenders for prices dropping like a cartoon character with an anvil instead of a parachute, I imagine this is major motivator.


Not many people are going to bother buying the last identikit Assassin's Creed or FarCry when the next functionally identical but in a new setting entry has just been churned off the conveyor belt.

 

That's an interesting angle I hadn't considered - that the annual series updates to series like Assassin's Creed, FIFA and Call of Duty could be influencing the wider industry pricing model.

 

It would be very interesting to speak to the people behind these decisions and understand the thinking that motivates their decisions. 

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