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Nintendo Switch OLED - who needs 4k, dat screen


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Will the ‘old’ non oled drop in price noticeably? (Sorry if this has been answered in thread I’ve not really read past the last couple of pages.) I was thinking of buying a Switch for my kids as they do enjoy gaming in a casual way but being kids I don’t think they will care much about the screen. It’ll be mostly docked in any case I think. I’m happy to get one of the new ones, though I would be pissed if the Switch 2 comes out soon after, but I’m not sure it really offers enough to make it worth it unless the price point is similar in any case.

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35 minutes ago, Alex W. said:

I feel like there’s been a trend to larger screen sizes as resolutions have improved too, so you’re more likely to get the benefit. Can you get a 4K screen that’s smaller than ~50 inches?

Not much, think 48” is about the smallest. 

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5 minutes ago, Jarik said:

I'm less concerned with 4K than I am with whether those islands floating over Hyrule will stutter.


Stutter Island, a nod towards Nintendo allegedly basing adult Link’s OoT appearance on Leonardo di Caprio.

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1 hour ago, Alex W. said:

I feel like there’s been a trend to larger screen sizes as resolutions have improved too, so you’re more likely to get the benefit. Can you get a 4K screen that’s smaller than ~50 inches?

I'm only aware of the one & it's the one i use.  Panasonic do a 40" inch TV with both 4K & HDR.

 

It was the ideal compromise between set size & picture quality, but something i've noticed is that although 4K looks really good HDR doesn't seem to make much difference.  This is either because HDR doesn't work that well at that screen size, the content i'm watching has poor optimization, or I just can't personally tell the difference.

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The thing with HDR is I have no clue what I’m supposed to be seeing, or not seeing.

 

I remember that everyone said the HDR on Cyberpunk 2077 was borked, so I turned it off, but then it seemed like I couldn’t see anything when I was in some bits of Pacifica at night, which was very realistic but a bit terrifying.

 

Mind you, despite however it’s broken I thought the use of lighting in C2077 is amazing, so I’m clearly no judge.

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26 minutes ago, Jarik said:

I'm only aware of the one & it's the one i use.  Panasonic do a 40" inch TV with both 4K & HDR.

 

It was the ideal compromise between set size & picture quality, but something i've noticed is that although 4K looks really good HDR doesn't seem to make much difference.  This is either because HDR doesn't work that well at that screen size, the content i'm watching has poor optimization, or I just can't personally tell the difference.

 

If you have the TX-40DX700B then it's because the TV doesn't have sufficient peak brightness or contrast to display HDR properly, unfortunately. 

 

Nothing to do with screen size.

 

It's a shame that quite a few TVs can market themselves as HDR when they can't really display HDR properly. Should be a minimum brightness required to use the label.

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5 minutes ago, Isaac said:

 

If you have the TX-40DX700B then it's because the TV doesn't have sufficient peak brightness or contrast to display HDR properly, unfortunately. 

 

Nothing to do with screen size.

 

It's a shame that quite a few TVs can market themselves as HDR when they can't really display HDR properly. Should be a minimum brightness required to use the label.


There is an HDR certification label, but some companies came up with an alternative certification or two which have less-strict requirements, so now it all means nothing.

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HDR could really do with specific TV options for each game rather than the sliders (eg. there could be an HDR menu in Forza Horizon 5 with ‘LG CX’ as an option with, say, the 20 most popular tellies having bespoke image profiles), and a general HDR profile on the TV itself that’s designed to be the best calibration setting without having to fiddle with tons of menus.

 

I know that publishers/devs are working to standardise with things like HGiG, but it seems silly to me that so much pissing about has to happen to get the best picture. Everything should just ‘work’ with a couple of button presses! Ultimately it would be great to have a console-wide profile for specific TVs which links in with that TV’s Game mode.

 

I don’t see why this is so difficult, tbh, particularly now that the likes of LG clearly know how much videogames fuel new TV sales.

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4 hours ago, Alex W. said:

That’s just a report saying that if Nintendo use OLED screens it’ll increase demand for OLED screens, it says nothing about who the supplier might be.

I think I posted the wrong link, because the article did claim the manufacturer mentioned they were making it.

 

That's interesting to know about who can make them at scale, though. It hadn't occurred to me that there's a Foxconn but for screens, if you see what I mean.

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If people can’t see what HDR is meant to offer, then they clearly haven’t experienced it properly, and either:

 

- The content they’re looking at isn’t doing it properly (think Red Dead Redemption 2 on release).

- Their TV isn’t setup properly.

- Their TV just isn’t very good at HDR.

- All of the above.
 

Something like Metro Exodus on a decent, properly setup TV is a phenomenal sight to behold. And just because a TV says it does HDR, doesn’t mean it can do it well. That’s its major stumbling block really.

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5 hours ago, Stanley said:

Not much, think 48” is about the smallest. 

I have a 43" 4k. It's relatively low end mind. HDR really only looks good if it's Dolby Vision or HDR10+, regular hdr can look washed out on it. 

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2 hours ago, Paulando said:

If people can’t see what HDR is meant to offer, then they clearly haven’t experienced it properly, and either:

 

- The content they’re looking at isn’t doing it properly (think Red Dead Redemption 2 on release).

- Their TV isn’t setup properly.

- Their TV just isn’t very good at HDR.

- All of the above.
 

Something like Metro Exodus on a decent, properly setup TV is a phenomenal sight to behold. And just because a TV says it does HDR, doesn’t mean it can do it well. That’s its major stumbling block really.


This doesn’t tell me anything though. What do you see and say ‘that’s HDR’?

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22 minutes ago, ZOK said:


This doesn’t tell me anything though. What do you see and say ‘that’s HDR’?


So, bright parts of the image are super-bright. In Metro Exodus - which happens to be one of the best examples - torches or lamps will actually glow on your screen like they would in real life. A sunset will glow bright over the horizon. It makes the image pop and makes non-HDR images look flat in comparison.

 

Some terrible examples are Red Dead Redemption 2 and Cyberpunk 2077 - which both just looked like they had the brightness slider set to maximum, making everything bright and looking washed out. The key part of HDR is the range - there should be a large contrast between the darkest parts of the image and the brightest parts. If a TV can’t display those bright parts bright enough, you’re also going to lose out.

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1 hour ago, Paulando said:


So, bright parts of the image are super-bright. In Metro Exodus - which happens to be one of the best examples - torches or lamps will actually glow on your screen like they would in real life. A sunset will glow bright over the horizon. It makes the image pop and makes non-HDR images look flat in comparison.

 

Some terrible examples are Red Dead Redemption 2 and Cyberpunk 2077 - which both just looked like they had the brightness slider set to maximum, making everything bright and looking washed out. The key part of HDR is the range - there should be a large contrast between the darkest parts of the image and the brightest parts. If a TV can’t display those bright parts bright enough, you’re also going to lose out.


That is helpful, but I guess the issue is you can’t compare while you are watching…I have an LG CX so I presume that does decent HDR, but I don’t know what Metro Exodus is (and I guess it’s not on Stadia) so I can’t play that. Is there anything on Netflix / Prime with ‘good’ HDR?

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1 hour ago, ZOK said:


That is helpful, but I guess the issue is you can’t compare while you are watching…I have an LG CX so I presume that does decent HDR, but I don’t know what Metro Exodus is (and I guess it’s not on Stadia) so I can’t play that. Is there anything on Netflix / Prime with ‘good’ HDR?


Watch this DF video via yer CX’s YouTube app:

 

 

I don’t have many (any?) of those games, but I bookmarked it to watch for whenever I got my OLED telly. The night time race track on like Gran Turismo or whatever is what helped me understand what I should be appreciating from good HDR. The dark night time sky still has bright stars in it, and there’s a different type of brightness coming off the stadium floodlights and the electrical car brake lights and so on. They each have a different quality of brightness yet they’re all being displayed simultaneously on the one screen. I’d never really seen or appreciated that type of thing until I got my HDR-capable OLED (also an LG CX).

 

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28 minutes ago, Calashnikov said:


Watch this DF video via yer CX’s YouTube app:

 

 

I don’t have many (any?) of those games, but I bookmarked it to watch for whenever I got my OLED telly. The night time race track on like Gran Turismo or whatever is what helped me understand what I should be appreciating from good HDR. The dark night time sky still has bright stars in it, and there’s a different type of brightness coming off the stadium floodlights and the electrical car brake lights and so on. They each have a different quality of brightness yet they’re all being displayed simultaneously on the one screen. I’d never really seen or appreciated that type of thing until I got my HDR-capable OLED (also an LG CX).

 


Great video! Only watched it on my phone, but it does a decent job of explaining what good HDR is. Metro Exodus is featured too, around 10 minutes in. It certainly has a much bigger impact on a game than just increasing the res from HD > 4K, which achieves very little beyond a sharper image.

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5 hours ago, ZOK said:


This doesn’t tell me anything though. What do you see and say ‘that’s HDR’?


Bright things appear a bit brighter. 
 

I actually think it is the investment in an oled tv that makes up most of the improvement. Blacks look really dark which makes the bright bit pop. 

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4 hours ago, HarryBizzle said:

I think Exodus was one of the free Stadia games for a while. 


I just looked and it is on there, but it’s £36 or £50 odd with all expansions. Worth getting?

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9 hours ago, Calashnikov said:

Watching it again, is that Crackdown 3 in there with the really fucking cool stylised neon city lighting? That looks like a really excellent HDR implementation. Super stylish.


 Ironically, that game launched with the HDR disabled by default. 

 

6 hours ago, ZOK said:


I just looked and it is on there, but it’s £36 or £50 odd with all expansions. Worth getting?


I played it on Game Pass and thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s fairly old now, though, so not sure I’d pay that much for it, especially as it’s been a freebie on both Stadia and Xbox.

 

I think a next gen lighting update has just launched as well. Not sure that has made its way to stadia. 

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7 hours ago, the_debaser said:


Bright things appear a bit brighter. 
 

I actually think it is the investment in an oled tv that makes up most of the improvement. Blacks look really dark which makes the bright bit pop. 

 

The contrast range is only part of it - and that's the part that game devs seem to focus on because it's a crowd pleaser, it looks flashy.

 

The best thing about HDR to me is the colour range. A good HDR telly will simply display more colours with finer gradations between. If you watch something like Jaws on UHD Blu-ray, the colours certainly aren't saturated compared to a standard Blu-ray, but they're more vibrant and 'real'. Colour is the thing to watch for with HDR, in my opinion. 

 

I agree with you that the OLED screen is more important than resolution or HDR, though. Stuff like ARMS, Splatoon 2 and MK8D looks amazing on it. 

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  • Gotters changed the title to Nintendo Switch OLED - who needs 4k, dat screen

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